Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

19-year-old Darschae Jamahl Nichols of Old Conover Startown Road in Newton was arrested by Hickory Police early Saturday morning (May 10) on one felony count of possession of methamphetamine and one misdemeanor count of possession of drug paraphernalia.

f4a51cb98112a3d879856e0d66de3464_S

Nichols was arrested at about 3:50 a.m. after he pulled out in front of an Officer on the 400 block of Highway 70 S.W. He initially couldn’t find the vehicle registration and a passenger in the vehicle was laid back in the seat, as if asleep.

Nichols got out and gave consent to search. A digital scale with marijuana residue was found in his pants pocket. A search of the vehicle turned up a plastic bag containing 7.4 grams of meth. Nothing was found on the passenger’s person.

Nichols was taken into custody without incident and placed in the Catawba Co. Detention Facility under a $12,000 secured bond. He was scheduled to make a first appearance in District Court today (May 12) in Newton.

 

 

 

http://www.whky.com/archive/item/1769-newton-teen-faces-felony-meth-charge

 

 

Jakarta. Customs officers at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Tangerang on Saturday arrested a Ugandan national carrying 83 capsules of crystal methamphetamine in her stomach, officials said.

“After investigating, it turned out the suspect swallowed 83 capsules of crystal meth,” Soekarno-Hatta customs head Okto Irianto said on Monday, as quoted by state-run Antara News Agency.

The accused smuggler, who flew in from Doha, Qatar, had swallowed 1.2 kilograms of meth in total, worth up to Rp 1.6 billion ($140,000), according to police.

Dug mules often carry illegal cargo inside their bodies to avoid detection, although the risk of death would be substantial if even one capsule were to burst.

Officials pulled aside the 46-year-old suspect — identified by her initials, T.M. — because she was acting suspiciously as she passed through customs.

She was brought to a hospital for an x-ray scan, which revealed the capsules. Police gave her a laxative to help force them through her system.

Okto said the suspect worked as an English and geography teacher in Uganda. He said she was part of a larger network and that also operated in Kenya.

“Previously, we arrested a perpetrator [from Kenya] who swallowed 93 capsules,” Okto said. He did not provide further information.

Soekarno-Hatta Police deputy drug division chief Adj. Comr. Subekti said that the suspect could face 15 years in prison and a Rp 10 billion ($870,000) fine if convicted.

Drug trafficking is punishable by death under Indonesian law.

Two Indonesians — S., 35 amd A.I., 32 — were arrested in Central Jakarta in connection to the same crime, police said, according to Indonesian news portal MetroTVNews.com.

 

 

 

 

http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/news/jakarta/alleged-drug-mule-detained-83-meth-capsules-stomach/

 

Christopher S. Dixon told his roommate on Thursday that he was making methamphetamine so he could pay his rent for the apartment where they lived in Bethlehem.

christopher-dixon-cca7c8dac8ff9e22

After a fire Thursday afternoon did significant damage to the home’s third floor, authorities say they discovered two meth labs — one in the basement and the other in the third floor of 746 Linden St., city police said.

Dixon and Derrick Bradley rented the second and third floors of the two-unit building, police say in court papers.

Police interviewed Bradley, who called Dixon his “friend and roommate,” court papers say.

Just prior to the 12:30 p.m. fire, Dixon came downstairs to the kitchen carrying a bucket, Bradley told police, according to court papers. Dixon “appeared excited,” and Bradley asked him if he was “making meth,” court papers say.

Dixon allegedly responded, “Yes, I need money for rent,” court papers say.

-81b3e2d38d246e16-44ee5475d0e92721-b6db5fec2a4e99f6

-ab436a9c0a5ad3ce  -1f16c43fa739aed8  -96db2cf234071d5b -dd1ba33f1e335d40

Dixon filled the bucket with water and ran back upstairs, moments before Bradley smelled smoke, court papers say. Soon after, Dixon came down stairs and ran off, court papers say.

Bradley told police that he knew Dixon was making meth, but he didn’t think Dixon was doing it in the apartment, court papers say.

An hour before the fire, neighbors reported seeing garbage bags being thrown from the third floor into the backyard, court papers say. Police found the bags, and a vapor appeared to be emanating from them, court papers say. There was white sludge and plastic tubing in the bags, court papers say.

Pennsylvania State Police were called and determined the bags contained residue from the process of making meth, court papers say. A subsequent search warrant for the home revealed several items and pieces of equipment that were used in the making of meth, court papers say.

Police were called Friday night to the 300 block of East Broad Street for reports of Dixon being sighted in that area, according to city police. When police arrived, they say Dixon attempted to hide behind the Steel City Tattoo Shop on East Broad Street. He was arrested and taken into custody, police.

Dixon was arraigned 3 a.m. Saturday before on-call District Judge Todd Strohe on charges of manufacturing, delivery or possession with the intent to deliver drugs, possession of a controlled substance, causing a catastrophe, recklessly endangering another person, use or possession of drug paraphernalia, operating a meth lab and illegal dumping of chemical waste. He was sent to Northampton County Prison in lieu of $50,000 bail.

Police say they expect to make more arrests in the case.

Police say there was a burglary reported Sunday afternoon at 746 Linden St. Someone had gained access to the home by shattering a backdoor window, police say. There were holes found in the plaster walls of the building, but it was unclear if anything was missing, according to authorities.

 

 

 

http://www.lehighvalleylive.com/bethlehem/index.ssf/2014/05/man_charged_in_bethlehem_meth.html

 

 

 

LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP, MI — Deputies are seeking charges against a Van Buren County man after methamphetamine paraphernalia was found in his front lawn over the weekend.

The Van Buren County Sheriff Narcotics Unit went to the home in the 55000 block of Butcher Road in Lawrence Township on Friday after receiving a tip that a fugitive was seen there, according to a news release. The wanted suspect was not found at the home, but officers did find drug paraphernalia and items used to cook methamphetamine on the front lawn.

14922841-large

After obtaining a search warrant, investigators found an active one-pot meth lab, multiple used one-pot meth labs, multiple HCL gas generators, and paraphernalia used for smoking meth. The items were found inside the home, in the backyard and inside a vehicle parked on the property.

Investigators have determined that the suspect, a 28-year-old man, was staying at the home with a 34-year-old woman. Neither of them has been located by police yet. The investigation is ongoing, but police expect to pursue drug-related charges against the suspects.

 

 

 

http://www.mlive.com/news/kalamazoo/index.ssf/2014/05/lawrence_man_arrested_after_me.html

 

 

 

A report of a disturbance in the area of 227 Jackson Ave. on Friday led to the arrest of a Norfolk woman.

Capt. Mike Bauer with the Norfolk Police Division said officers was dispatched at 5:24 p.m. regarding a disturbance between a man and a woman.

When officers arrived, they spoke with the man, who informed them that he had recovered a glass pipe, a marijuana pipe and marijuana from the woman — Kendra Liibbe, 25.

He provided the items to the officers and explained that there had been a struggle to recover the items.

Liibbe was questioned about the items, and the glass pipe tested positive for methamphetamine.

Liibbe was placed under arrest for possession of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia. She was housed in the Norfolk city jail and later transferred to the Madison County jail.

 

 

 

http://norfolkdailynews.com/news/briefs/woman-arrested-for-drugs/article_e66f8e16-d9e6-11e3-9386-001a4bcf6878.html

 

 

Richmond County sheriff’s deputies say they discovered an active methamphetamine lab Sunday when a teen called to report his mother beating her boyfriend with a bat.

The 13-year-old asked a neighbor to call police about 3:30 p.m. after the fighting began in his mother’s Lake Forest Drive apartment.

13352647

According to a sheriff’s office incident report, Ronnie Patricia Walters, 44, was arguing with her live-in boyfriend, Steven Robert Sizemore Jr., 31, because he didn’t have a job.

The argument escalated when Walters took a baseball bat and hit Sizemore several times, police said, and Sizemore suffered scratches to his torso and little finger. Deputies did not see any injuries to Walters other than sores from possible drug use.

While trying to find the bat in the apartment, deputies discovered a glass container of methamphetamine and a working lab, authorities said.

Walters and Sizemore were charged with trafficking methamphetamine, manufacturing methamphetamine, presence of a child during the manufacture of methamphetamine and possession of a controlled substance. Walters was also charged with simple battery.

 

 

 

 

 

http://chronicle.augusta.com/news/crime-courts/2014-05-12/cops-called-ball-bat-fight-find-meth?v=1399901550

 

Former Arapahoe County Sheriff Pat Sullivan has been charged with violating terms of his probation after testing positive for methamphetamine and alcohol, according to a court document.

forsale

Sullivan, 71, who was convicted in a meth-for-sex case in 2012, is also accused of leaving the state without permission from Jan. 25 to Feb. 5.

“On February 6, 2014, the defendant acknowledged he made a bad choice in traveling out of state without probation,” according to a complaint for revocation of probation.

Sullivan also failed to provide required urine screens on numerous occasions since being sentenced to 38 days in jail and two years’ probation in 2012, according to the complaint.

He failed to provide drug screens most recently on April 10, 2014.

He tested positive for meth use on Sept. 13 and Sept. 25, 2013, and on March 3, 2014. He tested postitive for alcohol four times from April 30, 2012, to Aug. 8, 2013.

It is at least the third time that Sullivan has violated probation.

In March, after failing a urine screen, Sullivan and his probation officer agreed to extend his probationary period for three months so he could “comply with the conditions of supervision ordered by the court,” according to court documents.

The order, signed March 17 by Sullivan and the probation officer, did not specify what banned substance surfaced in the screening. His probation was extended to July 3.

Sullivan also violated probation in 2012. In July 2012, a “special report” was filed by the probation department stating that he was required to wear a SCRAM alcohol-monitoring device.

He has been summoned to appear before Arapahoe County District Court Judge William Blair Sylvester on Thursday to respond to the charges.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_25746009/meth-booze-snare-former-arapahoe-sheriff-pat-sullivan

 

 

Patrick Sullivan tests positive for Methamphetamine

CENTENNIAL – 9Wants to Know has learned former Arapahoe County Sheriff Pat Sullivan has tested positive for methamphetamine three times while on probation.

1399907027000-patrick-sullivan

Not only is Sullivan accused of testing positive for meth, he’s also accused of skipping out on numerous drug tests, leaving the state of Colorado without permission and testing positive for alcohol.

The former sheriff, who was arrested during a drug sting in November 2011, will stand before a judge on Thursday for a probation-revocation hearing.

According to court paperwork, Sullivan tested positive for meth twice in September 2012 and on March 3, 2014.

His court summons also says he failed to provide urine screens more than 30 times since May 21, 2012.

Sullivan tested positive for alcohol four times according to the court paperwork and left the state for a period of two weeks earlier this year without permission.

Earlier this year, 9Wants to Know reported Sullivan had his probation extended to July 3 because of a positive urine screen.

Sullivan was sentenced to 38 days in jail and probation for two years after he pleaded guilty to soliciting a prostitute and to possessing meth in April 2012.

 

 

 

 

http://www.9news.com/story/news/investigations/2014/05/12/patrick-sullivan-meth/8995665/

 

 

LAFAYETTE, Indiana — Kevin Shepard moved into Room 232 at Knights Inn in Lafayette weeks ago with his fiancee and 3-year-old child to escape a house contaminated with mold. On Friday, the family learned that their temporary refuge might be even more hazardous.

It had been used to manufacture methamphetamine.

More than two years ago, the Tippecanoe County Health Department declared Room 232 unfit for human occupancy and ordered the motel’s managers to hire a state-certified company to test contamination levels. But Ron Noles, the county health department’s chief environmentalist, said he’s received no documentation that the managers ever complied with the order.

“I think he tried to skirt the law, save a buck,” Noles said, adding that he wields no power to fine or cite noncompliant property owners.

Shepard said he had no idea the room had been used as a meth lab until the Journal & Courier (http://on.jconline.com/RGKMA1 ) knocked on his door Friday afternoon.

“They shouldn’t have given us this room until it was totally inspected,” he said, noting that management didn’t mention meth when they offered him a new room Friday. They simply cited a need to remodel the room.

Deven Patel, manager of the motel, declined to comment about the situation, but Noles said Patel told him Friday afternoon that he had hired a meth-remediation company to test contamination levels in the room.

The lesson of this and other episodes is clear: The next time you check into an inexpensive motel, you might just want to sniff around under the bed. The guests who stayed in the room before you might have been cooking up a batch of methamphetamine.

Police report that they busted two such motel-room meth operations in greater Lafayette in recent weeks. They removed meth-making chemicals from a room at Prestige Inn in West Lafayette on April 30, then dismantled an active meth lab in a room at Economy Inn in Lafayette on May 1.

Authorities posted bright red and yellow signs outside Room 78 at Economy Inn, warning the public that the room is “unfit for human habitation” and will remain so until cleaned and deemed safe by a state-certified meth-remediation team.

Manufacturing methamphetamine in a motel room is a serious felony in Indiana, but those convicted of the crime aren’t the only ones who pay.

Property owners, who are among the many victims cooking meth creates, are stuck at times shouldering the burden of expensive cleanup efforts. Damages are even costlier when lost room revenue and a tarnished public image are factored in.

Ryan Weaver, owner of Rossville-based Bio Recovery Specialists, said his line of business — cleaning up former meth labs — has been particularly “lucrative” lately. That has him thinking, he said, that some motel guests who cook meth are getting away with it and leaving safety hazards behind when they check out.

“The sad thing is, we will probably see more and more people exposed to that situation where they have stayed in a hotel room that has been used as a drug lab,” Weaver said.

The incident last month was not the first time meth-making materials were found at Prestige Inn. A previous incident was reported to the Tippecanoe County Health Department in November 2012. In that case, an operational meth lab was found.

Jagdish Patel, who serves as general manager for both Prestige Inn and Economy Inn, declined to comment on how the costs of testing and remediation are affecting his business.

A total of five motel room meth busts have been reported at Tippecanoe County motels since December 2011.

Dozens of active meth labs and chemical dump sites have been reported during that time in houses, apartments, garages, vehicles, alleys, lots and roadsides, according to health department data.

Law enforcement agencies are required by Indiana law to report meth labs to state police, the criminal justice institute and local fire and health departments, but Tippecanoe County Health Department environmentalist Craig Rich said police probably aren’t catching 100 percent of meth labs, meaning some contaminated spaces may not be getting cleaned up.

“That might be something that’s slipping through the cracks,” he said.

Respiratory problems rank highest on the list of health concerns precipitated by living spaces contaminated with meth-making byproducts, Rich said. Depending on how a structure is built, he added, those concerns could extend well beyond the immediate area where the lab was located.

“When you’re dealing with a hotel, where the heating and cooling units are all interconnected, that can spread to other rooms,” he said.

Noles said any suspicion that a place may have been contaminated by a meth lab should be reported to local authorities or the Indiana State Police drug task force. There’s an online form to report suspected meth activity directly to the state.

Noles said a strong chemical odor is among the telltale signs of a meth lab.

Weaver described the smell as “pungent” or “biting.” It doesn’t take long, he said, for the airborne chemicals to inflict severely itchy eyes or a headache.

Trooper Wes Ennis, a member of ISP’s meth suppression team, said the odor is difficult to describe, but distinct.

“Just like marijuana smells like marijuana, meth chemicals smell like meth chemicals,” he said.

In addition to the chemical odor, authorities warn that the presence of meth-making materials should also raise a red flag. Cold packs with ammonia nitrate, battery packs with lithium strips, pseudoephedrine that often comes in blister packs, tubing, glass jars — these are all used to manufacture the stimulant, Weaver said.

Ennis said if something looks suspicious, people should report it. He’d rather that an officer determines a complaint to be unfounded than let dangerous contaminants go unchecked.

Ennis said he was among those who responded to remove dangerous materials from Prestige Inn.

“They had solvent in jars that there was still meth suspended in,” he said. “So we still had the product and also a solvent, a chemical, on the scene.”

West Lafayette police officers found about four grams of a white powdery substance that field-tested positive for meth, plus several items of paraphernalia and two Mason jars with wet white residue in the Prestige room, according to a probable cause affidavit filed by the Tippecanoe County Prosecutor’s Office. They took two occupants into custody and removed a sleeping 2-year-old from the room.

Because the defendants had apparently not used their room to cook new product, Ennis said, the threat level was fairly low, making cleanup relatively easy.

Economy Inn wasn’t so lucky.

Lafayette officers arrived at the motel to serve a warrant when they smelled a strong odor commonly associated with meth-making. They entered a room and discovered meth “in the process of being manufactured,” according to a press release. The man who rented the room and two guests were arrested.

When an active lab is discovered in a densely populated area such as a motel, Ennis said, officers will evacuate adjoining rooms as well until they are deemed safe. He said chemicals used to manufacture the stimulant drug pose a fire hazard and are also physically dangerous, burning flesh when touched or inhaled.

“It will do internal damage to your lungs, esophagus, everything else,” he said.

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management prohibits the owner of a contaminated structure from occupying it or “transferring any interest in the property to another person,” unless and until the building is decontaminated or demolished.

Ennis said property owners are responsible for costly testing and remediation and that demolition is, in some cases, the most cost-effective option.

The ISP meth suppression team is tasked with removing immediate hazards from a freshly discovered meth lab, but it’s up to county health department officials, Ennis said, to determine if a structure is habitable again.

The owner of a contaminated property must then seek out an IDEM-approved inspector — such as Weaver or Zac Osborn, who owns Indiana State Decontamination — to test contamination levels before and after cleanup.

Osborn said most of the jobs landed by his company have fallen in the $4,000-$6,000 range. One outlier cost more than $10,000.

Weaver said costs for his company’s services vary between $3,000-$10,000 depending on the square footage involved, the extent of contamination and the materials contaminated. He said remediation of a carpeted room with bare wood and wallpaper, for instance, would cost more than a similarly sized space with cinder block walls and a cement floor.

When called upon to decontaminate a property, Weaver said, cleaners remove all contents, including furniture, clothing, electronics, carpeting and ceiling tiles. They then vacuum the walls and spray all surfaces with a military-grade chemical that boils the meth out of the surfaces, he said.

“We will be in full hazmat suits,” Weaver said. Face respirators and double gloves protect his employees from the chemicals.

Two days later, he said, the team will conduct a post-test of their work and send the results to the state.

Once the county health department gets test results, Rich said, the property can be released for use. Getting a meth lab site cleaned and securing health department approval can go “fairly quickly,” he added, noting that motel owners could have their rooms back in service in three to four months.

Indiana law requires courts to order convicted meth manufacturers to pay for environmental cleanup costs “incurred by a law enforcement agency or other person as a result of the offense.”

Noles, the county environmental officer, said Room 232 was to be tested for meth lab contamination on Saturday. Results should be back within a few days. Meanwhile, he advised the family moving out of Room 232 to have medical checkups as a precaution.

“He still violated the law and will be responsible for any medical issues,” Noles said of the motel’s owner. Noles said he will speak with the county attorney to see whether further action can be taken as a result of the motel’s noncompliance with a health department order.

 

 

 

 

http://www.tribtown.com/view/story/c7f14ecb0f48410b9e1775c85599bfef/IN–Meth-Motels

 

 

I bought my first and only pregnancy test when I was 26.

At the time, I had been doing a lot of meth. I was fortunate if I remembered to eat one meal a day. Refilling my birth-control prescription had become just another missed detail in a life that had ceased to have much meaning for me.

I was an addict, and I was staring at two very bright pink lines on a stick.

I showed the test to my boyfriend. “What are we going to do?” I asked. He replied, “Have a baby, I guess.”

He wanted to see the pregnancy through. I was much less certain about motherhood. How would the pregnancy affect my drug and alcohol use? I don’t recall ever feeling as vulnerable and afraid as I did then.

I started drinking at age 14. Alcohol transformed me into a confident, funny and brave person. It shattered the awkward and shy shell in which I felt trapped. I found a group of new friends. I began to smoke pot and skip school. Boys seemed to find the new me far more desirable, too.

After I moved into adulthood, I became a bartender. Customers would put small packets of cocaine and meth in my tip jar, and I’d step into the beer cooler to inhale my reward.

I did everything to excess. My habits created a revolving door of friends, jobs and living arrangements. My relationship with my family was strained. I was arrested several times, yet I never considered changing my behavior.

But after I got pregnant, I did my best to do what a pregnant woman is supposed to do. I went to my prenatal appointments. I took my vitamins. I decorated a nursery.

Inside, I was terrified. I had never before tried to quit using. Being a pregnant addict was the most heart-wrenching experience of my life.

I tried to stay sober, but I couldn’t live completely clean. I was able to refrain from drug use, but I never stayed away from alcohol for long. I have memories of trying to disguise my pregnant stomach when entering liquor stores, only to return home, drink alone and cry by myself. I talked to the baby inside of me, apologizing for my shortcomings.

I felt some comfort when my best friend, Mallory, became pregnant too. She told me that if I could do it, she could do it. I was thankful to have someone going through this with me. We would get drunk and justify our behavior to one another.

Then I would wake up hungover, gripped by guilt and self-loathing, but those feelings weren’t enough to keep me sober.

Despite it all, I gave birth to a healthy daughter. She was beautiful. She had 10 fingers and 10 toes. I cried tears of joy and relief.

But I knew that I would continue using as soon as I could. I bottle-fed my daughter because breast-feeding just wasn’t an option. I balanced my habits with parenthood as well as I could.

One night while drunk, I fell off of a porch, breaking my wrist and ankle. Our young family had to move into a relative’s house while I healed. I lost my job as an administrative assistant. I couldn’t even change my daughter’s diapers.

The years passed but the drama didn’t. I kept having to pick up the pieces of my toxic existence. As my daughter grew older, I did my best to maintain appearances, give her a good life and keep my addiction from affecting her.

But when she was 4, I woke up in the midst of a blackout. A man was having sex with me in a strange apartment, and I had no recollection of him or how I’d gotten there. I was shaken. I felt I had betrayed my daughter. I felt I had betrayed my values. I finally found the courage to walk into my first meeting.

To get sober, I had to abandon my old life. My daughter’s father and I split up. I had to stay away from every single friend I had. While I was making new and meaningful relationships in recovery, I still missed my friend Mallory.

I left messages telling her about my sobriety. She never called back.

My new, sober life took me places I never imagined. I discovered I had a voice that I could use to help others. I began to work for women’s rights, lobbying across the state of Kansas. I went back to school and earned a master’s degree in public administration.

One day, while speaking at a university, I spotted Mallory in the audience. After the talk, I walked over and asked how she was. She was sober.

We got together later and shared stories of loss, pain and devastation. She had racked up multiple DUIs and a felony record. Her legal problems caused her to be separated from her son.

She was close to graduating with a degree in social work and was working at a women’s addiction treatment center. She was looking forward to her son’s return.

I had deeply mourned the loss of her friendship, and felt pure joy as she shared her success and her own journey out of using.

Our kids are now freshmen in high school. They will soon be facing decisions about whether to use alcohol and drugs.

Despite 11 years of sobriety, I worry addiction’s hereditary nature will affect my daughter. At the same time, by being honest with her, I think my story may help teach her that addiction can destroy our bodies, our relationships, our careers and so much more.

Addication is a spirit-crushing disease that favors no class or intellect, and escape is a matter of life and death. While some recover and thrive, others struggle and die, seemingly through no fault of their own. This is the stark reality that my daughter needs to know — no matter how painful it is for me to tell her.

Kari works in nonprofit management and provides women’s health, economic and social justice analysis and commentary online at www.rhrealitycheck.org.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.northcountrypublicradio.org/news/npr/310087402/addicted-and-pregnant-the-most-heart-wrenching-experience-of-my-life

 

WARSAWA man and woman were arrested Friday after police found an active meth lab in their Warsaw hotel room.

Police were called to the Comfort Inn around 12:45 p.m. after hotel staff could not get into the room after the occupants should have checked out.\

Officers arrived and found the safety lock bar on the door engaged, but could see a man sleeping on the bed.

methmugs-JPG

After several attempts, the man woke and opened the door. Police have identified the man as 33-year-old Richard Cain of Warsaw.

Officers found an active meth lab once inside the hotel room, as well as syringes and finished methamphetamine product, according to police.

Police also found 24-year-old Courtney C. Bowling of North Webster inside the room.

Cain was arrested and booked into the Kosciusko County Jail on a B felony charge of dealing, delivering, or manufacturing methamphetamine. He is being held on a $100,000 bond.

Bowling was also arrested and booked into the jail. She is being charged with possession of over three grams of methamphetamine.

Police also say Bowling was charged with possession of stolen property after the vehicle the pair drove was found to have a stolen license plate.

She is being held on $25,000 bond.

 

 

 

 

http://www.wsbt.com/news/local/2-arrested-after-meth-lab-found-in-warsaw-hotel/25929916

 

A Wellsville woman was sentenced Friday in Federal Court in Rochester to 30 months in prison on methamphetamine charges, according to a press release from U.S. Attorney William J. Hochul Jr.’s office.

U.S. District Judge Richard J. Arcara also ordered April Patterson to pay $3,143 in restitution to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Patterson was convicted of conspiracy to manufacture, possess with intent to distribute and distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine.

She was arrested after a raid on Jan. 26, 2012 at a South Main Street, Wellsville, residence uncovered items used to manufacture meth and a quantity of meth. Another search located a meth lab at a Madison Avenue residence in Wellsville.

Also arrested during the raid and convicted were her husband Jason Patterson, John Faber, Anthony Kidd and Justin McPherson. Jason Patterson and Kidd are awaiting sentencing.

Faber was sentenced on April 30 to 40 months in prison. McPherson was sentenced to 24 months in prison.

New York State Police, the Wellsville Police Department and the Drug Enforcement Administration were involved in the investigation.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.steubencourier.com/article/20140510/NEWS/140519980/10058/NEWS

 

A Mooresville man faces drug charges stemming from an arrest in Rowan County.

Donald Alan Minter, 31, is charged with felony possession of methamphetamine and felony possession or distribution of methamphetamine precursor.

Sherman Agee

BUCKHANNON, West Virginia — Buckhannon officials are considering an ordinance dealing with the cleanup of properties where methamphetamine is used or manufactured.

The ordinance would require polices to contact property owners and the city’s zoning officer when they become aware of a meth lab or precursors of manufactured drugs. It would authorize the zoning officer to shut down a property until the meth is abated.

Jody Light of the Upshur County Landlords Association tells The Exponent Telegram (http://bit.ly/1hG9yGK ) that landlords are concerned that another layer of government will address an issue already addressed by state and federal law.

The proposal is up for a first reading by City Council on May 22.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/bdd0043b5cbb4a62b136d4d43abaf978/WV–Meth-Abatement

 

A man is behind bars after he allegedly attempted to smuggle methamphetamine in canned foods hidden in the vehicle’s wall.

According to documents, Silverio Loera-Velasco attempted to smuggle more than seven pounds of meth April 19, 2014.

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) said the 24-year-old tried to cross the Gateway International Bridge in Brownsville with six canned food filled with bundles of meth.

Authorities said the canned foods were hidden in the wall of the vehicle, behind the driver’s side.

CBP officers conducted a secondary inspection where a K9 alerted them about drugs in Loera-Velasco’s vehicle.

The 24-year-old reportedly told authorities he was going to be paid $1,000 for smuggling the drugs.

Magistrate Judge Ronald Morgan is expected to arraign the Mexican national the morning of May 15.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.valleycentral.com/news/story.aspx?id=1042746

 

      TEHRAN — On the western outskirts of this city, in an industrial neighborhood of factories and dusty half-constructed lots, a metal-walled building houses women with a secret.

They are female drug addicts, a growing class of people with a habit so taboo in this traditional Islamic society that some Iranians believe they deserve death. But the modest facility here, a substance-abuse rehabilitation center for women, is one sign that attitudes are slowly changing as Iran begins to confront an uncomfortable problem that long went ignored.

The bulk of Afghan opium passes through Iran before it hits the global market, and that access has long contributed to addiction rates that are among the highest in the world. Now they are dramatically rising, particularly among women. Government agencies and international bodies provide conflicting statistics, but Iran’s Drug Control Headquarters estimates that 3 million of Iran’s 76 million citizens are addicts, more than 700,000 of them women — double the number two years ago.

“There is starting to be some recognition that addiction is a disease, not a crime,” said Massoumeh, the director of the small center, which is run by women. “But changing minds takes time.”

That is in large part because of the stigma attached to female substance abuse, as well as a heavy dose of denial about the roots and scope of the problem. At a conference on drugs in the city of Urmia this month, one government official blamed foreign meddling.

“The addiction of women to drugs is a trick by our enemies to attack Islamic values of Iranian families,” Razieh Khodadoust, the director general of the State Welfare Organization of Iran in the West Azerbaijan province, said at the conference. “The enemies of the Islamic republic are planning extensively to spread drugs among Iranian women and they are investing heavily in this project.”

IRAN0091399283945IRAN0131399284305

Hidden addiction

Finding drugs here is easy, and the vast majority of addicts use locally produced crystal methamphetamines or heroin and other opium derivatives. Even so, until recently, the mere thought of women with substance abuse problems seemed unfathomable. Shame was incentive enough for most to hide their habit, making the problem even harder to address.

“You can find drugs anywhere, anytime in Iran’s cities. Whatever you’re looking for you can get within a few minutes,” said Nahid, 27, who is seeking treatment at the rehabilitation center for her addiction to heroin and crystal meth.

IRAN0051399283585IRAN0111399284065

Due to the restrictive nature of Iranian society, women often seek out female-only spaces to get high, adding to the difficulty of tracking use. One surprising venue, according to crystal meth addicts interviewed at the rehabilitation center, are female-only beauty salons, usually operated in private homes. Many women say they were first introduced to meth by other salon customers who raved about its effectiveness in causing rapid weight loss.

Although the bulk of state efforts to combat Iran’s drug problem target traffickers, the government also sponsors strong anti-drug public awareness campaigns. But Rahmani and other officials are calling on nongovernmental organizations to help fight addiction, a battle that Iran’s religiously conservative authorities are ill-equipped to tackle.

IRAN0031399283465

Providing help

That call is part of an increasingly open national debate about how to confront the growing problem, with education and treatment efforts being led by other women who have battled addiction and gotten sober.

At the rehab center outside Tehran, Massoumeh and a small band of women are quietly trying to help female drug addicts start new lives. Operating for two years, the entire facility is little more than a collection of several large rooms surrounding a concrete and gravel courtyard. But it represents a huge improvement over previous versions of women’s rehab centers in Iran, the staff says.

When Massoumeh began working in the field 13 years ago, it was much riskier. A group of volunteers would set up tents in forested areas outside of Tehran to treat women, with no protection from law enforcement.

“I have no partners, no sponsors, but I’m known in the field of addiction, so people find us,” said Massoumeh, who asked that the facility’s name and her surname not be published because of the sensitivity of the clinic’s activities. “What we do here is based on word of mouth. You can’t advertise this.”

In addition to helping addicts get clean, using techniques that mirror international Narcotics Anonymous programs, the clinic works to prepare patients for what is often a bigger, riskier challenge — reintegrating into regular society and returning to the neighborhoods where they previously used drugs.

IRAN0041399283466IRAN00171399284545

Many female addicts use drugs with a partner, often a spouse or a boyfriend. That was the case for Nahid, who said she started shortly after getting married at age 19 and has been sober for just over three months.

“I definitely don’t need another man. My biggest dream is to get healthy, put all of this behind me and build a good life for myself,” said Nahid, who, like other patients interviewed, asked to be identified only by her first name.

Sepideh, a 33-year-old who started using drugs when she was 20, checked into the clinic in mid-April, after her employer discovered her substance-abuse problem and fired her.

She said that she had just passed the most difficult phase of withdrawal from crystal meth, which involved vivid hallucinations. After several unsuccessful attempts to get sober, she said, she hopes this time will be different.

“I want my parents to be proud of me again. They’ve abandoned me,” Sepideh said.

That sort of intolerance among family and friends is common, caregivers say, and one of many reasons why the women at the center may ultimately relapse.

“Without societal and community support,” Massoumeh said, “we can’t expect the problem to go away.”

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/middle_east/women-addicted-to-drugs-in-iran-begin-seeking-treatment-despite-taboo/2014/05/11/b11b0c59-cbb4-4f94-a028-00b56f2f4734_story.html

NORFOLK – A Norfolk woman was sentenced today to 20 years in prison for her role in a conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine.

Linda Marie Delarosa, 31, pleaded guilty on Dec. 17, 2013, according to a news release from U.S. Attorney Dana J. Boente. Starting in 2012, Delarosa, a supplier based in North Carolina, worked with others to transport methamphetamine into Hampton Roads.

Delarosa later moved to Norfolk, but kept transporting methamphetamine from North Carolina until August 2013, the release said.

At least 500 grams of methamphetamine were involved, the release said.

 

 

 

 

 

http://hamptonroads.com/2014/05/norfolk-woman-gets-20-years-role-meth-deals

 

 

AMELIA, OhioPolice in Amelia arrested three men after finding a working meth lab in a car.

Officers said they stopped the car on Main Street in Amelia before 8 p.m. Saturday.

051014-amelia-meth-bust--2--jpg051014-amelia-meth-bust--1--jpg

051014-amelia-meth-bust--4--jpg051014-amelia-meth-bust--3--jpg

Investigators said the car was originally stopped for a loud exhaust pipe and the driver’s failure to stay within the marked lanes.

Officials said that the driver acted suspiciously after he was stopped and the officer called in a K-9 unit to search the car.

Police said the driver pulled over into the parking lot of Amelia Elementary School.

When the K-9 made a hit on the car, officers said they searched the trunk and found a working meth lab.

Three men were arrested and booked into the Clermont County Jail. Their names and ages were not immediately released.

The Union Township Fire Department was called to the scene in case the chemicals caught fire.

The Clermont County Haz-Mat team disposed of the chemicals.

No other information was released about the incident or the charges the men would face.

 

 

 

http://www.wlwt.com/news/police-find-working-meth-lab-in-trunk-of-car-in-amelia/25918140

 

 

ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla. – Five people are in custody following a St. Augustine methamphetamine lab bust Friday morning.

The St. John’s County Sheriff’s Office discovered an active methamphetamine lab while serving a warrant at 7:30 a.m. at a home in the 900 block of Holmes Boulevard, according to SJSO Sgt. Catherine Payne. The warrant was obtained following numerous neighborhood complaints of alleged drug activity and a lengthy investigation by detectives, according to a release from the SJSO.

During a search of the home, investigators found two active meth labs and two inactive meth labs, the release detailed. Eighty-two grams of meth oil was also seized, along with a large amount of precursors and drug paraphernalia.

1399669640002-Denise-Nottingham1399669640001-Darlene-Clarkson1399669640003-Misty-Harris

Darlene Weaver Clarkson, 48, Denise Michelle Nottingham, 29, Theron Anthony Taylor, 37, Misty Lou Harris, 39 and 32-year-old were taken into custody and decontaminated for toxins that was associated with the labs.

1399669640000-Brandon-Corbin1399669640004-Theron-Taylor

 

  • Clarkson is charged with maintaining a drug dwelling.
  • Nottingham is charged with production, trafficking, possession of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia.
  • Taylor is charged with possession of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia.
  • Harris is charged with possession of a controlled substance without a prescription.
  • Corbin is charged with possession of a controlled substance without a prescription.

1399647557000-meth-bust

 

 

 

http://www.firstcoastnews.com/story/news/crime/2014/05/09/meth-lab-bust-st-augustine/8894057/

 

 

DeKALB – DeKalb police say there could be more charges in connection with a methamphetamine manufacturing ring busted in October, now that the last suspect has been caught and returned to Illinois.

x6y8s0vmwhwmem8mgzpsl5plbil3yinw_pagespeed_ic_9UDhKXte0r

John A. Melvin Jr., 33, of the 6000 block of Chessem Drive in New Port Richey, Florida, appeared in DeKalb County Court on Friday morning on allegations he possessed an ingredient used to make meth, court records show. If convicted, he could be sentenced to probation or up to seven years in prison.

“He got arrested in Florida on April 24,” DeKalb Police Sgt. Steve Lekkas said. “It took them a little bit to get him transported up here because they use a transport service.”

Melvin was among 16 or so people involved in the meth ring, which had a lab that was discovered at Travel Inn in DeKalb in October, police said.

The operation’s suspected ringleader, Thomas Wilkinson, 29, of DeKalb, was sentenced to seven years in prison Feb. 25 after he admitted to participation in meth manufacturing.

“We’ve continued to investigate that, so there’s probably going to be a couple more charges filed,” Lekkas said.

More recently, three people serving probation in connection with the ring were arrested again on suspicion of making meth in an upstairs apartment at 418 N. Eleventh St. in DeKalb.

http://www.daily-chronicle.com/2014/05/09/fla-man-arrested-on-dekalb-meth-charge/ad66zhm/

KALASIN, 10 May 2014, (NNT) – The Office of Narcotic Control Board (ONCB) has announced a major drug bust in Kalasin and Samut Prakan Province, in which more than 20,000 of methampetamine pills have been seized.

ing-default

According to police officials, two drag dealers were apprehended yesterday for possessing nearly 10,000 meth pills in Kalasin Province. Further investigation revealed that the duo was dealing with a local prison drug smuggling network. The 2 dealers confessed to their crime, saying that they were hired to transport the meth pills from a neighboring country to Kalasin. They also identified their employer who turned out to be an inmate in the provincial prison. Authorities then confronted the man and found 9 meth pills and 1.14 grams of ICE.

Meanwhile, acting on a tip-off, the ONCB Region 1 officials, together with the provincial police, raided on a house in Bangsaothong District, Samut Prakan, where they found 44 bags containing 8,800 of meth pills altogether.

The housed raided belongs to one of the 3 drag lords wanted by Chiang Rai officials, added the police.

 

 

 

http://thainews.prd.go.th/centerweb/newsen/NewsDetail?NT01_NewsID=WNSOC5705100010001

 

 

CORPUS CHRISTI (Kiii News) – Corpus Christi police arrested a man accused of selling methamphetamine out of a local hotel room in Corpus Christi Friday afternoon.

Police got a tip that a felon who was wanted in another county happened to be in our area. They found that the suspect was staying at a hotel off Leopard Street and set up surveillance at the hotel on Thursday, along with a sting operation.

3694708_G
After officers managed to purchase meth from the suspect, they got a search warrant and the Corpus Christi Police Department SWAT Team moved in and arrested him.

“I think out of, whatever county he was out of, things were probably already heated up. He was facing criminal charges there and he decided to get to this area,” CCPD Captain David Cook said. “He obviously had some connections in Corpus Christi because he was selling.”

Inside the suspect’s hotel room, police found meth, marijuana, guns, ammunition and other drug paraphernalia for distributing drugs. A female who was in the room was also arrested.

The male suspect now faces several charges.

 

 

 

 

http://www.kiiitv.com/story/25478963/swat-team-arrests-suspected-meth-dealer-at-local-hotel

 

Sworn Ibrahim family enemy Alex Macris helped to save his father from life in prison after admitting he used him as an unsuspecting drug mule to transport $13 million worth of methamphetamine oil in jerry cans, a court has heard.

Police arrested Stelios Macris, 75, after they found 50 kilograms of meth oil in the boot of his Ford Falcon station wagon and the spare bedroom of his central coast property in 2011.

1399720489120_jpg-620x349

But a court acquitted Mr Macris on Thursday after his son told the court he had “duped” his father into moving the drugs.

In giving his evidence, Alex Macris said it was “low, dog act” getting his father to cart the drugs, but did so because he never dreamt  police would pull him over.

Despite confessing the drugs were his, he will not face prosecution.

The court gave him a certificate granting him immunity from prosecution on the grounds that the evidence he gave was likely to incriminate himself.

Alex Macris married chicken and racing heiress Jessica Ingham in a lavish $500,000 wedding on Bennelong Lawn near the Opera House last year. His father was allowed to attend after his mother, Roula, posted $2 million bail.

A Sydney society family, the Inghams made their fortune through a successful horse racing operation and a poultry empire which they offloaded for $880 million in 2013. They were last valued on the BRW Rich List as having a wealth exceeding $1.1 billion.

Alex Macris is also the brother of nightclub owner John Macris – a man Michael Ibrahim was accused of conspiring to murder in 2009. A jury later acquitted Mr Ibrahim and family associate Rodney Atkinson.

In August 2011, a police informant tipped off the force’s Middle Eastern organised crime squad. Police were told Alex Macris was in possession of a large amount of methamphetamine oil and that he or an associate would be moving it from the central coast and Sydney.

Gosford District Court heard this week that detectives pulled over Stelios Macris on the F3 near Brooklyn on August 2.

In the boot of his car they found three metal drums filled with 26 kilograms of meth oil. The retiree claimed he thought it was petrol.

After police arrested the Mosman man they then searched his Phegans Bay property, where they found another three plastic containers and a metal drum containing a further 24 kilograms of the oil.

The oil can be used to make the crystallised form of methamphetamine, or the drug known as ice.

The trial before Judge Roy Ellis this week heard evidence that Stelios drove to the central coast to do repairs to one of his investment properties.

Alex learnt  of the trip and asked his father to bring back three jerry cans he had been storing in the family’s Phegans Bay property.

Detective Inspector Angelo Memmolo told the court the person who tipped off police about the drugs never mentioned the name Stelios Macris.

Solicitor Kiki Kyriacou, who was acting for barrister John Korn, said  Stelios Macris had acquired his wealth through legal means and hard work.

“The evidence of Inspector Memmolo was that Mr Macris had never been mentioned by name, nor description by the source of the information to police,” Mr Kyriacou said.

“Mr Macris has never been mentioned to be involved in any way shape or form in the drug trade, nor any businesses as alleged against his sons,” he said.

Judge Ellis said there was not sufficient evidence to prove the accused knew the contents of the containers were illegal.

He found him not guilty of all four charges relating to the commercial supply of a prohibited drug.

At the time of the haul, Detective Superintendent Deb Wallace said the operation had a huge impact on a criminal network.

“We would allege that when you take 50 kilograms of ice, technically, off the street, it has a huge dent in any criminal organisation,” she said. “And we would suggest that no one operates alone in these matters.”

 

 

 

http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/nsw/son-uses-father-as-unsuspecting-drug-mule-to-cart-13m-meth-oil-20140510-zr8pq.html

 

 

Kevin Shepard moved into Room 232 at Knights Inn in Lafayettee weeks ago with his fiancee and 3-year-old child to escape a house contaminated with mold. On Friday, the family learned that their temporary refuge might be even more hazardous.

It had been used to manufacture methamphetamine.

More than two years ago, the Tippecanoe County Health Department declared Room 232 unfit for human occupancy and ordered the motel’s managers to hire a state-certified company to test contamination levels. But Ron Noles, the county health department’s chief environmentalist, said he’s received no documentation that the managers ever complied with the order.

methsigns

“I think he tried to skirt the law, save a buck,” Noles said, adding that he wields no power to fine or cite noncompliant property owners.

Shepard said he had no idea the room had been used as a meth lab until the Journal & Courier knocked on his door Friday afternoon.

“They shouldn’t have given us this room until it was totally inspected,” he said, noting that management didn’t mention meth when they offered him a new room Friday. They simply cited a need to remodel the room.

Deven Patel, manager of the motel, declined to comment about the situation, but Noles said Patel told him Friday afternoon that he had hired a meth-remediation company to test contamination levels in the room.

Recent busts

The lesson of this and other episodes is clear: The next time you check into an inexpensive motel, you might just want to sniff around under the bed. The guests who stayed in the room before you might have been cooking up a batch of methamphetamine.

Police report that they busted two such motel-room meth operations in Greater Lafayette in recent weeks. They removed meth-making chemicals from a room at Prestige Inn in West Lafayete on April 30, then dismantled an active meth lab in a room at Economy Inn in Lafayette on May 1.

Authorities posted bright red and yellow signs outside Room 78 at Economy Inn, warning the public that the room is “unfit for human habitation” and will remain so until cleaned and deemed safe by a state-certified meth-remediation team.

Manufacturing methamphetamine in a motel room is a serious felony in Indiana, but those convicted of the crime aren’t the only ones who pay.

Property owners, who are among the many victims cooking meth creates, are stuck at times shouldering the burden of expensive cleanup efforts. Damages are even costlier when lost room revenue and a tarnished public image are factored in.

Ryan Weaver, owner of Rossville-based Bio Recovery Specialists, said his line of business — cleaning up former meth labs — has been particularly “lucrative” lately. That has him thinking, he said, that some motel guests who cook meth are getting away with it and leaving safety hazards behind when they check out.

“The sad thing is, we will probably see more and more people exposed to that situation where they have stayed in a hotel room that has been used as a drug lab,” Weaver said.

The incident last month was not the first time meth-making materials were found at Prestige Inn. A previous incident was reported to the Tippecanoe County Health Department in November 2012. In that case, an operational meth lab was found.

Jagdish Patel, who serves as general manager for both Prestige Inn and Economy Inn, declined to comment on how the costs of testing and remediation are affecting his business.

A total of five motel room meth busts have been reported at Tippecanoe County motels since December 2011.

Dozens of active meth labs and chemical dump sites have been reported during that time in houses, apartments, garages, vehicles, alleys, lots and roadsides, according to health department data.

MOTELS AFFECTED
Economy Inn, Room 78: active lab May 1, 2014
Prestige Inn,chemicals seized April 30, 2014
Prestige Inn, Room 118: active lab Nov. 27, 2012
Knights Inn, Room 232: active lab April 23, 2012
Motel Six, Room 220: active lab Dec. 6, 2011

Health concerns

Law enforcement agencies are required by Indiana law to report meth labs to state police, the criminal justice institute and local fire and health departments, but Tippecanoe County Health Department environmentalist Craig Rich said police probably aren’t catching 100 percent of meth labs, meaning some contaminated spaces may not be getting cleaned up.

“That might be something that’s slipping through the cracks,” he said.

Respiratory problems rank highest on the list of health concerns precipitated by living spaces contaminated with meth-making byproducts, Rich said. Depending on how a structure is built, he added, those concerns could extend well beyond the immediate area where the lab was located.

“When you’re dealing with a hotel, where the heating and cooling units are all interconnected, that can spread to other rooms,” he said.

Noles said any suspicion that a place may have been contaminated by a meth lab should be reported to local authorities or the Indiana State Police drug task force. There’s an online form to report suspected meth activity directly to the state.

Noles said a strong chemical odor is among the telltale signs of a meth lab.

Weaver described the smell as “pungent” or “biting.” It doesn’t take long, he said, for the airborne chemicals to inflict severely itchy eyes or a headache.

Trooper Wes Ennis, a member of ISP’s meth suppression team, said the odor is difficult to describe, but distinct.

“Just like marijuana smells like marijuana, meth chemicals smell like meth chemicals,” he said.

In addition to the chemical odor, authorities warn that the presence of meth-making materials should also raise a red flag. Cold packs with ammonia nitrate, battery packs with lithium strips, pseudoephedrine that often comes in blister packs, tubing, glass jars — these are all used to manufacture the stimulant, Weaver said.

Ennis said if something looks suspicious, people should report it. He’d rather that an officer determines a complaint to be unfounded than let dangerous contaminants go unchecked.

Chemicals found

Ennis said he was among those who responded to remove dangerous materials from Prestige Inn.

“They had solvent in jars that there was still meth suspended in,” he said. “So we still had the product and also a solvent, a chemical, on the scene.”

West Lafayette police officers found about four grams of a white powdery substance that field-tested positive for meth, plus several items of paraphernalia and two Mason jars with wet white residue in the Prestige room, according to a probable cause affidavit filed by the Tippecanoe County Prosecutor’s Office. They took two occupants into custody and removed a sleeping 2-year-old from the room.

Because the defendants had apparently not used their room to cook new product, Ennis said, the threat level was fairly low, making cleanup relatively easy.

Economy Inn wasn’t so lucky.

Lafayette officers arrived at the motel to serve a warrant when they smelled a strong odor commonly associated with meth-making. They entered a room and discovered meth “in the process of being manufactured,” according to a press release. The man who rented the room and two guests were arrested.

Reporting protocol

When an active lab is discovered in a densely populated area such as a motel, Ennis said, officers will evacuate adjoining rooms as well until they are deemed safe. He said chemicals used to manufacture the stimulant drug pose a fire hazard and are also physically dangerous, burning flesh when touched or inhaled.

“It will do internal damage to your lungs, esophagus, everything else,” he said.

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management prohibits the owner of a contaminated structure from occupying it or “transferring any interest in the property to another person,” unless and until the building is decontaminated or demolished.

Ennis said property owners are responsible for costly testing and remediation and that demolition is, in some cases, the most cost-effective option.

The ISP meth suppression team is tasked with removing immediate hazards from a freshly discovered meth lab, but it’s up to county health department officials, Ennis said, to determine if a structure is habitable again.

The owner of a contaminated property must then seek out an IDEM-approved inspector — such as Weaver or Zac Osborn, who owns Indiana State Decontamination — to test contamination levels before and after cleanup.

Osborn said most of the jobs landed by his company have fallen in the $4,000-$6,000 range. One outlier cost more than $10,000.

Weaver said costs for his company’s services vary between $3,000-$10,000 depending on the square footage involved, the extent of contamination and the materials contaminated. He said remediation of a carpeted room with bare wood and wallpaper, for instance, would cost more than a similarly sized space with cinder block walls and a cement floor.

When called upon to decontaminate a property, Weaver said, cleaners remove all contents, including furniture, clothing, electronics, carpeting and ceiling tiles. They then vacuum the walls and spray all surfaces with a military-grade chemical that boils the meth out of the surfaces, he said.

“We will be in full hazmat suits,” Weaver said. Face respirators and double gloves protect his employees from the chemicals.

Two days later, he said, the team will conduct a post-test of their work and send the results to the state.

 

Once the county health department gets test results, Rich said, the property can be released for use. Getting a meth lab site cleaned and securing health department approval can go “fairly quickly,” he added, noting that motel owners could have their rooms back in service in three to four months.

Indiana law requires courts to order convicted meth manufacturers to pay for environmental cleanup costs “incurred by a law enforcement agency or other person as a result of the offense.”

Noles, the county environmental officer, said Room 232 was to be tested for meth lab contamination on Saturday. Results should be back within a few days. Meanwhile, he advised the family moving out of Room 232 to have medical checkups as a precaution.

“He still violated the law and will be responsible for any medical issues,” Noles said of the motel’s owner. Noles said he will speak with the county attorney this week to see if further action can taken as a result of the motel’s noncompliance with a health department order.

FIle video: Here’s a glimpse into how Indiana State Police meth suppression unit disassembles a used lab.

BY THE NUMBERS

 

  • Meth busts reported from 2009 to 2014 to the Tippecanoe County Health Department.
  • 87 Total occurrences
  • 57 Total active labs
  • 5 Motel rooms
  • 4 Active labs in motel rooms
  • $4,000-$6,000 Possible cost of remediating a room where meth has been manufactured

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.jconline.com/story/news/crime/2014/05/10/motel-owners-victims-meth-making-guests/8937859/

 

PRYOR, OKMethamphetamine addiction is common in Oklahoma. Although it is a long road, recovery is possible.

It feels dark, lonely, depressing. You think you’re different, strange, and that no one is struggling the way you are.

“These negative emotions come rushing to the surface as your high begins to dissipate,” said Lance Lang, founder of Hope is Alive Ministries, a non-profit substance abuse rehabilitation program. “And as soon as you begin to feel these feelings, your mind instantly begins to long for an escape, for something that will make the pain go away.” T

hat begins the search, Lang says, the cycle from one high to finding the next.

“We seek out whatever it may be that we believe will cure our ills and we do whatever it takes to find it, lie, cheat, steal, bribe and manipulate,” said Lang. “We inevitably get what we want, we get high. But the escape we’ve searched for is always temporary, empty, meaningless.”

The addict is again left in that dark place, lonely and depressed, Lang said. This is the cycle of addiction.

“Many turn their heads to the problem, so long as it isn’t affecting them,” said Anita Cantrell, a drug and alcohol counselor in Pryor.

The choice to use methamphetamine, Cantrell said, is largely a demographic one.

Meth is a stimulant, inducing a rush of pleasure by affecting centers in the brain involved with pleasure and sexual activity,” said Cantrell. “People choose meth because it is cheaper and more easily accessible than other drugs.”

Meth is versatile, you can smoke it, snort it, or shoot it, which is another reason people turn to it, according to Cantrell.

“You can also administer it intravenously, and the effects lasts longer than cocaine. People choose meth because once they try it it and feel that intense high, they are continually trying to feel the effects of that first high,” said Cantrell. “Then they become dependent, using it to ‘keep from getting sick’ which is only the avoidance of withdrawal.”

In the throes of addiction, Lang said, many addicts don’t realize the danger.

“For me, I had no idea what I was doing. I didn’t even recognize I was addicted until I woke up one night in severe withdrawals. But even that didn’t wake me up to my situation. I keep chasing my fix all over the state. Meth, pills, crack, you name it I did. But even in the midst of all this craziness I never really considered the danger I was putting myself and my kids in. I was so blinded. I knew one thing, I had to get high and nothing was gonna stop me,” said Lang.

He said everyone around him knew he had a problem, but he couldn’t see it.

“People suffering any kind of addiction often feel they are alone and like they can’t find their way out,” said Cantrell.

“Even during the darkest times, I refused to admit it. I was caught on several occasions and each time I lied my way out. I look back and realize just how sad it must have been to watch as I destroyed my life,” said Lang.

Cantrell said she’s researched methamphetamine as it’s one of the more common drug addictions in the county.

She said the drug can be tracked back to 1887.

“Amphetamines were used in World War II by allied German and Japanese forces to keep pilots alert for extended missions and to keep troops awake and more aggressive during battle,” said Cantrell.

Cantrell said, according to her research, the late 1980s and 1990s saw a resurgence in the availability and the abusers of illicit methamphetamine, particularly crystal meth.

Cantrell thinks shows like “Breaking Bad,” which has a high school chemistry teacher turn to drug manufacturing to pay medical bills, glamorize the issue.

“The show makes manufacturing meth seem both plausible and lucrative,” said Cantrell, adding that the target demographic of the show mirrors the demographic of the meth user, a white male between 19 and 40.

“Meth is one of the hardest drugs to kick. It gives you such a false sense of reality that makes it near impossible to live without. It’s viscous and destroying our state,” said Lang.

In his most recent book, “Hope Changes Everything,” Lang wrote that he started believing the lie that his failures and flaws made him a loser.

“And once I started believing that lie, it began to compound in my mind until I felt buried under a landslide of self-doubt and insecurity. I’ve messed up too much, I would think. There’s no going back now. I’m a failure, I’m a fraud. My dreams are dead,” Lang wrote, saying it’s a familiar feeling for many addicts.

Lang writes of the light at the end of the tunnel as well.

“Don’t stop pushing ahead. Forward motion is good, even if it’s barely perceptible. That is when you can overcome your fears and start to move forward in the rest of your life,” Lang wrote. “You can’t change your past, but you can live in hope for today, and when you do that, you’re taking a stand for the future. Hope begins now.”

 

 

 

 

http://www.pryordailytimes.com/crimescourts/x360424251/Crystal-Culture-part-4-The-light-at-the-end-of-the-tunnel

 

WEST COVINA >> A man believed to be high on bath salts and methamphetamine threatened passers-by with a gas can, doused himself in the flammable liquid and bit a police officer before finally being wrestled into custody by police early Saturday, authorities said.

Juan Carlos Urrutia, 24, of West Covina was arrested in connection with the incident, according to West Covina police officials and Los Angeles County booking records.

The bizarre series of event unfolded shorty after 7 a.m. in the area of West Covina Parkway and Glendora Avenue.

Police received numerous calls of a man — later identified as Urrutia — of about 19 years old walking in the middle of the street with a gasoline can in-hand, “threatening motorists to light them on fire,” West Covina police Lt. Dennis Patton said.

Callers further reported that the man had doused a bush, as well as himself, in gasoline, and had been seen carrying both a lighter and a crowbar, the lieutenant said.

Officers arrived and confronted Urrutia, who was still carrying the gas can, as well as some jumper cables and paper towels that had been soaked in gasoline, Patton said. He appeared highly intoxicated. 

“He disobeyed call commands,” Patton said.

But because the man was soaked in flammable liquid, officer were unable to use a Taser to subdue Urrutua for fear of igniting a fire, police said. So police wrestled him into custody.

“It took multiple officers to get this guy into custody,” Patton said.

Urrutia bit an officer in the arm during the struggle, breaking the skin and causing a “significant injury,” Patton said. The officer was treated and released at a hospital.

The suspect told officials that he had consumed bath salts and methamphetamine, he said. He was taken to a hospital for examination.

Bath salts is a term used to describe a family of synthetic stimulants often sold as items such as bath salt, labeled not for human consumption.

After being examined at a hospital, Urrutia was booked on suspicion of assault with a deadly weapon on a police officer, resisting arrest and being under the influence of drugs, police said.

According to county booking records, Urrutia was being held in lieu of $50,000 bail pending his arraignment, scheduled Tuesday in West Covina Superior Court.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.sgvtribune.com/general-news/20140510/police-suspect-on-rampage-in-west-covina-was-high-on-meth-bath-salts