Comments Off on Illegal immigrant indicted on drug, weapons charges

A federal grand jury on Thursday indicted a Mexican man and illegal immigrant living in Boaz for drug-trafficking and weapons violations related to the distribution of methamphetamine this year and in 2009, U.S. Attorney Joyce White Vance and FBI Special Agent in Charge Patrick J. Maley announced in a news release.

An 11-count indictment filed in U.S. District Court charges Tomas Ramirez Poulino, 38, with possessing with the intent to distribute 5 grams or more of methamphetamine in Marshall County on April 21, 2009. It also charges him with possessing a .22-caliber pistol in furtherance of the drug-trafficking crime, and with possessing the gun while being in the U.S. illegally.

According to the indictment, Poulino distributed more than five grams of methamphetamine in Marshall County on several different occasions in April. The indictment charges that on April 19, he possessed with the intent to distribute more than 5 kilograms of methamphetamine and, separately, more than 50 grams of the drug.

Poulino illegally possessed a Colt .45 pistol on April 19, in furtherance of a drug-trafficking crime and as an illegal alien in the U.S., according to the indictment. It also charges him with being in the country illegally on April 19 after previously having been deported to Mexico on June 22, 2009, July 15, 2009, and Sept. 1, 2009.

Possessing with the intent to distribute at least 50 grams of methamphetamine carries a maximum sentence of life in prison and a $10 million fine. Possessing with the intent to distribute at least 5 grams of methamphetamine carries a maximum penalty of 40 years in prison and a $5 million fine. Possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug-trafficking offense carries a mandatory minimum 5-year sentence to be served consecutively to any other sentence imposed, and possession of a firearm as an illegal alien carries a maximum 10-year sentence. Unauthorized re-entry into the country by an illegal alien carries a maximum 10-year sentence.

The FBI and the Marshall County Drug Enforcement Unit investigated the case. Assistant U.S. Attorney Terence M. O’Rouke is prosecuting it.

The release stressed that an indictment contains only charges, a defendant is presumed innocent and it will be the government’s burden to prove his guilt beyond a reasonable doubt at trial.

 

 

 

http://www.gadsdentimes.com/article/20120531/NEWS/120539969/1016/NEWS?p=1&tc=pg

 

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