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The Otero County Sheriff’s Office seized 13 pounds of high grade methamphetamine along with weapons, cash and other drugs after serving a search warrant at an Otero County residence Tuesday, Sheriff Benny House said.

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House said the bust was significant because of the huge quantity of drugs seized.

The methamphetamine is believed to have a street value of about $588,000 if it were sold by grams worth about $100 a piece.

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Evidence laid out at the Sheriff’s Office Wednesday took up two six-foot long tables and several kinds of drugs were stored in a pill container marked with different times of day and days of the week.

According to Otero County Magistrate Court records, Neil Ochoa, 54, is charged with one count each of second-degree felony trafficking a controlled substance, one count of fourth-degree felony possession of heroin, one count of misdemeanor possession of drug paraphernalia and one count of civil forfeiture of property.

Ochoa was jailed at the Otero County Detention Center in lieu of a $200,000 bond pending his appearance in court.

According to court records obtained by the Daily News, Ochoa has been arrested on other unrelated drug offenses at least one other time in the last two weeks.

Also charged were Chire Allison, 27, and Wesley Gonzales, 34.

According to court records, Allison and Gonzales are charged with one count each of second-degree felony trafficking of methamphetamine, one count each of misdemeanor possession of drug paraphernalia and one count each of civil forfeiture of property.

Allison and Gonzales were jailed at OCDC on $21,000 bonds each pending their appearance in court. Gonzales also had three warrants pending at the time of his arrest Tuesday.

House said the detective division of the OSCO served the warrant on a residence in the 200 block of Mountain Meadows in Otero County on Tuesday.

Detectives had investigated for nine months before serving the warrant on Tuesday along with the Otero County Narcotics Enforcement Unit. U.S. Border Patrol and Alamogordo Police Department were also present.

He said law enforcement found Allison and Gonzales at the residence at the time of the warrant execution and took them into custody.

“Through the course of the search, 13.4 pounds of methamphetamine were located,” House said. “The methamphetamine was located in several areas of the residence with the bulk of the meth being concealed in plastic buckets concealed by dirt and rocks.”

He said deputies also found China white heroin, which is uncommon in Otero County, along with cocaine, suspected MDMA (ecstacy) and numerous unidentified prescription pills. Several firearms were also seized along with cash.

House said deputies caught up with Ochoa at a residence in the 3200 block of Fayne Lane in Alamogordo, where they served two more warrants and found more cash. All in, the OSCO seized $9,360 from the three individuals.

“An arrest warrant was obtained for Neil Ochoa based on the evidence found at the Mountain Meadows residence and he was incarcerated,” House said.

House said Tuesday’s bust is a significant case for the citizens of Otero County based on the quality of the methamphetamine and the “extremely large amount”

“This should make a tremendous impact on the supply of methamphetamine in Otero County and surrounding areas,” House said.

House said the Sheriff’s Office is working hard at combating criminal activity in the area, including drug trafficking, which leads to other types of crime.

“Drug crimes are often catalysts for other crimes such as property crimes, violent crimes, domestic crimes and often results in child abuse and child neglect,” he said.

The case has been turned over to the 12th Judicial District Attorney’s Office, but House said the investigation is ongoing and federal charges might be levied against the defendants.

“Often times federal sentencing guidelines are stiffer and more appropriate for these types of offenders, these high level offenders,” House said, adding that follow up investigations are continuing.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.alamogordonews.com/alamogordo-news/ci_25719199/sheriffs-office-seizes-13-4-pounds-methamphetamine

 

 

NORFOLK – A kitchen fire on Monday night ended with one man being charged after firefighters and law enforcement officers removed materials they believed were used to make methamphetamine.

The fire was reported about 8:30 p.m. in the 3200 block of Vimy Ridge Ave., according to a police news release. No injuries were reported.

Firefighters extinguished the blaze quickly, and while searching for the cause, they found what they believed to be ingredients used in making meth, Norfolk Fire-Rescue Battalion Chief Julian Williamson said.

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Police charged Anton Arnez Godley, 41, with felony possession of two or more substances with intent to manufacture methamphetamine, and misdemeanor possession of marijuana, the release said.

 

 

 

 

 

http://hamptonroads.com/2014/05/kitchen-fire-norfolk-leads-drug-charges

 

The state is seeking emergency protective custody of a baby girl born to a Lincoln woman who went to the hospital with track marks on both arms.

The woman tested positive for methamphetamine April 28, the day she gave birth to her daughter, according to a Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services worker.

Nurses said they noticed needle marks on her arms when she arrived at the hospital, prompting the urine test and a call to the Child Abuse Neglect Hotline.

The baby is at the neonatal intensive care unit at Saint Elizabeth Regional Medical Center, where she is being monitored for signs of methamphetamine withdrawal.

Lincoln Police Officer Katie Flood said there’s no criminal investigation of the mother.

 

 

 

 

 

http://journalstar.com/news/local/911/hhs-worker-mother-used-meth-before-delivering-baby/article_b3996901-d25e-56f3-8825-32345e5e849b.html

 

NACOGDOCHES, TX (KTRE) – Ongoing investigations into the distribution of methamphetamine by Nacogdoches County Sheriff’s Office narcotics deputies over the course of the past week resulted in seven arrests.

According to a press release, NCSO deputies got consent to search a residence on County Road 137 on April 30. During the search, the deputies allegedly located 39 grams of crystal meth inside a safe.

Evidence from a series of meth arrests

James Wright, 58, and Samantha Simpson, 42, both of Garrison, were arrested at the scene. Both of the suspects were arrested for possession of a controlled substance between 4 and 200 grams, which is a third-degree felony. Simpson was also charged with motion to revoke probation, a third-degree felony. No bond amounts were available for either suspect.

Two of the arrests occurred after deputies conducted a traffic stop on CR 136 on May 1. During the traffic stop, the deputies observed the suspects in the vehicle throw something out the window. The press release stated the deputies retrieved 5 grams of meth that was thrown from the vehicle.

The CR 136 traffic stop resulted in the arrests of Patrick Jernigan, 25, and Katie Barrett, 19, both of Nacogdoches. Jernigan was charged with possession of a controlled substance between 4 and 200 grams, tampering with physical evidence, four counts of bail jumping/failure to appear, and four warrants from another magistrate. Barrett was charged with possession of a controlled substance between 4 and 200 grams and tampering with physical evidence.

Collectively Jernigan’s bail was set at $42,500, and Barrett’s bail was set at $40,000.

On May 2, NCSO deputies conducted a consensual search of a home in the Sleepy Hollow subdivision in the Etoile area. The deputies found Kristopher Lalonde, 40, of Etoile in possession of 1 gram of crystal meth, the press release stated.

Deputies arrested John Paul Hicks, 31, of Alto, on May 2. During the investigation, Hicks allegedly met with undercover detectives in Douglass and attempted to buy meth. Hicks was charged with possession of a controlled substance between 4 and 200 grams, and his bail was set at $25,000.

Ricky Eugene Sowell Jr., 30, of Nacogdoches, was arrested on May 1 after NCSO deputies acted on a tip and searched a residence on Weldon Drive. He was charged with possession of a controlled substance less than 1 gram and manufacture/delivery of a controlled substance between 4 and 200 grams. Collectively, his bail was set at $75,000.

“Investigators found evidence at the residence that directly linked [Sowell] to methamphetamine and methamphetamine sales,” the press release stated. “Deputies had recovered a large amount of methamphetamine at another residence where deputies found additional evidence that linked both suspects together.”

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.ktre.com/story/25445935/nacogdoches-sheriffs-office

 

BELLA VISTA, Ark.Detectives from the Benton County Sheriff’s Office arrested three people in a methamphetamine bust at a home in Bella Vista.

Officials said they executed a search warrant at a home at 1 Truro Lane.

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With the assistance of Benton County Special Weapons and Tactics Team, Allen Utsler, Dylan Utsler and Kelly McCabe were arrested.

Officials found a large-scale methamphetamine lab, referring to it as a “super lab.” Detectives located approximately 175 to 200 “one pot” methamphetamine lab bottles and other items associated with methamphetamine manufacturing.

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It took lab-certified officers approximately 12 hours to dismantle and neutralize the lab. More than 200 pounds of neutralizing chemicals were used to render the lab safe.

Benton County officers said uncovering a meth lab so large is unusual, but said it is in line with a recent surge in meth cases locally.

In 2013, the department made 20 arrests related to methamphetamine labs. So far this year, 165 people have been arrested on the same type of charges. That’s an 8-fold increase in just the first 4 months!

Investigators said a new drug task force is keeping the streets clean, but they’re still unsure why the increase is so drastic.

“We’re talking pounds of meth, not grams or ounces. We’re talking pounds,” said Deputy Keisha Guyll.

Allen Wade Utsler, 40, is being held in Benton County Jail on a $100,000 bond. Utsler was charged with manufacturing a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of drugs, possession of firearms, and intent to deliver.

Dylan Wade Utsler, 20, is being held in the Benton County Jail on a $50,000 bond. Charges against him include possession with intent to deliver, possession of drug paraphernalia, manufacturing a controlled substance and possession of a firearm by certain persons.

Kelly Jean McCabe, 37, posted a $25,000 bond and was released. Charges filed against her include possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of a controlled substance.

All three are scheduled to be arraigned on June 9 at 8 a.m.

 

 

 

 

http://www.4029tv.com/news/3-arrested-in-bella-vista-meth-bust/25832442

 

Two men are in jail after they tried unsuccessfully to get rid of some methamphetamine.

Bartlesville police stopped a vehicle driven by Derek Boff on a traffic violation. The officer arrested Boff’s passenger, Timothy Povlick on a felony warrant.

Once he was in the police car the officer noticed Povlick had balls of meth in his mouth.

Police went back to the Boff car, searched it, and arrested him on a drug charge.

Povlick told police he had eaten some of the meth and had to go to the hospital for treatment.

The pair is charged with possession of methamphetamine and destruction of evidence.

The court will be able so see video of Povlick and Bock in the back of the squad car, trying to keep the bags of drugs concealed in their mouths. The incident was recorded by dash-cam cameras just installed in Bartlesville’s police patrol cars. -

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://bartlesvilleradio.com/pages/news/70732014/pair-eats-drugs-to-conceal-methcaught-on-police-video

 

The remnants of two clandestine methamphetamine laboratories have been discovered and seized by patrol deputies and narcotics detectives, according to information from the Watauga County Sheriff’s Office. The time and date of the discoveries was not immediately released.

Both methamphetamine labs were characteristic of the red phosphorous method of manufacture, according to the sheriff’s office, which said this method is not as prevalent today due to easier and faster methods of production, such as the “shake and bake” method, commonly referred to as the one-pot method.

One methamphetamine lab was located behind the property of 122 South Road, Todd, and the lab components were found by children who were playing in the area.

The sheriff’s office was contacted and made aware of the suspected methamphetamine lab.

Shift supervisor Lt. Phillips, who is clandestine lab certified, arrived on scene and confirmed that the components were characteristic of a methamphetamine lab.

Narcotics detectives were notified of the situation. Once on the scene, detectives seized multiple items used in the manufacturing process. The methamphetamine precursors appeared to be nonhazardous and were disposed of by detectives.

An additional red phosphorous methamphetamine lab was located and seized near the Stoney Fork Overlook which is located on the Blue Ridge Parkway.

Park rangers from the U.S. Department of Interior located items consistent with the manufacture of methamphetamine, and contacted the sheriff’s office.

Narcotics detectives seized multiple methamphetamine precursors consistent with the red phosphorous method of manufacture.

The methamphetamine precursors appeared to be nonhazardous and were disposed of by detectives.

Both investigations are ongoing.

http://www2.wataugademocrat.com/News/story/Sheriff-Children-discover-meth-lab-remains-id-014929

Porterville police raided a drug house in the midst of a methamphetamine cook and arrested six people for drug-related charges Tuesday (May 4).

Police searched two homes in Terra Bella and Porterville early Tuesday morning and found methamphetamine, marijuana and narcotics. At the Terra Bella home, detectives also found a laboratory manufacturing methamphetamine — interrupting a cook midway and preventing the production of one pound of the drug, police said.

Arrested were Jimmy Auld, 32, Vanessa Auld, 34, and Herman Auld, 58, all of Terra Bella, and George Carrillo, 20, Crystal Aguirre, 29 and Ronald Sanchez Sr., 45, all of Porterville.

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http://www.fresnobee.com/2014/05/06/3913526/drug-house-raided-in-terra-bella.html?sp=/99/406/263/

 

Researchers have for the first time found a direct link between use of the drug ice and violence.

While violent behaviour among ice users has been well known, it has not been clear until now whether the drug, also known as methamphetamine, actually caused violent behaviour, or whether factors such as genetic characteristics and behavioural problems in childhood led to both drug use and violence.

Researchers got around the problem by tracking 278 chronic ice users in Sydney and Brisbane.

“We compared the same person when they’re using the drug, compared to when they’re not using the drug,” said one of the researchers, Rebecca McKetin of the Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing at the Australian National University.

The study, published in the journal Addiction, found only 10 per cent of the users were violent when they were not taking the drug, but 60 per cent were violent when they used the drug heavily.

“We found that the drug dramatically increases the risk of violence,” Dr McKetin said. “It is clear that this risk is in addition to any pre-existing tendency that the person has toward violence.”

Dr McKetin said heavy ice use altered the chemicals in the brain that are responsible for controlling emotions such as aggression.

“When you add this drug, it’s like adding fuel to the fire,” Dr McKetin said.

She said the findings underlined the need for more resources to treat ice users.

“We can clearly see that when they stop using the drug they’re a much happier bunch of people.”

The study follows a recent Australian Crime Commission report that warned of a “pandemic” of ice use in Australia.

The report said the total amount of amphetamines seized at Australia’s borders increased more than 500 per cent in the past year.

In Victoria, the Napthine government recently committed $34 million to boost drug support services to help tackle growing ice use in the state.

 

 

 

 

http://www.smh.com.au/national/health/study-links-ice-to-violence-20140506-zr5iz.html

 

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Four men have been indicted on charges alleging they kidnapped and tortured two men they suspected of stealing drugs and money from a St. Paul “stash house,” federal prosecutors announced Tuesday.

The kidnappers released their victims, but not before nearly severing one victim’s finger while interrogating him in the house, court papers allege.

State prosecutors say the house was controlled by a Mexican drug cartel, though court documents don’t say which one and federal prosecutors declined to comment.

All four were indicted on one count of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine. One was also indicted on one count of using a gun during a drug crime.

“The allegations in the indictment are a frightening reminder of the violent capabilities of drug traffickers,” U.S. Attorney Andy Luger said in a statement.

The indictment unsealed Tuesday and other court papers say the four men suspected the victims stole or knew who stole about 30 pounds of methamphetamine and $200,000 from the stash house last month. It names Jesus Ramirez, 31, of Los Angeles; Jonatan Delgado Alvarez, 22, of Los Angeles; Juan Ricardo Elenes Villavazo, also known as Chapo, 32, of St. Paul; and Antonio Navarro, also known as Tony Sanchez, 19, of St. Paul.

The defendants released the victims after determining they didn’t know what happened to the drugs, the documents say.

Navarro and Alvarez were arrested outside the house April 15. Ramirez was arrested after a police chase in the Los Angeles area April 17. Villavazo remains at large, the U.S. attorney’s office said.

The indictment alleges Navarro and Villavazo ran the stash house, and that Ramirez and Alvarez flew from Los Angeles on April 14 to try to recover the stolen meth or enough cash to cover it. It alleges they kidnapped two men from behind a Minneapolis residence and beat them, held a gun to their heads, and threatened to kill them and their families.

Court papers allege Villavazo tried to cut off one victim’s left pinky with scissors, causing him to pass out, while the others held him down. The documents say the victim later underwent surgery but that it was unclear if he would regain the ability to move his finger.

State kidnapping and other charges filed last month against Navarro, Ramirez and Delgado are on hold pending the outcome of the federal case, said Dennis Gerhardstein, spokesman for the Ramsey County attorney’s office.

Attorney Anthony Deutz represented Ramirez on the state charges. He declined to comment specifically on the federal charges but added “I think he got caught up in this and that he was not involved.” It wasn’t immediately clear if Delgado or Navarro had lawyers.

All four defendants face a potential maximum of life in prison if convicted on the drug count, while Ramirez also faces a potential a minimum of seven years for allegedly using a gun to kidnap and threaten the victims, according to the U.S. attorney’s office.

 

 

 

 

http://www.chron.com/news/crime/article/Mexican-drug-cartel-accuses-of-torture-in-St-Paul-5456604.php

 

 

4 Indicted In Minnesota Drug Cartel Torture Case

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Four men have been indicted on charges alleging they kidnapped and tortured two men they suspected of stealing drugs and money from a St. Paul “stash house,” federal prosecutors announced Tuesday.

The kidnappers released their victims, but not before nearly severing one victim’s finger while interrogating him in the house, court papers allege.

State prosecutors say the house was controlled by a Mexican drug cartel, though court documents don’t say which one and federal prosecutors declined to comment.

All four were indicted on one count of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine. One was also indicted on one count of using a gun during a drug crime.

“The allegations in the indictment are a frightening reminder of the violent capabilities of drug traffickers,” U.S. Attorney Andy Luger said in a statement.

The indictment unsealed Tuesday and other court papers say the four men suspected the victims stole or knew who stole about 30 pounds of methamphetamine and $200,000 from the stash house last month. It names Jesus Ramirez, 31, of Los Angeles; Jonatan Delgado Alvarez, 22, of Los Angeles; Juan Ricardo Elenes Villavazo, also known as Chapo, 32, of St. Paul; and Antonio Navarro, also known as Tony Sanchez, 19, of St. Paul.

The defendants released the victims after determining they didn’t know what happened to the drugs, the documents say.

Navarro and Alvarez were arrested outside the house April 15. Ramirez was arrested after a police chase in the Los Angeles area April 17. Villavazo remains at large, the U.S. attorney’s office said.

The indictment alleges Navarro and Villavazo ran the stash house, and that Ramirez and Alvarez flew from Los Angeles on April 14 to try to recover the stolen meth or enough cash to cover it. It alleges they kidnapped two men from behind a Minneapolis residence and beat them, held a gun to their heads, and threatened to kill them and their families.

Court papers allege Villavazo tried to cut off one victim’s left pinky with scissors, causing him to pass out, while the others held him down. The documents say the victim later underwent surgery but that it was unclear if he would regain the ability to move his finger.

State kidnapping and other charges filed last month against Navarro, Ramirez and Delgado are on hold pending the outcome of the federal case, said Dennis Gerhardstein, spokesman for the Ramsey County attorney’s office.

Attorney Anthony Deutz represented Ramirez on the state charges. He declined to comment specifically on the federal charges but added “I think he got caught up in this and that he was not involved.” It wasn’t immediately clear if Delgado or Navarro had lawyers.

All four defendants face a potential maximum of life in prison if convicted on the drug count, while Ramirez also faces a potential a minimum of seven years for allegedly using a gun to kidnap and threaten the victims, according to the U.S. attorney’s office.

 

 

 

 

http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2014/05/06/4-indicted-in-minnesota-drug-cartel-torture-case/

 

 

 

4 indicted in Mexican drug cartel torture case at St. Paul stash house

ST. PAUL, Minn. (KMSP) – Federal charges were announced Tuesday against 4 men tied to a Mexican drug cartel, accused of kidnapping and torturing people they suspected of stealing meth and money from a St. Paul stash house.

The indictment charged the following men:

- Jesus Ramirez, 31, of Los Angeles

- Jonatan Delgado Alvarez, 22, of Los Angeles

- Juan Ricardo Elenes Villalvazo, a.k.a. Chapo, 32, of St. Paul

- Antonio Navarro a.k.a. Tony Sanchez, 19, of St. Paul

STASH HOUSE THEFT

According to the charges, Ramirez and Alvarez flew from Los Angeles to the Minnesota on April 14 to deal with a report that 30 lbs of methamphetamine had been stolen from the stash house just two days earlier.

THE TORTURE

Later that night, the 4 defendants kidnapped two victims at gunpoint and held them captive at the stash house, torturing them and threatening their lives and the lives of their family members.

According to the indictment, Villalvazo cut one of the victim’s fingers, nearly severing it, while Ramirez held the victim down. After determining the victims had no information about the missing drugs, the defendants released them.

THE ARRESTS

Navarro was arrested on the evening of April 15, as he was leaving the stash house that was surrounded by officers. Alvarez attempted to leave the stash house and was also arrested.

In the early morning hours of April 16, Ramirez flew back to Los Angeles from Minneapolis. He was arrested the following day at a hotel in a Los Angeles suburb after leading police officers on a high speed car chase.

All 4 defendants are charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine. Ramirez is also charged with carrying a gun that was used to kidnap and threaten the victims.

If convicted, all 4 defendants could face life in prison for the drug conspiracy charge. Ramirez faces a minimum penalty of 7 years in prison for the gun charge.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.myfoxtwincities.com/story/25442323/mexican-drug-cartel-torture-minnesota

 

A Nelson woman is among those charged over an alleged large-scale methamphetamine ring, after a police bust that included the seizure of two Richmond properties.

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Lisa Marie Ryan, 51, a self-employed midwife, appeared in the Auckland District Court yesterday charged with participating in an organised criminal group, five counts of money laundering, and unlawful possession of a pistol.

She was among eight people arrested on Monday after a nine-month investigation, code-named Operation Genoa, into the manufacture and supply of methamphetamine in the Auckland region.

It is understood that Ryan was arrested in Auckland.

Police raided five properties in Auckland, rural Waikato and Richmond, seizing an estimated $3.5 million worth of drugs and about $3m in assets.

They included two properties in Richmond and a Dodge Nitro four-wheel-drive, police said.

The others charged are alleged senior patched Head Hunters gang members Michael Joseph Cavanagh, 40, and David Gerrard O’Carroll, 49, two other men and three women.

Police said they recovered about half a kilogram of methamphetamine and 6kg of precursor drugs and chemicals, with a combined street value of more than $3.5m.

Among the assets seized were Ferrari, Porsche and Maserati cars, a 10-metre launch, the five properties, gold bullion, silver ingots, firearms, and more than $2m in cash.

Detective Inspector Bruce Good, of the Organised and Financial Crime Agency, said one of the suspects escaped during a raid on a rural property in eastern Waikato, but was found in a ditch less than two hours later with the help of police dogs. He suffered dog bite injuries during his capture.

Police believe the group used several addresses and storage units to produce, store and distribute methamphetamine and the Class B drug ephedrine.

Intelligence indicated that the group was producing more than $1m worth of methamphetamine at a time, which gave an indication as to the size of the market it was supplying, Good said.

“The size and scale of the manufacturing is very concerning.”

He said Operation Genoa showed the size and scale of organised crime, the size of the market for drugs and the involvement of gangs.

The seized money will be put into the public account until the courts decide what to do with it and the other assets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.stuff.co.nz/nelson-mail/news/10018503/Nelson-woman-in-court-after-drug-ring-arrests

 

 

 

 

“You got me. Take me away,” one of the accused in a major methamphetamine trial told a police officer when pulled over, prosecutors say.

Six men and three women accused of being involved in a drug ring have appeared in the High Court at Auckland today.

The defendants – from Northland and Auckland – have pleaded not guilty to the charges.

In her opening statement, Crown prosecutor Rebecca Thomson said police pulled over Frank William Murray as he drove to his home in the Far North in October 2012.

The police officer requested to search Murray’s car and trailer.

Murray responded: “Yeah, f***k, you got me. Take me away“, Thomson told the court.

Police found a methamphetamine lab packed into boxes on the car’s trailer, she said.

The incident came at the end of a police surveillance operation involving people in the Far North, Northland, Auckland and Napier.

Police intercepted Murray’s phone calls as part of the operation.

The defendants used code words to describe the criminal activity, with “work” meaning methamphetamine, Thomson said.

To say you were “going on holiday because you were out of work” translated to not having any meth, she said.

After Murray was pulled over, police raided properties across the upper North Island and seized drugs, money and equipment for making methamphetamine.

This included finding an old army tin containing a revolver and $100,000 hidden on a Far North property.

The Crown says the evidence pointed to the manufacture of the class A drug.

“They sourced the ingredients to manufacture methamphetamine, they allowed their property to be used for the manufacture of methamphetamine,” she said.

However, the defence team say the Crown’s evidence is speculative and falls short of proving guilt beyond reasonable doubt.

The defendants are: Murray, Curtis Edward Yates, Betty Anne Lloyd, Grant James Dobbyn, Anthony Charles Dobbyn. Dionne Jean Rundberg, Liang Gui Ye, Phillip Bancroft and Yan Wei Du

Charges include the supply and manufacture of methamphetamine, supplying pseudoephedrine, allowing a premises to be used for the manufacture of methamphetamine and conspiring to supply drugs.

Murray’s brother Colin Murray was also due to stand trial, but died last year.

The trial is expected to last six weeks.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/crime/10019027/You-got-me-drug-accused-tells-cop

 

SAN CLEMENTE – A mother driving with her two children was arrested Monday morning after Border Patrol agents discovered more than six pounds of methamphetamine in her vehicle, authorities said.

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The drugs were discovered after agents “became suspicious” of a 33-year-old woman driving a 2001 Honda Accord at the checkpoint on the northbound 5 near San Clemente, according to a Border Patrol statement.

Agents pulled the vehicle over at Basilone Road, and brought out a police dog to help search the car.

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Packages of methamphetamine were found hidden inside the lining of an ice chest, near a child’s booster seat, authorities said. The agents found 6.72 pounds of methamphetamine, which they estimate has a street value of about $67,200.

The woman, who authorities identified only as a U.S. citizen, was turned over to the Drug Enforcement Administration. The two children were taken by child welfare services workers from San Diego.

Authorities say it was the second methamphetamine bust at the same checkpoint in recent days.

Sunday morning, a 47-year-old Mexican driving a 1999 Mercedes-Benz CLK430 was stopped 2 miles from the checkpoint and searched. With the assistance of a police dog, agents found 12.79 pounds of methamphetamine hidden inside the vehicle’s intake manifold. Authorities estimate the drugs to be worth about $127,900 on the street.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.ocregister.com/articles/authorities-613118-methamphetamine-agents.html

 

A 23-year-old Helena woman was arrested Sunday after she was found to be in possession of methamphetamine and marijuana.

Heather Denise Quinn allowed officers to enter her residence Sunday as part of a different investigation they were conducting, an affidavit supporting her arrest said.

Upon entering, Quinn “was instantly upset in what I would describe as a panic,” the affidavit said. “While explaining the investigation to Heather, she stated she was going to be in trouble.”

When asked why, Quinn produced a pipe with burnt marijuana residue, a pipe with burnt methamphetamine residue, a Camel Snus Mellow tin containing marijuana and a small plastic bag containing methamphetamine, the affidavit said.

She was arrested for felony possession of methamphetamine, misdemeanor possession of marijuana and misdemeanor possession of drug paraphernalia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://helenair.com/news/local/woman-arrested-for-meth-marijuana-possession/article_0464097c-d4da-11e3-b90c-001a4bcf887a.html

 

Police in the Coffs-Clarence Local Area Command (LAC) say methylamphetamine, more commonly known as “ice”, is still very present in the region.

Over $2.5 million worth of ice was seized by police in the Coffs-Clarence region in just the first three months of this year, and 44 people have been arrested on meth-related charges.

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Coffs Harbour has in the past been labelled the ‘meth lab’ capital of the state.

Our arrest statistics in relation to the possession and supply of methamphetamine are still quite significant

Darren Jameson, Coffs-Clarence LAC Crime Manager

 

Coffs-Clarence Crime Manager, Detective Inspector Darren Jameson, said it has been a focus of their policing efforts in the region throughout the year.

“Our arrest statistics in relation to the possession and supply of methylamphetamine are still quite significant,” he said.

“It indicates that in the community there is a culture of use of methylamphetamine.

“That is of great concern not only to us as police, but I would daresay to the community with people that are affected running around among us.”

Detective Inspector Jameson said ice is at the root of much of the crime committed within the region.

He said its a fluctuating problem, along with a range of other substances.

“There is a supply and demand aspect,” he said.

“Meth does come into prominence when there is a drop in heroin, and vice-versa.

“There is a very strong influence of methylamphetamine here, it is a very insidious drug that has very significant long-term effects on people, and we do see that presence here.”

 

 

 

 

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-05-07/meth-a-significant-problem-in-coffs-clarence-lac/5435594?&section=news

 

 DESOTO PARISH, La. (KTBS) – A DeSoto Parish mother was arrested during a traffic stop after drugs were found in her baby’s diaper.

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It happened Monday evening during a traffic stop. The Sheriff’s Office was checking on a tip they received about drug activity going on at a home.

Officers pulled over 53 year-old Linda Walker near the home after seeing 26 year-old Cecelia Carter get into the vehicle with her infant who was not in a child safety seat. Instead, Carter allegedly placed the child in her lap.

During the traffic stop, a relative near the scene offered to change the infant’s diaper. That’s when they found a baggie of crystal meth stuck to the child bottom. The child was transported to the hospital by ambulance for evaluation. The child was later released to family members.

Carter was arrested and booked into the DeSoto Parish Detention Center where she is being charged with Possession of Schedule II Drugs, Illegal use of CDS in the presence of a person under 17 years-old, possession of drug paraphernalia and no seat belt.

The driver, Linda Walker, was also arrested and charged with driving under suspension.

 

 

 

 

http://www.ktbs.com/story/25441478/desoto-parish-mother-arrested-after-drugs-were-found-babys-diaper

 

Police in Dublin, CA responded to a domestic disturbance call in the 7000 block of Dublin Meadows Street on Sunday, May 4th, about 6:17 P.M. Upon arrival at the residence, officers were met at the front door by a male subject holding a baseball bat. A Dublin Police Officer drew his firearm and Oscar Herrera immediately hit the Dublin Police Officer with the metal baseball bat.

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The bat hit the Officer on his right hand which was holding his firearm. Herrera then raised the baseball bat over his head in a motion which would direct the bat at the Officer’s head. The Officer felt his life was in immediate danger and fired four rounds striking the suspect and stopping the threat to his life. Alameda County Fire and Paramedics Plus responded to the scene; however, the suspect succumbed to his injuries. Herrara was a graduate of Foothill High School in Pleasanton.

In the investigation and interviews conducted through the night, Dublin Police was able to learn what had happened prior to the Dublin Police’s arrival. A family member called a friend, and that friend called Dublin Police Services. Said friend reported that Oscar Herrera was being physical with his mother and had pushed her, as she tried to convince him to enter rehab. The friend was not at the apartment when Dublin Police arrived.

In addition, Dublin Police learned that on Saturday, the Livermore Police Department was called to an incident during which Herrera was using methamphetamine and had attacked a friend. Herrera allegedly threatened to eat his friend during the altercation. Livermore Police arrived and contacted Herrera, who was covered in blood and immediately began fighting with the Livermore Police. Officers had to use their Taser to gain control of Herrera, who was then transported to a local hospital for treatment. On Sunday morning, May 4th, Herrera called his mother and asked her to pick him up at the hospital, because he had decided to leave against the medical advice of the doctor who was treating him.

Herrera had a criminal history for possession of weapons, assaults, resisting arrest, and possession of drugs. Interviews with witnesses at the scene were consistent with the suspect attacking the officer with a baseball bat at the threshold into the residence.

 

 

 

 

http://www.arounddublinblog.com/2014/05/dublin-ca-police-guns-down-oscar-herrera-bat-wielding-meth-addict/

 

Drugs criminality is almost overwhelming the police and the Department of Justice in the Netherlands, yet some ex-dealers are saying that most of the criminals they are pursuing are only amateurs. One convicted xtc-producer is even surprised that there aren’t more deaths.

National public prosecutor Neeltje Geldermans believes that the authorities may not be able to curb the growth and production of drugs in this country, it’s like emptying the ocean with a thimble.

The Algemeen Dagblad newspaper spoke with a convicted drugs criminal who was arrested for his role in organizing the production of synthetic drugs, and selling the product worldwide. ‘Paul’ got a sentence of four to five years and speaks about the dangers in a drugs lab.

In 2013, 44 drug labs were dismantled in the Netherlands. This is a steep climb compared to 29 in 2012 and 24 the year before. This might just be the tip of the iceberg. Drug waste dumping actions amounted to 26 in January alone. In 2013 there were 150.

On monday the 28th of April, two bodies were discovered in a business premises in Uden. The men were wearing masks, and police discovered chemicals for the production of synthetic drugs. Police are still investigating the cause of death.

Paul believes that these were amateurs who made some mistakes. “They may have mixed the wrong chemicals to make PMK or BMK. It could be that they were cheated. That they were wrong in the assumption that it was substance A while it was substance C. That led to a chemical reaction. It is also possible that the masks weren’t good.”

Paul and a co-suspect ‘Willem’ say that it’s a wonder there aren’t more deaths in the industry. “You’re either a specialist with a background as chemist, or you’re an amateur who has learnt the art. You can be sure that 98 percent of the producers are useless. I, and another three or four belong to the 2 percent who can really do it”, says sexagenarian Willem.

The dangers in a lab could be missed by amateurs. “There is danger of explosion because you need hydrogen in the production of MDMA for example. That is very flammable and explosive. With a leak in your chemical alignment it can go very wrong.”

Willem says that amateurs aren’t able to see warning signs before something goes wrong either. A thorough knowledge of the behavior of chemicals and production process is crucial to avoid rookie mistakes.

The process of making drugs should also never be done in one place, Paul explains. Putting all your eggs in one basket is dangerous. Labs are often discovered by area residents who see white smoke rising. This smoke is actually vapor sometimes caused by the combination of hydrochloric acid and APAAN in the production of amphetamines. Producers think something’s wrong and run away, then the residents think it’s fire and call the emergency services.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.nltimes.nl/2014/05/06/meth-makers-incompetent-ex-dealer/

 

LAKE CITY, Tennessee (CNN) — Two strangers came in with big promises and plans to save a dying town.

A multimillion-dollar water park. A 3-D interactive theater. A pirate-themed restaurant. A country music theater to draw singers. And that’s not all: an athletic complex to host children’s leagues and a sports museum honoring University of Tennessee athletics. A fancy hotel. And an amusement park.

 

Think Dollywood.

Branson, Missouri.

Disney World.

All of it can be yours, on one condition: Change your town’s name.

To Rocky Top!

Tennessee town's rocky road to becoming Rocky Top

That coveted name in eastern Tennessee. The name of the famed bluegrass song that rises from Neyland Stadium in Knoxville on Saturday afternoons, when 100,000 Tennessee football fans join with the university band and sing out in jubilation, their raucous cheers winding down the Tennessee River and cascading over the Smoky Mountains.

Rocky top, you’ll always be Home sweet home to me. Good ole Rocky top, Rocky top Tennessee, Rocky top Tennessee.

This town of 1,800 nestled in the Appalachians mountains about 30 miles northwest of Knoxville changed its name once before, in 1936. The city leaders thought a name change would help draw tourists when the Tennessee Valley Authority put in a dam and a manmade lake several miles away. The proud mining town switched from Coal Creek to Lake City.

There is no lake in Lake City. If the tourists ever came, they left a long time ago. Like so much of small-town America, today there are few jobs, no industry and a cycle of poverty that engulfs the area. When the high school closed in the early 1980s, businesses soon followed.

Today, the median income sits around $14,000 a year. Methamphetamine abuse is so rampant, residents call their home the meth capital of Appalachia.

The downtown has two florists and a few other businesses, but most of the buildings are dilapidated. Chapman Restaurant was once a thriving place where locals came for supper. Now, its walls stand as a facade, a sign of what once was.

The best thing the tiny town has going for it is two exits off Interstate 75 — a developer’s dream. That’s what got the attention of the developers of Rocky Top.

They had pitched their plan before. The people in Townsend sent them packing.

But in Lake City, they found many eager townspeople, wanting jobs and willing to call their home by a different name. More than 500 people packed Main Street Baptist Church last fall for a bean and cornbread social. Most were interested in the venture, but not everybody.

“Get rid of the drugs!” one woman hollered. “Stop the drugs!”

The plans were approved. The town grew excited.

Less excited were the owners of the song’s copyright and property trademark. They filed suit to block the name change.

“Rocky Top is a world-famous and distinctive mark that popularly conjures notions of the copyrighted song owned by House of Bryant,” says the suit, filed in U.S. District Court. “Lake City’s attempt to change its name to Rocky Top represents an unlawful government taking and violation of House of Bryant’s due process rights.”

Judge Thomas A. Varlan heard legal arguments Monday in Knoxville on whether to issue a preliminary injunction that would put the plans on hold — a decision that could, perhaps, decide the fate of the town. The judge took the case under advisement and will issue his ruling later, court clerk Julie Norwood said.

The fight here is very real. It pits those wanting what they feel is best for the town against those who cherish its storied history, when forebears in the coal mines fought a war against the Tennessee National Guard.

And the name change raises serious questions. At what lengths should a town go to try to save its economy? In an era when sports franchises sell the names of stadiums to the highest bidders, does the fight in Lake City foreshadow something greater in America? What if Microsoft threatened to leave the city of Redmond, Washington, if it didn’t change its name?

And will changing the town name to Rocky Top lead to prosperity or broken promises?

A haven for ‘poor man’s cocaine’

George Robinson has clipped hair for 43 years at City Barber Shop. He points to a mud puddle out front that’s been there ever since he opened. When cars go by, “it splashes plumb to the top.”

If the puddle ain’t been fixed all these years, pardon him for being a bit skeptical. Don’t get him wrong. He’s all for the project “if it materializes like it’s supposed to.”

“I’m waiting to see somebody exchange some money,” the barber says.

A stuffed wild turkey with a 6-inch gobbler stares from the wall. His dog Buddy, a pit bull mix, ambles over, sniffs a stranger’s knees and huffs before moseying back to his red canopy bed.

“I think it’s a silly-ass name,” says Ricky Seeber.

The others in the shop kick heels and laugh.

Seeber hails from a mining family; his dad and grandparents worked the mines. Seeber didn’t like how the developers came in with their ultimatum: “No name change, no jobs. That’s about what it amounted to.”

“Just the name change: I don’t like it,” he says.

“Yeah, Rocky Top,” another snorts.

“You too, George?”

The barber pauses with his clippers. He’s seen the town go from a fine community 40 years ago to where it is now: a haven for “poor man’s cocaine.”

“If it can help young people get a job, it don’t bother me,” he says. “Used to be a booming place.”

From what the barber sees and hears, he guesses about 75% of the town is ready to go all Rocky Top. “About everybody is for it, because they see that the town is continuously going down.”

“But when it opens up,” Seeber chimes in, “it might be more than what you wanted.”

“Yeah, well, like everything else,” the barber says, “you gotta take the good with the bad. As long as it brings in the work, everybody’s for it.”

The clippers buzz. Buddy sits largely oblivious, drifting in and out of sleep, glancing up only when an occasional truck drives by.

Rocky Top is the talk in town. The week CNN visited, the Tennessee state House and Senate approved the name change. Eighteen eighth-graders were bused to the state capitol in Nashville to witness the historic House vote.

The City Council now must ratify the legislature’s approval, but it has said it won’t act until the judge makes a decision on the lawsuit.

The House of Bryant, owned by the sons of Boudleaux and Felice Bryant, who wrote “Rocky Top,” said they felt that they had “no choice but to commence a lawsuit” after “their efforts to reach an understanding with Lake City” were unsuccessful.

“The Bryants,” the family said in a written statement, “hope that this matter can be resolved quickly.”

Two interstate exits and a huge opportunity

Anderson County Commissioner Tim Isbel shows off an array of impressive artistic renditions of the various phases of the Rocky Top plans, including a renovation of the entire downtown district that would transform it into one of the nicest-looking small towns in the South.

There are drawings of the water park, including an indoor pavilion that will bring in light and produce four rainbows at all times, and other big plans. The first phase is estimated to cost $20 million; all four phases, including the amusement park, could cost upward of $450 million, he says.

It’s easy to see why a town that has so little is so eager. The development is projected to create 175 to 225 jobs and bring in $50 million in revenue, including $6 million in taxes for the town. Lake City’s current annual budget is $3 million.

“We just see this as an opportunity to get this end of the county back to what it used to be. Give individuals places to work,” Isbel says.

Does he have any nostalgia for the loss of the name Lake City?

“We just want to see this happen for the community,” Isbel says. “There’s just so much magic in the name. Not the song, the name Rocky Top.”

The new name also speaks to the region’s mining heritage, he says. “Where does any coal come from? It comes from a rocky top.”

Isbel formed the Rocky Top Tennessee Marketing and Manufacturing Co. last year after the two original developers, Buddy Warren and Brad Coriell, proposed the idea. Warren was in a traumatic car crash late in the fall and is no longer part of the development, Isbel says.

Isbel has brought together eight prominent families — “the dream team” — as members of his board. The other original developer, Coriell, an artist based out of Nashville, also sits on the board.

Isbel emphasizes that this is not pie-in-the-sky stuff, that he believes this is a once-in-a-generation opportunity to save the town. Everyone on the board, aside from Coriell, lives in the area and has “a vested interest in making this community better.”

“They want to give back and do what they can to get this venture started.”

Isbel almost gets misty-eyed when he recalls an event at the middle school. He had come prepared to talk about the rides and other fun stuff that may eventually come to town. None of the kids asked about that. They wanted to know whether there would be jobs available when they graduate high school.

In 18 months, he told them, the water park will open (assuming the lawsuit doesn’t block Rocky Top).

Winding down the roads of Lake City, Isbel points out the 300 acres where the water park would go and the eventual sites of the rest of the development.

“What other town do you see that has two exits and has all this available area?”

Lake City Vice Mayor Michael Lovely has longtime roots. His father was the mayor for decades and is the one who was instrumental in getting both exits off the interstate. Back then, his father was teased by locals: Why did this tiny town need two exits?

“They kinda gave him a hard time,” Lovely says. “That’s just what I’m saying. He seen the future.”

‘Embrace your heritage’

At the top of Militia Hill, Barry Thacker looks down upon the town. He can hardly contain his disdain for all that has transpired.

As the head of the Coal Creek Watershed Foundation, by accident Thacker helped bring about the whole Rocky Top thing. And he hates it.

Thacker and others had worked for years to get a building suitable for a state-of-the-art Coal Creek Miner’s Museum, a place that would honor the region’s mining past.

That building was finally secured last year, and officials celebrated the feat. It drew media attention — and that’s what caught the attention of the Rocky Top developers. They licked their chops at the two interstate exists and the vast land available.

To Thacker, it feels like the miner’s museum — which will still go ahead — got lost amid the fray. Plus, changing the town name to Rocky Top is just stupid, he says.

“You embrace your heritage. You don’t run away from it. They made the mistake once before; they changed the name from its heritage to Lake City. It didn’t bring tourists. Now, they’re doing it again.”

You get the feeling Thacker wants to spit. It’s left that bad of a taste in his mouth.

“Don’t embrace the words of a song to try to make yourself into something you’re not,” he says. “And that’s what I see it doing. The only way you get out of this poverty is to get an education and get the kids to college so they can qualify for high-paying jobs. But none of that seems to be the focus.”

A renowned engineer based out of Knoxville, Thacker knows that when something sounds too good to be true, it usually is. He fears land speculation and the possibility the development may never come to fruition. Already, one local has gone from a $500,000 asking price for his property to $3 million.

Fixing the schools and educating the area children, Thacker says, would be money better spent. But that’s a much tougher fight.

“You’re dang right,” he says.

His foundation teamed up with the nearby community of Briceville to provide the local schoolchildren a way out. Over the past decade, the foundation sent 33 youths to college on nearly $300,000 in scholarships.

“It’s a dedicated effort to get the kids to college that I’m afraid those in Lake City have convinced everybody you don’t need to do that,” he says. “Their message is, ‘Rocky Top will do it for you.’ I just think that’s the wrong message.”

Thacker helped preserve Militia Hill, where he now stands. It was here where miners fought the Tennessee National Guard in 1891 in what is known as the Coal Creek War.

The mining companies had brought in prisoners to work the mines for free. The miners took up arms, eventually capturing the convicts and the guards and putting them on a train back to Knoxville. They sent a telegram to the governor: Convicts aren’t going to steal our jobs.

The governor dispatched the Tennessee National Guard. The war ensued. Battles and skirmishes lasted over a year. The miners lost the war but won the long-term battle. Mining companies were ordered to stop using convicts.

But tragedy struck on May 19, 1902, when a mine explosion killed 216 men — leaving only three men alive in the community of Fraterville. It remains one of the largest mine disasters in U.S. history.

At 93, Louise Nelson is one of the closest descendants to that disaster. Her great-grandmother had five caskets in her home at one time, “because five of her boys were killed.”

Nelson had wanted to go to the state legislature for years to propose changing the name of Lake City back to its Coal Creek origins. But she felt that she didn’t have the political muscle.

She wishes she’d pushed harder. “This is the heritage of so many people and all those people killed in that mine. I just feel like it’s desecrating their names and everything by changing the name to Rocky Top.”

She chooses her words cautiously. She’s too polite to let on how angry the name change makes her.

“I’m speaking up because there’s not many of us left,” says Nelson. “It’s a sadness with me. A hurtfulness. I feel like I have to stand up for my grandparents and all these people and my heritage. I don’t believe in staying in the past. You get nowhere with that, but I do want to preserve my heritage.”

To her, Rocky Top will never be home sweet home.

 

 

 

 

http://wtvr.com/2014/05/05/tennessee-towns-rocky-road-to-becoming-rocky-top/

 

CANON CITY – A man accused of killing a mother and her two young children in March may have been strung out on meth and alcohol during the crimes.

The unsealed arrest affidavit for Jaacob VanWinkle tells a terrifying story of what happened inside the Canon City home in early March.

VanWinkle has been charged with two counts of murder, kidnapping and sexual assault on a child. He’s being held without bond in the Fremont County Jail.

VanWinkle’s arrest affidavit says he dated 35-year-old Mandy Folsom at the time of the murder. The two had been broken up for two weeks.

According to court documents the night of March 8, VanWinkle came over to the house to watch TV. VanWinkle told police he left the home after watching TV to get “some methamphetamine” from an acquaintance.

Folsom and her two children – Marissa, 9, and Mason, 5 – were found dead in the Canon City home. While the records don’t indicated the cause of death, they mention a knife was found at the scene.

Police found the bodies after a teenage girl reported being raped.

According to court documents, VanWinkle sexually assaulted her twice before passing out. The teen told police VanWinkle took several pills of her mother’s as well.

The affidavit says VanWinkle admitted to raping the girl but denied committing the murders.

According to court records, investigators found the victims in a bedroom, some of them were gagged and bound.

VanWinkle told detectives he found the bodies in the home but didn’t call police because he was a wanted fugitive. Court records indicate the 31-year-old told detectives he “stayed up all night as he was high on meth and paranoid.”

“He didn’t check on [one victim] to see if she was alive because he knew she was alive based on some movement he could hear in her bedroom,” according to the arrest affidavit.

VanWinkle is in court in June.

 

 

 

 

http://www.9news.com/story/news/local/2014/05/05/jaacob-vanwinkle-murder-suspect/8724457/

 

ANDERSON – Officers say they arrested three people as part of an ongoing campaign to reduce crime in the Anderson Heights neighborhood.

Police on Monday conducted a traffic stop on Cavan Stephen Murphy, 29, of Cottonwood, as he was entering the neighborhood from Ponderosa Way. Anderson Heights is a neighborhood tucked off Highway 273 just west of the intersection with Pinion Avenue, just north the Shasta Outlets.

Officer Casey Day said Murphy had an outstanding arrest warrant for possessing drug paraphernalia and admitted that he was carrying drugs. Police searched the vehicle and found three bags of crystal methamphetamine, a digital scale and a used meth pipe, Day said.

Murphy was arrested on the warrant and on suspicion of possessing and transporting meth.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.redding.com/news/2014/may/06/anderson-police-arrest-3-anderson-heights-neighbor/

 

 

COSHOCTON — As authorities continue to discuss possible charges in relation to stolen goods at a local scrapyard, the married couple who lived there were in court Monday for arraignment on drug charges.

Howard Berger, 44, and Rhonda St. John-Berger, 33, both of Newcomerstown, pleaded not guilty during separate arraignments in front of Coshocton County Common Pleas Judge Robert Batchelor. Scheduling conferences for trial will be at 2 p.m. May 27 for both.

Rhonda St. John-BergerHoward Berger

Berger recently was indicted by a grand jury on one count of trafficking in drugs, a third-degree felony; one count of trafficking in drugs, a fourth-degree felony; and one count of aggravated trafficking in drugs, a first-degree felony.

St. John-Berger was indicted on one count of aggravated possession of a controlled substance, a second-degree felony.

The couple were arrested and charged with aggravated trafficking in drugs April 3 by the Coshocton County Sheriff’s Office. An undercover drug buy led authorities to the scrapyard, where 40 grams of methamphetamine was found.

In addition, firearms, cash and property that had been reported stolen, including vehicles from several counties and other states, were recovered.

More charges are possible in connection with the case, as the sheriff’s office is conducting interviews and working with the Coshocton County Prosecutor’s Office after the recovery of more than $500,000 in stolen property from R&Z Cores scrapyard, 22375 Oxford Township Road 105.

Batchelor quipped St. John-Berger’s file was a little thick, which “is never a good sign.” She played with a necklace she wore as she answered Batchelor’s questions. She left the court before Berger’s hearing.

Berger appeared jovial, laughing as he didn’t understand Judge Batchelor’s order to sit at the defendant’s table and later smiled as Batchelor asked him whether he had any money that would allow him to hire a lawyer.

Berger will be represented by Coshocton County Public Defender Jeff Mullen, and St. John-Berger by Robert Weir, as appointed by the court.

Berger remains incarcerated at the Coshocton County Justice Center on a $100,000 cash or surety bond. St. John-Berger was released April 24 from the jail after paying $500, or 10 percent of a $5,000 bond.

This was the second time her bond was reduced and paid. Previously, St. John-Berger was caught trespassing at the scrapyard and returned to the justice center after she was directly told not to go there by authorities. She was found with a blue duffel bag containing clothes and no contraband, the sheriff’s office said.

According to court documents, she is staying with a relative in Dover. Provisions of her second release included a 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew, random drug testing and electronic monitoring.

 

 

 

 

http://www.coshoctontribune.com/article/20140505/NEWS01/305050008/Couple-arraigned-court-after-scrap-yard-meth-bust?nclick_check=1

 

31-year-old Chrystal Gail Stikeleather of Liberty Lane in Taylorsville was arrested by Hickory Police at about 3:30 Saturday afternoon (May 3) for felony possession of methamphetamine and misdemeanor possession of drug paraphernalia.

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She was arrested when an Officer on routine patrol at the Days Inn on 13th Avenue Drive N.W. saw Stikeleather exit a vehicle and walk quickly behind the building before entering through the front door.

The Officer asked her to come out and observed that she was behaving nervously. Stikeleather was carrying four bags. She gave consent to search, but attempted to remove a small plastic bag from one of the larger bags. In the bag was a clear, crystal, rock-like substance.

As the search continued, Officers found four plastic bags, digital scales, straws, rolling papers, an empty hypodermic needle and another hypodermic needle loaded with an orange substance. In all, 5.6 grams of meth was found.

Stikeleather was taken into custody without incident and placed in the Catawba Co. Detention Facility under a $20,000 secured bond. She will make a first appearance in District Court on May 7 in Newton.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.whky.com/archive/item/1693-taylorsville-woman-faces-felony-meth-charge-in-hickory

 

Lake Oswego police arrested a Tualatin woman Sunday, accusing her of possessing methamphetamine.

On Sunday around noon, a Lake Oswego police officer noticed a car driving back and forth between hotels near Bangy and Meadows roads. The police officer then learned the vehicle was associated with 33-year-old Rhiannon Alexandria Miller, who was staying at the Phoenix Inn.

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“The investigation ended up at the hotel room,” said Sgt. Tom Hamman, Lake Oswego Police Department spokesman. “She had meth on her and she was on probation.”

Police arrested Miller on suspicion of unlawful possession of methamphetamine and on a warrant for violation of probation.

During their search of the hotel room, police also found evidence of identity theft.

“Inside the room we found some identity theft stuff, like gift cards and people’s personal info,” Hamann said, adding more charges are likely.

“There are several other people that are probably related, but we haven’t arrested them at this point,” Hamann said. “We’re essentially continuing the investigation and sending the evidence to the district attorney’s office.”

Police took Miller to Clackamas County Jail. Her bail is set at $15,000.

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.oregonlive.com/lake-oswego/index.ssf/2014/05/tualatin_woman_arrested_for_me.html

 

Federal authorities have charged a California man with drug distribution after a state trooper found more than a gallon of liquid of methamphetamine inside the man’s vehicle during a Carson County traffic stop last month.

On April 23, a Department of Public Safety trooper patrolling in Carson County stopped a 1995 Toyota Corolla about 6:30 p.m. on a reported traffic violation of failing to signal a lane change. The trooper interviewed the driver, Leonardo Moreno-Aguilar and noticed
several indicators of possible criminal behavior, according to a federal criminal complaint.

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Another Spanish-speaking trooper arrived and quizzed the man. Moreno-Aguilar was issued a warning ticket and one of the troopers asked for consent to search the car. Moreno-Aguilar consented to the search, according to court records.

During the search, troopers found two, one-gallon antifreeze containers and two plastic containers containing liquid methamphetamine. The methamphetamine weighed roughly 20 pounds.

A DEA agent and another DPS officer then came to assist with the investigation, and another officer read Moreno-Aguilar his constitutional rights. The man then agreed to talk to officers and said he was supposed to deliver the drugs to Charleston, S.C., and would be given directions to a commercial business when he arrived in Charleston.

According to the complaint, Moreno-Aguilar told officers he met a man he knew only as “Gringo” at car races in Mexico and that the man asked him to drive a car to make some money. Moreno-Aguilar said he was to be paid $3,000 for the drug delivery but said he did not know how much drugs he was transporting.

Moreno-Aguilar will remain in federal custody pending further hearings in the case.

 

 

 

 

 

http://amarillo.com/news/local-news/2014-05-05/feds-charge-man-found-liquid-meth