Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Investigators with the Jackson County Sheriff’s Office Narcotics Unit served a search warrant at a home on Tyler Street in Scottsboro Thursday. Detectives have not said what evidence allowed them to obtain the search warrant.

During the search investigators said they located Methamphetamine and Methamphetamine Ice. They arrested Linda Spears Larson, 58. She is charged with Unlawful Possession of Controlled Substances (Methamphetamine).

WTVC NewsChannel 9 :: News - Top Stories - Scottsboro Woman Arrested for Meth While Out on Bond

 

Larson was out of jail on bond at the time of this arrest. She is now being held without bond, pending a bond revocation hearing.

Investigators said additional arrests are anticipated in connection with this investigation.

 

 

 

http://www.newschannel9.com/news/top-stories/stories/scottsboro-woman-arrested-meth-while-out-bond-7018.shtml

 

 

BELLEVUE, Wash. –  One person died in an accident Thursday night along I-405, and troopers say the driver at fault was under the influence of drugs, possibly methamphetamine.

It happened at about 9:45 p.m., just south of the Main Street overpass on I-405 southbound.

A spokesperson for Washington State Patrol says the driver of an Audi was going more than 100 miles per hour when it hit a BMW from behind.

The BMW then rolled, caught fire, and came to rest on the shoulder of I-405.  Troopers say the driver of that car died on the scene. The victim was a 22-year-old man who graduated from Federal Way High School.

An attorney for the victim’s family said Ian Riley Beckford was driving home after spending the day water skiing on Lake Sammamish when his car was struck.

Two other vehicles were also hit, but the drivers of those cars were not injured.

The driver of the Audi and a passenger in that car were taken to Overlake Hospital Medical Center with non-life threatening injuries.

Just after midnight, Washington State Patrol said the Audi driver was arrested for vehicular homicide. The suspect is still at the hospital under trooper guard.

Troopers reopened the roadway early Friday morning.

 

 

 

 

http://www.king5.com/news/local/One-dies-in-three-car-rollover-in-Bellevue-223580621.html

 

 

CALEXICO — U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers found 12 pounds of methamphetamine estimated to be worth about $231,000 in a vehicle at the Calexico East Port of Entry on Friday.

Around 10 a.m., a 37-year-old female U.S. citizen driving a 2004 Ford Expedition approached the port, and a CBP canine team alerted to the vehicle she was driving, according to a CBP press release.

Officers then found 31 wrapped packages of methamphetamine in the vehicle’s transfer case, a component of the transmission. The narcotics had a total weight of 12 pounds.

Neyba de Let Vazquez-Flores was taken into custody of Homeland Security Investigation agents for further processing and transported to Imperial County jail where she faces a felony charge of importation of a controlled substance.

Vazquez-Flores admitted she knew of the narcotics and stated she was to be paid $2,000 to smuggle it into the United States, according to the court complaint.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.ivpressonline.com/news/local/valley-police-beat-more-than-worth-of-meth-found-in/article_8e77f7ba-1c41-11e3-a697-001a4bcf6878.html

 

 

Wednesday Evening Update:
Since the publication of this week’s print edition, Mayor Chris Wilkinson, pastor at Morning Star Church, has been asked to step down from his role by church members. The Lincoln Journal has learned that the mayor was contacted by a church member Monday afternoon regarding the use of the church bus in the meth raid. An announcement in this coming weekend’s Lincoln Times publication says the church members are looking for a new pastor. Next week’s print edition of The Lincoln Journal will have further updates on the situation.

 9-10-2013-10-42-07-AM-3464563
The Morning Star Church bus. INSET: Jerry Maynard and Mark Vance
Original Story:
HARTS – A multi-agency law enforcement operation broke up an active methamphetamine lab in the south of the county last week. According of Lincoln County Chief Sheriff’s Deputy J.J. Napier, deputies, Hamlin Police Department officers, and West Virginia State Police personnel traveled aboard a church bus to Little Harts Creek Road in an effort to surprise the accused parties in the community. Chief Napier told The Lincoln Journal, late last week, that the Morning Star Community Church bus was used for the operation. The church, located near the intersection of Lower Big Creek and Upper Mud River Road outside Hamlin, is pastored by Hamlin Mayor Chris Wilkinson, who is also the municipality’s chief of police.
Two criminal complaints on file in the office of Lincoln County Magistrate Mona Snodgrass offer some insight into the operation, which unfolded shortly after 6 p.m., Thursday evening, September 5, 2013. According to the complaint for Jerry Maynard, 39, officers from all three agencies responded to a drug tip received in the office of Lincoln County Sheriff Ken Farley.  The tip alleged that Maynard was operating a clandestine drug lab at his home. Upon arriving, officers from the three departments located meth making materials in a trash bag in the woods behind Maynard’s residence at Little Harts Creek Road. Senior State Trooper Morgan, writing in the complaint, also noted that the officers located a white substance inside the home, identified as meth by the accused. Maynard was arrested for possession of a controlled substance, operating a clandestine lab, altering pseudoephedrine, and possessing meth precursors. The accused told Trooper Morgan that he was on federal probation at the time of his arrest.
In a criminal complaint filed by Sheriff’s Deputy Adam Robinett, Mark Anthony Vance, 45, with an address at Little Harts Creek Road, was observed exiting from a camper located beside the residence of another man, Jeremy Collins.  Robinett asked Vance if Collins was inside the camper. Vance is said to have said no, and gave Robinett permission to search the camper. While inside the camper, Robinett observed a strong chemical odor associated with the production of meth, and saw a bottle with a white substance, and a drain hose coming from the top of the bottle. Robinett also observed empty bottles and several feet of clear tubing throughout the camper.
Robinett then walked behind the camper and found an empty container of lantern fuel. He also saw a bottle with a white substance inside and a drain hose coming from the bottle. The bottle’s drain hose was fuming what appeared to be smoke. Vance was placed under arrest for operating a clandestine lab and possessing meth precursors.

This isn’t the first time the same church bus has been used in fighting crime in Lincoln County. Earlier this year, the bus was deployed to transport a large number of accused individuals. The April 19, 2013 incident in the Midkiff area of Lincoln County saw nine people  -

http://lincolnjournalinc.com/police-on-church-bus-surprise-meth-makers-mayor-loses-pastorship-at-church-p10499-1.htm

 

 

 

Preacher ousted for using church bus as Trojan horse for meth raid

September 11th, 2013

A West Virginia pastor is being forced out of his church job for lending the church’s bus to law officers for a meth lab bust.

Chris Wilkinson said Wednesday he plans to resign as pastor of Morning Star Community Church at Hamlin. He says some church members were unhappy with his decision to let law enforcement use the bus.

Wilkinson is also Hamlin’s mayor and police chief. He says he has no regrets about lending the bus and would do it again.

Lincoln County chief sheriff’s deputy J.J. Napier says the church bus allowed officers to surprise the suspects.

Authorities made three arrests in last week’s bust. Napier says as officers piled out of the church bus, the reaction from the suspects was, “Oh God, they’ve got me.”

 

 

 

http://www.johnsoncitypress.com/article/110935/preacher-ousted-for-using-church-bus-as-trojan-horse-for-meth-raid

 

Chinese gangs are supplying Mexican drug cartels with chemicals to create meth, fueling an epidemic of drug use in the United States and drug wars in Mexico.  The shipments are tied to the Chinese Triads that have been increasingly exerting influence over Chinese communities.

A soldier stands guard inside a clandestine chemical drugs processing laboratory discovered in Mexico on Feb. 9, 2012. Chinese gangs are supplying Mexican drug cartels with chemicals to create methamphetamine

 

Methamphetamine, which goes by several other names including meth, crystal, and ice, gives its users a several-minute rush if injected, and a feeling of euphoria if snorted or swallowed. It is also extremely addictive, and causes severe paranoia and violent behavior.

Meth used to be easy to make. The chemicals required to create the drug were available at most local drug stores, and people running meth labs used those shops as their local suppliers.

Alarmed at the growing popularity of the drug, in 2004 the United States began regulating pseudoephedrine, a key ingredient in meth often found in cough medicine.

A January report from the Congressional Research Service showed that the number of meth labs in the United States dropped nearly fourfold until 2007. Then the number of labs began rapidly increasing.

While some labs were able to evade the ban by getting people to purchase regulated cough medicine used to create weaker versions of meth, shipments of pure pseudoephedrine were coming in quantity into Mexico from China.

“The Mexican cartels have been dominating this illicit market into the United States for years now. The type of precursor chemicals, their bulk amounts, and their origins make this a true smoking gun,” said Robert Bunker, a distinguished visiting professor and Minerva chair at the Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College.

Bunker noted that in 2011, the Mexican navy intercepted shipments from Shanghai bound for Mexico that contained 30 and 70 tons of methylamine, pseudoephedrine, and other chemicals that are precursors for meth.

Several other shipments have been seized, including in April 2012, when enough precursors to make $10 billion in meth were intercepted in Belize, heading to representatives of the Mexican drug cartel known as Los Zetas, from China according to China Brief, a publication of the Jamestown Foundation.

“In fact, an illicit triangle trade has existed for some time now with Chinese industry supplying precursor chemicals, cartel labs in Mexico creating the product, and narcotics users in the United States paying hard cash for it,” Bunker said.

According to several sources, including China Brief, the shipments are tied to the Chinese Triads that have been increasingly exerting influence over Chinese communities in the region as China’s influence expands in Latin America.

Meth precursors are only part of the business for the Chinese Triads in Latin America, according to the China Brief report. They also traffic humans, narcotics, and contraband, and engage in extortion and money laundering.

The nature of the Triads also ties them to the Chinese Communist Party back in their homeland, according to Kerry Patton, an expert on terrorism and intelligence, and author of “Contracted: America’s Secret Warriors.”

The Triads work through Chinese hometown or business associations called “Tongs.” Some are good, some are bad, but the Chinese Communist Party actively tries to bring them into its fold, and maintains control or influence over many, according to Patton.

“That’s just the way that the Triads, the Tongs, work,” Patton said. “They get their blessings from certain elements in the Chinese government.”

In Mexico, meth has fed violent drug wars, which, according to Human Rights Watch, have killed more than 60,000 people between 2006 and 2012.

In the United States, the effects of the meth trade are also being felt.

“That’s the worst drug you can use,” said Ernie Encinas, founder of Coastline Protection and Investigations, and a former vice and homicide detective in the San Diego Police Department.

He said aside from the violence meth use encourages, the effect on people’s bodies is shocking. “They pick at their skin, their scabs. And they age really quick—really quick. The hair falls out. It’s all hard chemicals they’re using. Their sinuses get all destroyed.”

Encinas said meth started becoming a problem in the 1990s. In San Diego, the first groups to get into it were the biker gangs, yet when the Mexican gangs got a hold of it, the drug that used to run close to $9,000 a pound suddenly became affordable. “They brought the prices way down to less than half the price of a pound.”

When the prices dropped, local law enforcement knew they had a problem on their hands, and not long after, “we cut off the pseudoephedrine,” he said. Yet rather than going away, the market shifted, and “you had to get it from Mexico.”

Encinas said, from what he has seen, the raw chemicals, rather than the finished product, come across the border into the United States, where people running makeshift labs then convert them into meth.

 

 

 

 

http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/285163-chinese-gangs-fuel-meth-scourge-in-us-mexico/?photo=2

 

 

Meth production is no doubt becoming a big problem across the country, and throughout the state. So it’s important to know what to look for to stop them.

A Meth lab is described as smelling like ammonia, ether, lighter fluid, auto parts cleaner, or rotten eggs.

Detective J.A. Vance with the Lewisburg police department say some things that people could be aware of are “to look for are excessive trash, obnoxious orders, commonly referred to as cat urine, the smell of cat urine. Strong ammonia smell or other chemical type smells.”

Aside from the smell, you’re also advised to look for unusual behavior. Especially if you see strangers coming and going all hours of the day or night.

It is common for labs to look like no one is home during the day. There may not be a home owner, or there is very little traffic during normal daytime hours. Lewisburg police say what you may see is “a lot of traffic that picks up late in the evening up into the early morning hours.”

Quite a bit of trash is generated to keep a meth lab running, so you might be able to detect one by looking at the garbage bins on trash days. “If a neighbor is able to notice certain types of containers in the trash,” says Vance “a lot of 2 liter soda bottles or other containers about that size are commonly used. As well as duck tape is a very common indicator of it. Especially when you put all those together.”

Also pay attention to any changes in behavior. The production of meth produces fumes that are very flammable or explosive, so a homeowner that use to smoke in their home but now comes outside could be a good indication that there is a production going on.

If you think you have detected a meth lab, it is your responsibility to report it because explosions and fires can often occur.

 

 

 

 

http://www.wvnstv.com/story/23406506/signs-you-have-a-meth-lab-in-your-neighborhood

 

 

ST. LOUIS — Methamphetamine lab seizures and arrests declined nationwide in 2012, but experts say they don’t yet know why, and some states are already reporting increases this year.

The Drug Enforcement Administration provided statistics to The Associated Press on Wednesday showing 12,694 meth lab incidents in 2012, down 5.5 percent from 13,390 in 2011. It was the second straight year of decline, but experts said it could just be a blip and it’s too early to tell if there’s a trend to explain the drop. The nation had 15,196 meth lab incidents in 2010.

Meth Lab Seizures_LaMo.jpg
Franklin County Detective Jason Grellner, center, sorts through evidence with Detective Darryl Balleydier, left, and reserve Officer Mark Holguin during a raid of a suspected meth house in Gerald, Mo. According to statistics from the Drug Enforcement Administration and released to The Associated Press on Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013, Missouri, the leader in meth lab incidents every year but one since 2003, again led the nation in lab seizures and arrests in 2012

Missouri, the leader in meth lab incidents every year but one since 2003, again topped the list with 1,960 incidents in 2012. One Missouri county alone — Jefferson County, near St. Louis — had 346 incidents.

In fact, Missouri and three other Middle America states combined for nearly half of all meth lab incidents. Tennessee was second with 1,701 incidents, followed by Indiana (1,697) and Kentucky (1,000).

DEA spokesman Rusty Payne noted the numbers could change as late-reporting states update their 2012 figures.

Payne said it was too soon to know if the declining number of incidents was a trend or why the number dropped. In fact, some states said they’re seeing a big rise this year.

Tom Farmer, director of the Tennessee Methamphetamine Task Force, said Tennessee is on pace for around 2,000 meth lab incidents in 2013. Indiana is on pace for nearly 1,900, said Niki Crawford, commander of Indiana’s Meth Suppression office.

Experts say the vast majority of homemade meth in the U.S. is now concocted by mixing pseudoephedrine and other ingredients in a soda bottle, the so called “one-pot” or “shake-and-bake” method. Unlike the more elaborate labs of yesteryear, one-pot typically creates just enough meth for the maker and perhaps a friend, not enough to sell.

Because one-pot meth can be made quickly and easily, often in a car, meth is becoming more common in urban and suburban areas. In Missouri, the top four counties for meth incidents were all in the St. Louis area.

“The one-pot method just makes it very simple to manufacture,” Missouri State Highway Patrol Capt. Tim Hull said.

A variety of meth-fighting efforts have had mixed success. The Combat Meth Act of 2005 requires cold and allergy pills containing pseudoephedrine to be sold from behind the counter. Pseudoephedrine purchases are tracked and buyers must show identification. The amount that can be purchased is limited. Two states — Oregon and Mississippi — require a prescription, as do more than 70 Missouri towns and counties.

Yet meth-makers continue to find ways around the law. Farmer said six people recently arrested at a meth operation in Overton County, Tenn., had a combined 77 fake identifications.

“Every one of those false IDs had purchased the maximum allowable amount of pseudoephedrine,” Farmer said.

The DEA’s El Paso Intelligence Center (EPIC) compiles meth lab seizure data. EPIC data showed that the top 16 states for meth lab incidents were all in Middle America or the South. Illinois was fifth with 799 incidents. The remainder of the top 10 were: Oklahoma (761), Ohio (683), Michigan (588), North Carolina (460) and South Carolina (446).

 

 

 

http://www.nola.com/news/index.ssf/2013/09/breaking_good_us_meth_lab_seiz.html#incart_river_default

 

 

In the last nine months, here in the Illinois, Quad Cities area, there have been 8 meth bust.

We spoke to a undercover drug agent who said- meth is definitely making a comeback.

“It is on the rise, we`re pretty much status quo from responding to the amount of labs we’ve had in the past but more and more, we are seeing newer faces involved in the meth lab,” the agent said.

With limited availability of psedoephedrin, a decongestant used to make meth, some meth-makers have found creative ways to make the the drug.

 

“The shake and bait method, they can have the whole bate, the whole cook will be in as little as a twenty ounce bottle or up to a liter or two liter bottle, plastic bottle of pop, they empty out the pop, put all the ingredients in there, a lot of time, we`ve receive information that guys are driving around while that cook is going.”

Another contributing factor to the rise of the meth is a process known as “smurfing”. A process that alleviates, meth-makers from purchasing psedoephedrin themselves.

“What guys are doing is what we cooks are doing, there actually asking their users, who are addicted to that drug and come to them for that drug- to go and buy pills.”

But despite the recent surge of meth lab bust, police are realistic about combating the drug.

“I’m optimistic but I mean as long as there`s a way to get high, I think people are going to find a way to do it.”

 For now meth doesn’t appear to be going anywhere, anytime soon. And police don’t appear to be giving up the fight.

 

 

 

http://wqad.com/2013/09/11/meth-is-making-a-comeback-in-the-quad-cities/

 

 

Officials have concluded their investigation into what caused the death of a Los Osos man, who drove his truck off a Pismo Beach cliff in July.

Pismo Beach Police say toxicology results show Sean Ramirez had a high level of methamphetamine in his system when the July 9 accident occurred.

 

Police say the investigation shows Ramirez, 33, died from blunt force trauma after his pickup truck veered off the road north of Price Street and went over the cliff onto the beach just south of the Best Western Shelter Cove Lodge.

Police say prior to his truck going over the cliff, several 911 calls were made from people reporting Ramirez was driving erratically.

Pismo Beach Police Department investigators and San Luis Obispo County Sheriff’s Office Detective Coroner investigators ruled the July incident accidental.

The contributing cause of the crash was due to driving under the influence, according to police, after they say the toxicology results showed the high level of methamphetamine.

 

 

 

 

http://www.ksby.com/news/police-high-level-of-methamphetamine-in-system-when-los-osos-man-drove-off-pismo-beach-cliff-in-july/

 

 

A routine traffic stop, precipitated by a faulty license plate light, resulted in the arrest of three suspects on drug and gun charges late Tuesday night, Greencastle City Police reported.

During the traffic stop about 11:30 p.m. on the Clark gasoline station lot at Washington and Locust streets, city officers discovered 205 grams of methamphetamine (nearly a half-pound), two loaded handguns and approximately $1,700 in cash.

Subsequently arrested and lodged in the Putnam County Jail, pending a scheduled hearing in Putnam Superior Court Friday, were:

– Cody Gibson, 28, Bainbridge.

– Daniel Sparks, 26, Camby.

– Cheyanne N. Waller, 19, Cloverdale.

All three are being charged with dealing in methamphetamine and possession of methamphetamine, while Gibson and Sparks also face charges of possession of a handgun without a permit.

The incident unfolded as GPD Officer Matt Huffman was southbound on North Jackson Street behind a black 2003 Ford pickup truck that he noticed had an inoperable license plate light as Gibson turned the vehicle eastbound onto Washington Street.

After he pulled the vehicle over, Huffman noted nervousness on the part of all three occupants, especially Sparks in the front passenger seat.

When the officer approached the car, neither Sparks nor Waller was able to produced identification. Gibson, however, provided both license and registration.

In a pat-down search of Sparks, the officer felt “what appeared to be a large quantity of currency in his right front shorts pocket,” the probable cause affidavit noted. It was later discovered Sparks was carrying $1,757 in cash.

Huffman was also suspicious that there might be guns in the vehicle as Sgt. Charles Inman and Officer Nick Eastham arrived on the scene to assist in a possible search of the truck.

“You’re not searching it, you don’t have probable cause,” Gibson responded to Huffman’s request to search the truck, court records show.

Police then called for a K9 unit, and Deputy Phillip Troyer and his dog responded. The K9 soon produced a positive alert on the vehicle, prompting a police search of the truck by Huffman and Eastham.

Almost immediately, Eastham located a Gerber Good Start baby formula container partially wedged under the front seat. Inside the container, officers found a blue handkerchief, an Indiana driver’s license belonging to Sparks and 14 plastic baggies containing “a white, crystallized and powdery substance” later identified as methamphetamine.

The 205 grams of meth recovered was listed as having a street value of $5,772 in the probable cause affidavit.

Also discovered in the container were 25 rounds of ammunition, while a fully loaded .25-caliber Raven Arms handgun was found nearby.

Further search of the vehicle produced a Smith & Wesson Bodyguard 380 handgun holding six bullets with one round already chambered, the report noted.

Under questioning, Sparks told officers he had stolen the methamphetamine and the .25-caliber handgun earlier in the day from a residence on the west side of Indianapolis, the court document noted.

The suspects are currently being held in the Putnam County Jail, pending their initial court hearing.

 

 

 

http://www.bannergraphic.com/story/2002811.html

 

 

STORM LAKE, Iowa | Two people were arrested Wednesday in Storm Lake after a six-month investigation into the manufacturing of methamphetamine.

Storm Lake police said in a statement that Nina Zebley, 35, of Fort Dodge, Iowa, and David Botine, 50, of Alta, Iowa, were arrested in the parking lot of a business on North Lake Avenue after they were observed purchasing ingredients used to manufacture meth.

Police found in the pair’s vehicle additional ingredients used to manufacture meth, a pipe and a white powdery substance which tested positive for meth, police said.

Inside Zebley’s purse officers also found several prescription drugs, marijuana, meth, a scale and several pipes, according to a police news release.

Storm Lake police and Buena Vista County deputies then conducted a search at Botine’s residence where they located and seized meth, marijuana and drug paraphernalia, police said.

Zebley was charged with three felony charges, conspiracy to manufacture methamphetamine and two counts of possession of precursors with intent to manufacture; and six misdemeanors, possession of methamphetamine, possession of marijuana, possession of hydrocodone, possession of Vyvance, possession of Alprazolam and possession of drug paraphernalia.

Botine was charged with two felonies, conspiracy to manufacture methamphetamine and possession of precursors with intent to manufacture; and two misdemeanors, possession of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia.

Police said additional arrests are expected.

 

 

 

http://siouxcityjournal.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/two-face-felony-drug-charges-in-storm-lake/article_92d64806-948f-5273-b9ef-853e9b788e0c.html

 

 

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Methamphetamine lab seizures and arrests declined nationwide in 2012, but experts say they don’t yet know why, and some states are already reporting increases this year.

The Drug Enforcement Administration provided statistics to The Associated Press on Wednesday showing 12,694 meth lab incidents in 2012, down 5.5 percent from 13,390 in 2011. It was the second straight year of decline, but experts said it could just be a blip and it’s too early to tell if there’s a trend to explain the drop. The nation had 15,196 meth lab incidents in 2010.

Graphic shows 2012 meth lab seizures by state and total seizures by year.

Graphic shows 2012 meth lab seizures by state and total seizures by year.

 

 

Missouri, the leader in meth lab incidents every year but one since 2003, again topped the list with 1,960 incidents in 2012. One Missouri county alone — Jefferson County, near St. Louis — had 346 incidents.

In fact, Missouri and three other Middle America states combined for nearly half of all meth lab incidents. Tennessee was second with 1,701 incidents, followed by Indiana (1,697) and Kentucky (1,000).

DEA spokesman Rusty Payne noted the numbers could change as late-reporting states update their 2012 figures.

Payne said it was too soon to know if the declining number of incidents was a trend or why the number dropped. In fact, some states said they’re seeing a big rise this year.

Tom Farmer, director of the Tennessee Methamphetamine Task Force, said Tennessee is on pace for around 2,000 meth lab incidents in 2013. Indiana is on pace for nearly 1,900, said Niki Crawford, commander of Indiana’s Meth Suppression office.

Experts say the vast majority of homemade meth in the U.S. is now concocted by mixing pseudoephedrine and other ingredients in a soda bottle, the so called “one-pot” or “shake-and-bake” method. Unlike the more elaborate labs of yesteryear, one-pot typically creates just enough meth for the maker and perhaps a friend, not enough to sell.

FILE - In this Sept. 2, 2010 file photo, Franklin County Detective Jason Grellner, center, sorts through evidence with Detective Darryl Balleydier, left, and reserve Officer Mark Holguin during a raid of a suspected meth house in Gerald, Mo.

Franklin County Detective Jason Grellner, center, sorts through evidence with Detective Darryl Balleydier, left, and reserve Officer Mark Holguin during a raid of a suspected meth house in Gerald, Mo.

Because one-pot meth can be made quickly and easily, often in a car, meth is becoming more common in urban and suburban areas. In Missouri, the top four counties for meth incidents were all in the St. Louis area.

“The one-pot method just makes it very simple to manufacture,” Missouri State Highway Patrol Capt. Tim Hull said.

A variety of meth-fighting efforts have had mixed success. The Combat Meth Act of 2005 requires cold and allergy pills containing pseudoephedrine to be sold from behind the counter. Pseudoephedrine purchases are tracked and buyers must show identification. The amount that can be purchased is limited. Two states — Oregon and Mississippi — require a prescription, as do more than 70 Missouri towns and counties.

Yet meth-makers continue to find ways around the law. Farmer said six people recently arrested at a meth operation in Overton County, Tenn., had a combined 77 fake identifications.

“Every one of those false IDs had purchased the maximum allowable amount of pseudoephedrine,” Farmer said.

The DEA’s El Paso Intelligence Center (EPIC) compiles meth lab seizure data. EPIC data showed that the top 16 states for meth lab incidents were all in Middle America or the South. Illinois was fifth with 799 incidents. The remainder of the top 10 were: Oklahoma (761), Ohio (683), Michigan (588), North Carolina (460) and South Carolina (446).

 

 

 

http://www.ksn.com/2013/09/11/meth-lab-seizures-down-in-2012/

 

 

 

YORK COUNTY, S.C. — A York County home where authorities said two people were cooking methamphetamine burst into flames Wednesday.
Neighbors of the mobile home on Shannon Meadows Road near Rhyne Road outside Clover called Eyewitness News when they saw crews in hazmat suits at the scene. They said they heard a loud explosion shortly before 10 p.m. and then found the road blocked for hours.

Neighbors said they thought the house was vacant.

“I seen a bright light then I said, ‘They got power, must be moving back,’ and then I looked on out a little bit and I said, ‘Oh my Lord, the house is on fire,’” said neighbor Darlene Childers.

“The whole side was engulfed in flames,” said neighbor James Carle.

Neighbors called 911 and when emergency crews arrived, they found Kacey Stiles, 36, and Doyle Dailey, 51, lying in the middle of the street. Officials said Dailey had serious burns to his hands and was taken to a hospital.

When an Eyewitness News crew arrived, teams in hazmat gear were collecting bags of evidence from the yard.

Investigators said two people who were being allowed to stay in the home were cooking meth when it exploded and caught the mobile home on fire.

Stiles and Dailey, of Gastonia, were charged with manufacturing methamphetamine.
An incident report stated Dailey and Stiles emptied their pockets and Stiles handed investigators several ephedrine pills, which is a key ingredient in meth.
Stiles told detectives he only came to the house to deliver a soda to Dailey, but eventually investigators charged both men. “I just don’t like hearing there’s a meth lab in my neighborhood. That’s disturbing,” Carle said.
The neighbors who called 911 said they are happy the fire didn’t spread. A York County home where authorities said two people were cooking methamphetamine burst into flames Wednesday.
Neighbors of the mobile home on Shannon Meadows Road near Rhyne Road outside Clover called Eyewitness News when they saw crews in hazmat suits at the scene. They said they heard a loud explosion shortly before 10 p.m. and then found the road blocked for hours.
Neighbors said they thought the house was vacant.
“I seen a bright light then I said, ‘They got power, must be moving back,’ and then I looked on out a little bit and I said, ‘Oh my Lord, the house is on fire,’” said neighbor Darlene Childers.
“The whole side was engulfed in flames,” said neighbor James Carle.
Neighbors called 911 and when emergency crews arrived, they found Kacey Stiles, 36, and Doyle Dailey, 51, lying in the middle of the street. Officials said Dailey had serious burns to his hands and was taken to a hospital.
When an Eyewitness News crew arrived, teams in hazmat gear were collecting bags of evidence from the yard.
Investigators said two people who were being allowed to stay in the home were cooking meth when it exploded and caught the mobile home on fire.
Stiles and Dailey, of Gastonia, were charged with manufacturing methamphetamine.
An incident report stated Dailey and Stiles emptied their pockets and Stiles handed investigators several ephedrine pills, which is a key ingredient in meth.
Stiles told detectives he only came to the house to deliver a soda to Dailey, but eventually investigators charged both men. “I just don’t like hearing there’s a meth lab in my neighborhood. That’s disturbing,” Carle said.
The neighbors who called 911 said they are happy the fire didn’t spread.

NICEVILLE — Two men were arrested Tuesday and charged with trafficking methamphetamine after members of the Okaloosa County Multi-Agency Drug Task Force executed a search warrant on their Spencer Place home.

The search revealed more than 500 grams of suspected methamphetamine, according to the men’s Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office arrest report.

told investigators he purchased pseudoephedrine several days earlier from a local pharmacy. He also said he is still a meth user, according to his arrest report.

meth bust

Bagent’s roommate, 38-year-old Arden Lee Stanley, told authorities he is currently on probation for possession of a controlled substance. He also said he had been cooking meth every day since October 2012, except for the 90 days he spent in jail, according to his arrest report.

Stanley also described, in detail, how he made methamphetamine and claimed ownership for all of the contraband in the residence. He also said he regularly trades boxes of pseudoephedrine for methamphetamine.

Both men are scheduled to appear in court Oct. 15.

 

 

http://www.nwfdailynews.com/local/suspect-i-ve-been-cooking-meth-every-day-1.200919

 

 

CHINA GROVE, NC (WBTV) – Two suspected meth labs were found by deputies in a China Grove home Wednesday morning.

Investigators with the Rowan Sheriff’s Office and the SBI searched a rental house on Beth Drive just after 10 am.  Fire and rescue stood by while the dangerous so called “one pot” labs were dismantled.

 

Nicholas Cody Baker, 26, and Sharon Lewis Bruce, 42, were charged.  Both have prior criminal records involving similar crimes.

Baker was out on bond from a January 2013, arrest in Iredell County for the sale of methamphetamine.  Bruce has a previous federal methamphetamine conviction in Virginia.

 

The search was based on information obtained by the Rowan County Sheriff’s Office and the Salisbury Police Department that some occupants of the home were cooking methamphetamine.

During the course of the search, investigators discovered (2) one-pot methamphetamine laboratories in a bathroom.

Nicholas Baker was charged with manufacturing methamphetamine, maintaining a dwelling, possession of precursor chemicals, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of methamphetamine.

Sharon Bruce was charged with maintaining a dwelling, possession of precursor chemicals, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of methamphetamine.  Baker and Bruce were each placed under a $15,000 secured bond.

Assisting in the site safety were the Bostian Heights Fire Department and the Rowan County EMS.

 

 

 

http://www.wbtv.com/story/23405672/two-charged-in-china-grove-meth-lab-bust

 

 

CHICAGO — It has been six decades since doctors concluded that addiction was a disease that could be treated, but today the condition still dwells on the fringes of the medical community. Only 1 cent of every health care dollar in the United States goes toward addiction, and few alcoholics and drug addicts receive treatment. One huge barrier, according to many experts, has been a lack of health insurance.

But that barrier crumbles in less than a year.  In a major break with the past, 4 million people with drug and alcohol problems — from homeless drug addicts to working moms who drink too much — suddenly will become eligible for insurance coverage under the new health care overhaul.

The number of people seeking treatment could double over current levels, depending on how many states decide to expand their Medicaid programs and how many addicts choose to take advantage of the new opportunity, according to an Associated Press analysis of government data. The analysis compared federal data on the addiction rates in the 50 states, the capacity of treatment programs and the provisions of the new health law.
The surge in patients is expected to push a marginal part of the health care system out of church basements and into the mainstream of medical care. Already, the prospect of more paying patients has prompted private equity firms to increase their investments in addiction treatment companies, according to a market research firm. And families fighting the affliction are beginning to consider a new avenue for help.

“There is no illness currently being treated that will be more affected by the Affordable Care Act than addiction,” said Tom McLellan, CEO of the nonprofit Treatment Research Institute and President Barack Obama’s former deputy drug czar. “That’s because we have a system of treatment that was built for a time when they didn’t understand that addiction was an illness.”

But those eager for a new chance at sobriety may be surprised by the reality behind the promise. The system for treating substance abuse — now largely publicly funded and run by counselors with limited medical training — is small and already full to overflowing in many places. In more than two-thirds of the states, treatment clinics are already at or approaching 100 percent capacity.

The new demand could swamp the system before even half of the newly insured show up at the door, causing waiting lists of months or longer, treatment agencies say. In recent years, many rehab centers have been shrinking rather than growing because of government budget cuts for patients who receive public support.

“Advocates just get so excited, but at some point, reality is going to hit and they’ll find it’s not all it was cracked up to be,” said Josh Archambault of the Pioneer Institute, a nonpartisan public policy research center in Boston.

In the coming years, treatment programs and medical colleges will face pressure to ramp up to create a larger system.

But until then, addiction treatment may represent an extreme example of one of the Affordable Care Act’s challenges: actually delivering the care that people are supposed to receive.

Many with substance problems are waiting eagerly for January, when the new insurance will become available.

“It’s the chance to clean up and not use anymore, so I could live a stable life,” said 30-year-old Ashley Lore of Portsmouth, Ohio, who was jailed and lost custody of her 4-year-old daughter as a result of her heroin addiction. “If I get into treatment, I get visitation to my daughter back. And I get her back after I complete treatment.”

Only about 10 percent of the 23 million Americans with alcohol or drug problems now receive treatment, according to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Shame and stigma are part of the reason but about a quarter of them don’t have insurance coverage. That compares with the overall uninsured rate of 16 percent.

With money for treatment limited, slots in rehabilitation centers and hospitals are scarce. In Minnesota, which has one of the higher substance abuse rates in the nation — 11.6 percent of the population — there are slightly more than 3,900 inpatient beds for the 491,000 people who need treatment, according to federal data. Occupancy is over 100 percent.

Insurance can mean the difference between getting a spot or waiting indefinitely for publicly subsidized help.

Michelle Hines, an Illinois mother, had both experiences when her 19-year-old son became part of a disturbing new trend: suburban teenagers hooked on heroin.

Because he was uninsured, the wait would stretch to a month or six weeks for a public bed. His parents, who own a small business, couldn’t afford the $2,000-per-month injections to block the heroin high. Overall, outpatient programs cost about $10,000, and a residential treatment stay about $28,000.

Everything changed after her son was able to get coverage under the family’s insurance plan because of an early benefit of the Affordable Care Act.

They now pay only $40 a month for the shot that helps him stay clean. “He’s working hard at getting his life back together,” Hines said. “He’s in school full time; he’s got a job.” (Michelle Hines asked that her son’s name be withheld to avoid hurting his future employment prospects.)

Nine alumni of Hines’ son’s high school have died from drug overdoses. “A waiting list for a heroin addict could mean death,” Hines said. “So many have died waiting, it’s awful.”

Today, those without insurance include many lower- and middle-income people who don’t get the benefit from an employer — businesses provide coverage for about 50 percent of Americans — don’t qualify for Medicaid or Medicare and can’t afford their own policies.

The new law would provide subsidies to help many buy private coverage. The government is also pressing states to expand their Medicaid programs to include more working poor people. If 24 states expand their Medicaid programs — roughly the number now planning to do so — an additional 4 million prospective patients with addiction problems would get insurance, according to the AP analysis. If virtually all of the states eventually decide to expand, as federal officials predict, the ranks of the newly insured with addiction problems could reach 5.5 million.

Perhaps as important as the expansion, the new law designates addiction treatment as an “essential health benefit” for most commercial plans.

“This is probably the most profound change we’ve had in drug policy ever,” said Michael Botticelli, deputy director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy. “We know one of the most significant reasons for the treatment gap is folks who don’t have insurance or who have an inadequate coverage package for substance use disorders.”

Here’s a quick way to catch up on the week’s news, through some of our favorite photos.

But will those who suddenly get coverage for treatment have a place to get it?
Haymarket Center in Chicago illustrates what may await many addicts. One Friday morning, seven men slumped in chairs in a small, bare room with only an untouched rack of health brochures to break the monotony of waiting for the chance of a detox bed that night. The six-story brick building is a beehive of programs for 300-plus patients: short term detox, long-term residential treatment, recovery units where people can live sober while looking for work. Everything is overbooked. On this day, the waiting list totaled 91 people who want help.

“Last year the state cut our dollars so we had to cut back our beds,” said Dan Lustig, vice president of Haymarket, which gets most of its funding from the government. “We had clients literally pleading for services. Some were sleeping on our front steps.”

In Illinois, where 92,000 people get treatment now, nearly 235,000 addicts and alcoholics without insurance will be able to get coverage next year. Not only beds are lacking. The pool of physicians who are addiction specialists must grow by 3,000 nationwide, almost double what it is now, to handle the demand, according to health industry experts.

“The big question for providers is how do we bridge the gap between now and then?” said Bruce Angleman of Heritage Behavioral Health Center, which provides treatment in Decatur, in central Illinois.

There are also questions about how comprehensive and affordable the new coverage will be.  Consumers or their employers who choose cheaper policies with high out-of-pocket costs may find themselves unable to afford their share of an expensive program.

The future ideal may end up looking something like the care Shavonne Bullock receives in a neighborhood clinic in Chicago, the metro area with the highest rate of heroin-related emergency room visits. Seven years into her recovery, Bullock, a 54-year-old former heroin addict, still gets counseling and takes medication— “my blessing” she calls it — at the Access Community Health Network clinic to suppress withdrawal symptoms and reduce craving.

Her doctors and counselors work together. They recognize that addiction is a chronic condition, like diabetes, that needs maintenance.

“I haven’t thought about drugs in seven years,” she said. Treatment, she said, “works if you work it. It’s all up to the individual. And it really works.”

 

 

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/millions-more-to-get-coverage-for-addiction-alcoholism-treatment-but-can-the-system-deliver/2013/09/11/961943ac-1b0b-11e3-80ac-96205cacb45a_story.html

 

 

FAYETTEVILLE, AR– A Fayetteville woman is in jail accused of using and selling drugs near her kids.

Police say they were called to Rhawnie Palmer’s apartment Thursday after human services reported suspicion that Palmer was selling and using methamphetamine in the home in the presence of her three children.

After searching the apartment, police say they found meth, meth pipes and marijuana in the home.

She denied selling the drugs but admitted to police that she smoked meth and marijuana in the apartment.

Palmer faces charges of possession with intent to deliver and endangering the welfare of a minor.

 

 

 

http://www.nwahomepage.com/fulltext-news/police-woman-used-sold-meth-in-home-with-kids/d/fulltext-news/ltVkvyF8tkK8hYRTiPvv3g

 

 

Sept. 7

• U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers referred Adan Segoviano-Gutierrez, 34, for an additional inspection of his GMC truck at the Dennis DeConcini Port of Entry. After a drug-sniffing dog alerted to the presence of narcotics underneath a plastic bed liner, officers removed almost 35 pounds of meth worth more than $538,000.

• Officers referred Juan Salomon Orozco-Bojorquez, 26, for additional inspection of his Dodge truck at the Mariposa Port of Entry. After a drug-sniffing dog alerted to the dashboard area, officers removed almost 17 pounds of meth from inside of a hidden compartment in the firewall of the truck. The stash was worth nearly $256,000.

Sept. 5

• U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers referred a 21-year-old Mexican national for an additional inspection of his Dodge truck at the Dennis DeConcini Port of Entry. After a drug-sniffing dog alerted to the bench seat, officers removed five packages of meth worth more than $77,700. The drugs were hidden within a tubular back support cylinder.

Meth 2

 

 

 

Sept. 3

• CBP officers at the DeConcini port arrested a 23-year-old Tucson man after a drug-sniffing dog alerted to his Lincoln sedan. More than 14 pounds of meth, valued at nearly $221,000, were then removed from the car’s rear bumper.

• A 19-year-old Mexican man was arrested at the same port after he attempted to enter the United States with more than 19 pounds of cocaine in his Oldsmobile van. The drugs were hidden in the interior rear quarter panels of the van and were also sniffed out by a CBP dog. The coke was valued at more than $175,000.

• Also at DeConcini, a 34-year-old woman and 30-year-old man, both from Phoenix, were arrested after a drug detection canine alerted to the sliding door of their Chrysler van, and officers removed more than 11 pounds of methamphetamine estimated to be worth more than $175,000.

Meth 1

 

 

Aug. 31

• Officers at the Mariposa Port of Entry’s commercial facility found nearly 245 pounds of marijuana within compartments inside the back of a tractor-trailer that appeared empty. They also discovered more than 85 pounds of methamphetamine and nearly six pounds of heroin, bringing the combined value of the seizure to more than $1.5 million. The driver, a 35-year-old Mexican man, was arrested.

• At the Dennis DeConcini Port of Entry, a 26-year-old Mexican woman was taken into custody after a CBP drug-sniffing dog led its human partners to a nearly 10-pound stash of methamphetamine in the rear bumper of her Dodge sedan. The meth was valued at more than $154,000.

http://www.nogalesinternational.com/news/ports-and-border-lots-of-meth-seized-at-local-ports/article_4192e034-1c93-11e3-afc5-001a4bcf887a.html

GRAMMER, Ind. — Six years after kicking a long addiction to methamphetamine, Jason Paul Newman remains a man trapped by his past.

The 38-year-old, who lives in the small unincorporated town of Grammer in southeastern Bartholomew County, knows his strengths.

He’s a seasoned construction worker, a trained computer technician, an experienced landscaper and a meticulous wood craftsman.

But he’s also a man willing to address his weaknesses: an addictive personality, a 16-year meth addiction, a lifetime of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and, as he puts it, “someone who grew up with a real smart-mouth.”

While expressing a strong desire to improve himself, Newman said he has no idea how to earn trust and forgiveness from a society that brands him with two haunting labels from his past: Thief and meth addict.

“When I see what I did, I’m not proud of it,” Newman told The Republic (http://bit.ly/17UiEfb ). “I lost all of my teeth and quite a few brain cells due to meth. But I’m not a bad guy. I’m just a man who has made some mistakes.”

So far, Newman has not been able to find an employer willing to give him a stable job and a second chance.

“He’s been down a lot,” said Ellen Newman, his wife of 16 years and the mother of three of his four children. “He gets really down on the job situation.”

But Jason Newman said he refuses to regress to his former lifestyle as he strives to make money as a freelance worker doing odd jobs in construction, landscaping and wood crafting.

His message to those who still hold the old labels against him is simple:

“I’m done completely with meth.

“Give me a chance to show you it ain’t happening again.”

Tragedy first struck Jason Newman at the age of nine months when his father was struck and killed in a car-pedestrian accident.

His mother, Sue, married Keith Gilbert when Jason was 7. After finding himself in a strict home environment, Jason said he began to rebel.

“When you are outraged, sometimes you do things you don’t mean to do,” he said.

While he had promised himself he would never take stimulants as his friends did, that conviction changed during his junior year of high school.

“While I wasn’t looking, a couple of buddies put meth in my coffee,” Newman said. “Once I learned what they did, I liked the effect. Meth gives you infinite energy. You are just continuously go-go-go.”

Newman said the drug began to alter his already-hyperactive brain, deceiving him into believing that he had extraordinary abilities.

“It made me feel like I was Superman,” Newman said. “I didn’t feel that there was anything wrong with me. In fact, I felt like I could conquer the world.”

After learning he was going to become a teenage father, Newman took a minimum-wage job at a fast-food restaurant that required him to walk almost six miles a day round-trip and put in eight-hour shifts. While his parents promised to buy him a car if he kept the job for a year, the wait seemed like forever to the 16-year-old.

The job of taking orders for burgers lasted one week before Newman purchased a cellphone and began taking orders of a different kind.

“People would call up and say: ‘Here’s where a car stereo is at. Can you get it for me? I’ll give you 50 bucks.’ And I was thinking: ‘Hey, that’s a free 50 bucks. Food, party-time, easy money.’”

He became a thief. For a while, Newman thought he could both party hearty and have money, he said. But as most of his family slept one night, his mother answered a knock on the door. What happened next led to his discovery that quick, easy money brings long, hard consequences.

“Four cops came through the front and back door, walked into my room and arrested me while I was asleep,” Newman said. “They handcuffed and shackled me in front of my family before hauling me away. That’s when I was first charged with theft and attempted theft.”

Newman was first sent to a juvenile detention center in Johnson County, where a search turned up some LSD. After refusing to take a mandatory drug test, Newman spent two months in solitary confinement before being waived into adult court, where he was ordered to spend a year in the Bartholomew County Jail.

He was behind bars when his oldest daughter was born to a former girlfriend in 1993. While he saw the baby briefly when she was 2 weeks old, Newman didn’t see much of her for the next three years. He spent the first year of her life in and out of the county jail for parole violations, followed by a two-year prison stint.

As part of his restitution, Newman performed 500 hours of janitorial work at Columbus City Hall when he was 19.

Believing the teen had committed only a misdemeanor, a supervisor offered Newman a full-time job. But the offer was rescinded when the supervisor learned Newman was an ex-felon.

Newman was optimistic the Army might provide him a way to start a normal life.

“But they said, ‘Nope,’” Newman said. “‘You have a felony, and you have tattoos.’”

Visible tattoos on the face, neck and head of recruits are prohibited, according to the U.S. Army’s website.

With the military option gone, Newman enrolled in a state-funded, two-year program for certification in computer maintenance and information technology. It was during this period of his life that he met Ellen, his wife-to-be.

Although he completed the course work, Newman was informed by school officials that his criminal record would prevent him from using his computer skills to get a good job.

Feeling there was no other option, Newman went to work for his brother’s construction company in 2003 and increasingly turned toward meth as a way to cope with the heavy physical demands of the job.

“By 2004, I was doing three-and-a-half grams a day,” Newman said. “I was playing a game with a friend concerning who could stay awake the longest. I had tried to stay up for 31 consecutive nights when my body shut down, and I wrecked a van. Flipped it nine times end-over-end.”

As a result of that accident, his wife first became aware of his drug addiction, Newman said. A decision was made to attempt a fresh start in another state, but the move south didn’t turn out as well as they had hoped.

The family had just returned from spending a year in Kentucky when Newman was arrested at a local department store in June 2007 on a warrant for failure to pay child support for his oldest child. When officers frisked him, they pulled drugs out of his wallet — in clear view of his other three children.

Ellen Newman said she reached the end of her rope when her husband criticized his court-ordered drug treatment while continuing to use drugs in the home they shared with their children.

“I told Jason you can have me or the drugs. You can’t have both,” she said.

Ellen Newman said she then packed her bags and left with the children with every intention to never return.

Jason Newman, who believed he had lost everything that made his life worth living, initially went on a rampage throughout his home.

But after the anger was replaced by two months of lonesome seclusion, something finally clicked in Jason Newman’s drug-addled brain.

“I was ruining my body, killing myself, playing Russian roulette with meth,” Newman said. “That’s when it finally set in that I wanted to quit — for myself.”

It took a lot of coaxing before Ellen Newman seriously considered her husband’s pleas to reunite. She finally agreed to come back only after Jason Newman consented not only to get off drugs but to give her complete control of his recovery.

“For over two years, she didn’t let me out of her sight,” Jason Newman said. “After that, she wouldn’t let me go anywhere alone unless she knew where I was going and liked what I would be doing. I think it was five years before she started to gradually let me go out on my own.”

While he first attempted to substitute prescribed medicines, and later, whiskey, for meth, Newman eventually had to give up both to avoid a new addiction.

Hurt and anger resurfaced when visiting friends accused Newman of being completely under his wife’s relentless thumb. But eventually, he realized it was those same type of taunting friends who helped turn him into a meth addict in the first place.

“I cannot, to this day, associate with anyone who uses meth,” Newman said. “If I do, I will use it. So I lost all of my friends.”

After the 2008 recession forced his brother’s construction company to close, Newman also lost his last steady job.

As he approaches 40, Newman is feeling the physical toll that years of abuse has taken on his mind and body. The desire for a meth fix still remains. And even though he’s led a drug-free life for six years, Newman remains frustrated by at least three prevailing conditions that he believes prevent him from having a stable future:

Indiana law allows employers to ask about criminal convictions and run background checks prior to hiring.

The 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act prohibits anyone convicted of a federal or state drug-related felony from receiving food stamps and many other forms of assistance.

Unless pregnant or disabled, the vast majority of paroled felons have no health insurance, and many wait several years to become eligible for even limited life insurance coverage, according to research by the Pew Charitable Trusts.

During a recent evaluation by a family counselor at the United Way Center, Newman was told he was at an extremely high risk level for stress, which increases the odds he’ll eventually return to drugs.

“Every day that goes by that I’m looking for that next job; that’s stress I don’t want,” Newman said.

Nevertheless, Newman is vowing to stay crime-free and drug-free, largely to keep his mother, stepfather, wife and children in his life.

“If I were to do (meth) again, they’d all walk away and have nothing to do with me,” said Newman, who insists his wife and mother have provided the only long-term support and stability he’s known.

Another reason for staying out of trouble was that those closest to him can tell when he’s not telling the truth, Newman said. His greatest concern is the knowledge that his family may never fully trust him again, Newman said.

“It upsets me at times that they always know when I’m lying and constantly watch me,” Newman said. “But I’ve gotta admit: They keep me on the straight and narrow.”

The indelible memory of his children’s faces, as they witnessed his 2007 arrest, is perhaps their father’s strongest defense against returning to a life of addiction.

“The disappointment on the kids’ faces that day really made him think,” Ellen Newman said.

“When they pulled the drugs out of my wallet, my kids just gave me a look that let me know they were disgusted with me,” Jason Newman said. “It tore me apart. All I need is to remember their faces, and I know I will never use (meth) again.”

While Ellen Newman currently works more than 50 hours a week at a Columbus area manufacturer, she insists she will continue to stand by her husband — as long as he remains drug- and crime-free. She is convinced that her husband is worthy of her investment.

“He’s a loving, caring husband and father,” Ellen Newman said. “Jason will do anything to make us happy.”

COLON TOWNSHIP, MI – Two females were arrested after two meth labs were found at a residence in Colon Township Friday, police said.

St. Joseph County Area Narcotics investigators were given a tip about meth production in the 28000 block of Bonham Road in Colon Township, police said. Courtesy photo

According to a news release from the St. Joseph County Sheriff’s Office, St. Joseph County Area Narcotics investigators were given a tip about meth production in the 28000 block of Bonham Road.

Colon Township meth lab

 

They found a one-pot active meth lab, a second inactive lab, several packages of finished meth product and evidence of meth use in the home when they executed the search warrant, police said.

The females were arrested at the scene and lodged at the St. Joseph County Jail on charges of operating and maintaining a meth lab, possession of meth, maintaining a drug house and felony firearms. Police are seeking charges for a man that was not at the house during the search.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.mlive.com/news/kalamazoo/index.ssf/2013/09/two_meth_labs_found_at_colon_t.html

 

The property manager showed a woman who was interested in renting the place the kitchen, the master bedroom and the family room before they headed down into the basement.

The man hiding under the stairs — who prosecutors say broke in to cook meth — startled them.

Willard Gourley The 31-year- old has been charged with burglary and manufac- turing meth.

 Willard Gourley The 31-year- old has been charged with burglary and manufacturing meth

The woman and the property manager quickly left.

The man, later identified by police as 31-year-old Willard Gourley, allegedly fled into the nearby woods.

Police arrived at the home, 3112 E. Gasconade St. in Springfield, to find meth lab components spread out underneath the staircase.

Gourley was later found, arrested and charged Wednesday with burglary and manufacturing meth.

Wearing biohazard suits and respirators, officers dismantled the suspected red phosphorus lab, a cooking method known to produce deadly phosphine gas. The chemical concoctions were sent to a hazardous materials bunker and will be shipped to an industrial storage facility. As for the home, the cleanup process is far less clear.

No state or local statute requires that the home be cleaned at all. Homeowners and landlords are required by state law to disclose meth lab activity to potential buyers or tenants if they are aware that the property was used to make meth.

The out-of-town owner of the Gasconade Street home could not be reached by the News-Leader on Friday, but the property manager was contacted by phone.

Katie Yates, of Brax Property Management, said the company had been hired by the homeowner days earlier with the task of finding a tenant by Oct. 1.

“As far as we stand, the owner is responsible for the cleanup,” Yates said.

Yates said the homeowner will remain as a client for the property manager, provided he is willing to dish out for significant cleanup costs.

“Exactly what would happen, I couldn’t say without proper testing, but our standards would be very high,” Yates said.

The goal of the husband-and-wife-run company, Yates said, is to manage properties that they would want to live in.

“And we wouldn’t want to live in a house that was a ‘meth house’ unless it was cleaned really, really well,” she said.

A News-Leader investigation published in March revealed hundreds of houses have been used to manufacture meth in Springfield, but no comprehensive effort exists to ensure those homes have been cleaned of hazardous remnants.

In properties where meth has been manufactured, researchers have found chemicals can linger long after the “cook” is over. Those experts say there is evidence that people who move into these spaces can suffer respiratory and possibly neurological problems.

State and federal guidelines are available to help homeowners decontaminate property, and the steps to take vary — from cleaning surfaces to gutting the house. Depending on contamination levels, appropriate remediation can cost thousands of dollars.

Over the last three years in Springfield, meth labs have been found in more than 81 houses, 22 apartments and 22 hotel and motel guest rooms, according to a News-Leader review of police data.

Of those dwellings, some decontamination actions were taken on 31 properties.

So-called remediation laws are enforced in about 20 states including Indiana and Tennessee — the only two states that report meth labs at numbers anywhere near Missouri’s.

Both states require a meth lab property with high levels of chemicals to be quarantined, cleaned and tested before it can be lived in.

 

 

 

 

http://www.news-leader.com/article/20130914/NEWS12/309140014/meth-lab-rental-house-Willard-Gourley?odyssey=nav%7Chead

 

 

Tulare County’s gang enforcement team made a big bust Thursday afternoon, arresting a Visalia man in connection with drugs.

The TARGET team stormed a home in the 4600 block of West Feemster Street in Visalia Thursday after a one month investigation into drugs and gangs.

Methamphetamine

Methamphetamine

 

 

Police found a pound of crystal methamphetamine, $14,133 in cash, scales and packaging materials.

 

Officers also located the man they say was responsible for the drugs, 40-year-old Martin Corrales. Corrales was on active parole and is a northern gang member, according to Visalia police.

 

Corrales was booked on drug charges and a parole violation.

 

 

 

http://www.visaliatimesdelta.com/article/20130913/NEWS01/130913003?nclick_check=1

 

 

A DRUG-addicted woman stole money from her elderly grandmother to feed a methamphetamine habit.

Amanda Mavis Gannon regularly visited her grandmother and would often sleep at her home overnight.

 Amanda Mavis Gannon leaves the Mackay Court House.

Amanda Mavis Gannon leaves the Mackay Court House

 

 

The 81-year-old had two debit bank cards in her home and kept the PIN numbers written down nearby, which Gannon removed, the Mackay Magistrates Court heard yesterday.

Between July 6 and 9 this year, Gannon stole $5446.50 by withdrawing cash from a number of ATMs in Mackay, prosecutor Elizabeth Cassells said.

Gannon’s mother discovered the offence and told police. The 29-year-old mother of four attended the police station on July 22. She refused to participate in a formal record of interview and said she just wanted to be charged so she could plead guilty, Ms Cassells said.

The court heard Gannon paid full restitution to her grandmother after she borrowed the money from her mother. Gannon has previously been in custody on drug-related matters and has suffered from a methylamphetamine addiction from a young age.

Defence solicitor Antoinette Morton, of Morton Lawyers, said Gannon had attempted to break her habit on many occasions but found it easy to fall back into her old life. The money she stole from her grandmother was used to buy methylamphetamine. She had since moved out of town to remove herself from her old associates.

She pleaded guilty to stealing and attempted stealing charges.

Ms Cassells said imprisonment with actual time served was within range. However, Magistrate Ross Risson said she “should be given the benefit of continuing the progress” she had made.

He jailed her for 12 months wholly suspended for two years and placed her on two years probation.

 

 

 

http://www.dailymercury.com.au/news/meth-addict-ripped-off-grandmother-mackay-court/2020438/

 

 

Federal authorities have identified the two men accused this week of attempting to smuggle about $1 million worth of crystal methamphetamine through an international crossing.

Juan Eduardo Villaverde-Hernandez, 52, and Miguel Angel Martinez-Lopez, 41, were charged with conspiring to possess and possession with intent to distribute meth, according to the criminal complaint.

On Monday, a 1999 Ford F-150 driven by Martinez-Lopez of Matamoros, Mexico, and his passenger Villaverde-Hernandez of Naucalpan, Mexico, arrived at the inspection booth of International Bridge I. In primary inspection, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer noticed tampering of the vehicle’s drive shaft.

In secondary inspection, CBP officers discovered a “white crystallized substance” concealed within the vehicle, the complaint states. The substance tested positive for meth and weighed a total of 31 pounds.

Homeland Security Investigations special agents responded to the scene to investigate.

“Villaverde-Hernandez admitted to agents that he had knowledge of the narcotics concealed within the Ford F-150,” the complaint states.

“Villaverde-Hernandez stated he was going to be paid $20,000 to smuggle the narcotics into the United States.” Both men are in federal custody.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.lmtonline.com/articles/2013/09/13/front/news/doc5233376c798ef864505241.txt

PUTNAM COUNTY — A resident who noticed some unusual activity across the street  from his home led deputies to a meth “dumpsite.”

On Wednesday, a resident  on Clarkrange Highway called deputies to report that something unusual had been  going on across the street, according to a report by Deputy John  Pettit.

“Deputies responded and located a ‘dumpsite’ where numerous meth  related items had been disposed of as well as an active one-pot lab,” the report  states.

Dispatchers placed an extra watch on the area, but there were no  arrests made in the case as of Friday morning.

Police have seen more and  more roadside meth dumpsites and those making the dangerous drug have moved to  smaller cooking operations that are portable.

Anyone noticing suspicious  activity or identifying items they believe could be part of a meth lab should  contact police.

 

 

 

http://www.herald-citizen.com/view/full_story/23602854/article-Meth-dumpsite-found-on-side-of-road?instance=latest_articles