CONWAY, SC (WMBF) – Police advised three people to seek medical treatment after they touched material from an apparent meth lab that was found in a Conway driveway.

 

Horry County Police responded to the 4400 block of the Pee Dee Highway Thursday afternoon after a suspicious item was reported in a driveway, according to a police report.

An officer arrived on scene to find a soda bottle filled with an unknown greenish material. The woman who reported the item said she tossed the bottle earlier, but after seeing what she thought was a bullet nearby, she called police, believing it may be a bomb.

The officer noticed a battery nearby that had been cut open.

The woman who reported the suspicious bottle said she touched it, and after smelling it, became sick, the report states. Two others also said they touched it. Police advised all three people to get medical treatment.

A HCPD detective took over the investigation, and the ‘one pot’ or ‘shake and bake’-style meth lab was submitted to a cleanup crew for destruction, the report states.

 

 

 

 

http://www.wmbfnews.com/story/23668785/shake-and-bake-meth-lab-found-on-driveway-in-Conway

 

Three men are in jail following two separate routine traffic stops Friday in Grant Parish.

Grant Parish sheriff’s deputies pulled over a vehicle for no brake lights and, after a closer look inside the car, found ingredients used in methamphetamine manufacturing, authorities reported. Detectives secured a search warrant for 3261 Gray’s Creek Road in Dry Prong, where they discovered crystal meth and other components of the drug.

Matthew Gross, 22, of 3261 Gray’s Creek Road, was arrested and charged with creation or operation or a clandestine lab, possession of CDS III, possession of drug paraphernalia and a fugitive warrant from Rapides Parish. His bond is set at $31,000.

Matthew Gross

Matthew Gross 

Ricky Brown, 28, of 3261 Gray’s Creek Road, was arrested and charged with creation or operation of a clandestine lab, possession of CDS II, possession of drug paraphernalia, driving under suspension, brake lights required and two fugitive warrants. His bond is set at $32,000.

Ricky Brown

Ricky Brown

In a separate incident, 26-year-old William Watkins of 182 Jack Road in Winnfield was arrested and charged with possession of crystal methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia after Grant Parish Cpl. Clay Nugent and Deputy Mike Miller stopped him for a traffic violation.

The law enforcement officers reported finding methamphetamine and a syringe hidden in the vehicle. Watkins was booked into the Grant Parish Detention Center, and his bond was set at $6,000.

http://www.thetowntalk.com/article/20131012/NEWS01/131011035/Traffic-stops-lead-drug-arrests-Grant-Parish

MARQUETTE – Members of the Upper Peninsula Substance Enforcement Team responded to two methamphetamine-related incidents Wednesday in Marquette County. In one case, a meth dump site was found. In an unrelated case, material used to make meth was found during a traffic stop.

UPSET members, with help from the Michigan State Police Negaunee post, discovered components used to manufacture methamphetamine inside a vehicle during a traffic stop on County Road 496 near County Road CKH in Ely Township Wednesday.

According to a news release from UPSET, two suspects, a 29-year-old female and 20-year-old male, were arrested at the scene for possession of methamphetamine components and conspiracy to manufacture methamphetamine. The male suspect was also arrested on two outstanding warrants out of Delta County.

UPSET-certified meth responders separated all the components and placed them in approved containers for disposal. The Marquette County Sheriff’s Department assisted at the scene.

In a separate investigation, UPSET members were contacted Wednesday by the Marquette County Sheriff’s Department to respond to a methamphetamine dump site in Marquette Township, west of the Target store.

According to UPSET, a teacher from North Star Academy was walking on the trail with seventh- and eighth-grade students when they came upon a smoldering pile of debris on the trail, which turned out to be meth lab components.

The components were cleaned up by UPSET-certified meth responders and placed in approved containers for disposal. No suspects have been identified at this time.

 

 

 

 

http://www.dailypress.net/page/content.detail/id/544324/UPSET-tackles-meth-issues.html

 

CALCASIEU PARISH, LA (KPLC) – A Mississippi law has helped the number of methamphetamine labs decrease, according to law enforcement officials there.

The decrease of almost 90 percent is the result of a 2010 law banning the over-the-counter sale of pseudoephedrine.<em>Thursday, October 10, 2013 9:50 PM EST</em&amp

Kim Rogers, of Rodgers Pharmacy in Petal, Miss., said they were seeing a lot of problems so they refused to sell to certain people.

“We’d have carloads of people pull up in here without a state driver’s license,” said Rodgers. “And they all had sinus issues.”

Here in Louisiana, the meth industry is growing fast.

Calcasieu Parish District Attorney John DeRosier said his solution is simple.

“Something’s got to be done to limit the availability of large quantities of pseudoephedrine from people who take it and make meth with it,” said DeRosier.

DeRosier’s main concern is for those people who use over-the-counter pseudoephedrine products responsibly.

“It’s going to be an inconvenience,” said DeRosier. “The question is how far or how much do we inconvenience people who are solid, legitimate, good citizens and use it wisely.”

Diana Drake, executive director of the New Beginnings Rehabilitation Center in Moss Bluff, said admissions for patients seeking treatment caused by meth has increased by 30 percent.

She said the state needs to limit the amounts of how much you can buy because she believes it’s only going to get worse.

DeRosier said that although it may take time, the state is making progress.

“We’ve managed now to get a fairly respectable handle on that, although any death by overdose is too many,” said DeRosier.

 

 

 

http://www.nwfdailynews.com/local/investigators-notice-ammonia-odor-thick-cloud-1.216948?page=0

 

FORT WALTON BEACH — Okaloosa County sheriff’s investigators discovered a meth lab Thursday in a home on Barks Drive after responding to a tip from the probation department.

Jerome Traynor Stone and Tammie Tonalisa Clanahan, both 50, were charged with manufacturing methamphetamine, according to the Sheriff’s Office. Stone also was charged with possessing a controlled substance without a prescription and possession of drug equipment.

 

meth lab

Left, Jerome Traynor Stone; right, Tammie Tonalisa Clanahan

 

 

 

When deputies knocked on the door at 148 Barks Drive, Stone answered. After being read his rights, he agreed to speak with investigators.

They stepped inside and immediately noticed a “strong ammonia odor” and a “thick cloud,” which are common indicators of a clandestine meth lab, according to Stone’s arrest report.

When Stone was asked if there was a meth lab in the home, he hesitated before saying no, the report said.

Officials went back outside, where Stone “freely admitted” to cooking meth in the house earlier Thursday. His cooking was in the final stage, which accounted for the odor and cloud. Stone also “had a problem,” referring to his addiction to methamphetamine.

Stone told deputies that Clanahan, his live-in girlfriend, regularly purchased boxes of cold medicine containing pseudoephedrine so he could make meth, which they both use, the report said.

While a search warrant of the home was being executed, Clanahan called the Sheriffs’ Office dispatch and asked if she could return to the house.

She provided a sworn statement that she purchased pseudoamphetamine regularly so her boyfriend could manufacture meth.

 

 

 

 

http://www.nwfdailynews.com/local/investigators-notice-ammonia-odor-thick-cloud-1.216948?page=0

 

BRISTOL, Tenn.  —  Authorities have released the name of a Bristol man who was fatally shot Friday night by Sullivan County law enforcement officers investigating a report of an active methamphetamine lab.

The suspect was identified as Kenneth Ray Clark, 47, Windor Avenue, Bristol, Tenn.

According to the Sullivan County Sheriff’s Office, Clark was wanted on warrants for a probation violation. Clark also reportedly had outstanding warrants in Bristol, Va.

 

——

BRISTOL, Tenn.  —  An unidentified man was shot and killed Friday evening after he allegedly tried to run over law enforcement officers investigating an active methamphetamine lab.

The identity of the deceased was being withheld Friday night pending notification of the man’s relatives.

According to Sullivan County Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman Leslie Earhart, the incident occurred at a residence located on Bay Street in Bristol, Tenn., around 7:20 p.m.

Earhart said officers with the Sullivan County Sheriff’s Office Vice Unit  —  along with several deputies and members of the 1st Judicial Drug Task Force and Tennessee Methamphetamine Task Force  —  were dispatched to the home as part of an ongoing investigation after receiving a information that a suspect with outstanding warrants was there.

Authorities were also told that an active meth lab was located in a shed behind the residence.

Upon arriving at the scene, Earhart said officers made contact with the suspect after finding him in a vehicle at the residence. The suspect reportedly refused to exit the vehicle, and in an attempt to flee the scene, tried to run over at least two officers, Earhart said.

As a result, officers opened fire on the vehicle, apparently striking the suspect.

According to Earhart, despite being shot, the suspect managed to drive to Randolph Street, which is located approximately a mile away in Bristol, Va.

After being found, the unidentified man was transported to Bristol Regional Medical Center and pronounced dead.

As with any officer-involved shooting, Earhart said the incident under investigation by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation.

Earhart said officers were still at the Bay Street residence late Friday night after locating an active meth lab in the shed behind the home.

 

 

 

 

http://www.timesnews.net/article/9068533/officers-fatally-shoot-man-at-scene-of-allged-meth-lab-in-Bristol

 

Henderson County authorities say they have charged nearly 30 people in a “large scale methamphetamine distribution and conspiracy investigation.”

The investigations began in June of 2012, according to a news release from the Henderson County Sheriff’s Office.

Authorities say 29 people have been indicted. Investigators seized over $42,000 in cash, four weapons, two vehicles, 32 grams of cocaine, 5.74 pounds of methamphetamine and 84 grams of marijuana.

“The drugs seized have a street value in excess of $265,000,” according to the release.

The following is a list of those arrested:

* Amanda Lee Pressley, 30, of Hendersonville, trafficking methamphetamine and maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of sale and delivery of methamphetamine. Her bond was set at $16,000.

* Margaret Rosemary Gibbs, 50, of Hendersonville was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine and maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of sale and delivery of methamphetamine. Her bond was set at $16,000.

* Laura Kathleen Robinson, 44, of Hendersonville, was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine. Her bond was set at $8,000.

* Christopher Thomas Pressley, 26, of Etowah, was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine. His bond was set at $10,000.

* Clyde Coleman Forrest, 56, of Zirconia, was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine and maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of sale and delivery of methamphetamine. His bond was set at $8,000.

* Rhonda Allison Forrest, age 52, Zirconia, was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine and maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of sale and delivery of methamphetamine. Her bond was set at $15,000.

* Thomas Barry Heatherly, 48, of Hendersonville, was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine. His bond was set at $8,000.

* Marcos José Hernandaz, 32, of Hendersonville, was charged with conspiracy to sell and deliver methamphetamine. His bond was set at $30,000.

* David Benjamin Nelson, 28, of Zirconia, was charged with conspiracy to sell and deliver methamphetamine, sale of methamphetamine, possession with intent to manufacture, sale and deliver methamphetamine, maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of sale and delivery of methamphetamine, maintain a vehicle for the purpose of sale and delivery of methamphetamine and failure to appear on driving while impaired. His bond was set at $60,500.

* Tina Louise Stamey, 43, of Clyde, was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine. Her bond was set at $8,000.

* Felipe Lee Villafranca, 24, of Hendersonville, was charged with contempt of court, failure to appear on the possession of stolen property. His bond was set at $1000. William Bradley Keller, 25, of Hendersonville, was charged with order for arrest, contempt of court and his bond was set at $300.

* Araceli Sanchez-Jaramillo, 23, of Hendersonville, was charged with felony possession of schedule II cocaine, maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of sale and delivery, and possession of drug paraphernalia. Her bond was set at $12,500. José Gomez-Sanchez, 22, of Hendersonville was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine. His bond was set at $10,000.

* Juan Carlos Cruz-Magna, 31, of Hendersonville, was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine, conspiracy to sell methamphetamine. His bond was set at $60,000.

* Francisco Gomez-Jaramillo, 28, of Hendersonville was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine, trafficking methamphetamine and maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of sale and delivery of methamphetamine. His bond was set at $30,000.

* Juan Miquel Vasquez-Ortiz, 24, of Hendersonville, was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine, trafficking methamphetamine and conspiracy to sell methamphetamine. His bond was set at $105,000.

* Raul Aceves-Rizo, 39, of Fletcher, was charged with trafficking methamphetamine and maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of sale and delivery of methamphetamine. His bond was set at $60,000.

* Jorge Piquet-Terron, 20, of Zirconia, was charged with felony possession of marijuana, conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine, felony maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of sale and delivery of a controlled substance and trafficking methamphetamine. His bond was set at $60,000.

* Heather Lynn Sam’s, 23, of Hendersonville, was indicted for possession with intent to sell and deliver methamphetamine. She is currently in the custody of the North Carolina Department of Corrections.

* Raymond Ortiz Florez Jr., 23, of Hendersonville, was charged with possession with intent to sell methamphetamine, conspiracy to sell methamphetamine, and maintaining a vehicle for the purpose of the sale of methamphetamine. His bond was set at $16,000.

* Sidney Thomas Nalley, 56, of Hendersonville, was charged with possession with intent to sell and deliver methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia conspiracy to sell methamphetamine and maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of selling delivery of methamphetamine. His bond was set at $9,500.

* Richard Scott Justice, 44, of Flat Rock, was charged with conspiracy to sell methamphetamine. His bond was set at $1,600.

Officials say the following people were indicted but have not yet been arrested:

* Raul Robles Caravajal, 43, of Zirconia, was indicted on trafficking methamphetamine conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine and maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of sale and delivery of methamphetamine.

* Lorin Viola Rutherford, 33, of Hendersonville, was indicted on possession with intent to sell and deliver methamphetamine.

* Jason Christopher Dills, 39, of Hendersonville, was indicted on possession with intent to sell and deliver methamphetamine.

* Kevin Nicholas Schonderwoerd, 43, of Hendersonville, was indicted on conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine.

* José Alfredo Dominguez Aguilar, 23, of Hendersonville was indicted on conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine.

Anyone with information about the whereabouts of any of these individuals, should contact the Henderson County Sheriff’s Office at 697-4911.

http://www.citizen-times.com/article/20131011/NEWS/131011013/30-arrested-meth-charges-Henderson-County?nclick_check=1

29 Indicted In Major Local Methamphetamine Investigation

 

 

Members of the Henderson County Sheriff’s Office, Hendersonville Police Department, and the State Bureau of Investigation have begun to arrest twenty-nine (29) recently indicted individuals from a large scale methamphetamine distribution and conspiracy investigation. The investigations began in June 2012 and  to date have resulted in the seizure of over $42,000 in cash, four weapons, two automobiles, 32 grams of cocaine,  2603.3 grams (5.74 lbs) of methamphetamine and 84 grams of marijuana. The drugs seized have a street value in excess of $265,000.

The arrests, along with true bills of indictment issued by a Henderson County Grand Jury on September 30 targeted several high-level distributors of methamphetamine in the Henderson County area.

crystal meth photo: Crystal-Meth Crystal-Meth.jpg

To date twenty-four (24) of the  twenty-nine (29) persons indicted or having warrants issued against them have been arrested. Those arrested are:

(1)    Amanda Lee Pressley, age 30, of Hendersonville for trafficking methamphetamine and maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of sale and delivery of methamphetamine. Her bond was set at $16,000.

(2)    Margaret Rosemary Gibbs, age 50 of Hendersonville was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine and maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of sale and delivery of methamphetamine. Her bond was set at $16,000.

(3)    Laura Kathleen Robinson, age 44, of Hendersonville was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine. Her bond was set at $8000.

(4)    Christopher Thomas Pressley, age 26, of Etowah was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine. His bond was set at $10,000.

(5)    Clyde Coleman Forrest, age 56, of Zirconia was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine and maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of sale and delivery of methamphetamine. His bond was set at $8000.

(6)    Rhonda Allison Forrest, age 52, Zirconia was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine and maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of sale and delivery of methamphetamine. Her bond was set at $15,000.

(7)    Thomas Barry Heatherly, age 48, of Hendersonville was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine. His bond was set at $8000.

(8)    Marcos José Hernandaz, age 32, of Hendersonville was charged with conspiracy to sell and deliver methamphetamine. His bond was set at $30,000.

(9)    David Benjamin Nelson, age 28, of Zirconia was charged with conspiracy to sell and deliver methamphetamine, sale of methamphetamine, possession with intent to manufacture, sale and deliver methamphetamine, maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of sale and delivery of methamphetamine, maintain a vehicle for the purpose of sale and delivery of methamphetamine and failure to appear on driving while impaired.  His bond was set at $60,500.

(10)Tina Louise Stamey, age 43, of Clyde was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine. Her bond was set at $8000.

(11)Felipe Lee Villafranca , age 24, of Hendersonville was charged with contempt of court, failure to appear on the possession of stolen property. His bond was set at $1000.

(12)William Bradley Keller, age 25, of Hendersonville was charged with order for arrest, contempt of court and his bond was set at $300.

(13)Araceli Sanchez-Jaramillo, age 23, of Hendersonville was charged with felony possession of Schedule II cocaine, maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of sale and delivery, and possession of drug paraphernalia. Her bond was set at $12,500.

(14)José Gomez-Sanchez, age 22, of Hendersonville was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine. His bond was set at $10,000.

(15)Juan Carlos Cruz-Magna , age 31, of Hendersonville was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine, conspiracy to sell methamphetamine. His bond was set at $60,000.

(16)Francisco Gomez-Jaramillo, age 28, of Hendersonville was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine, trafficking methamphetamine and maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of sale and delivery of methamphetamine. His bond was set at $30,000.

(17)Juan Miquel Vasquez-Ortiz , age 24, of Hendersonville was charged with conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine, trafficking methamphetamine and conspiracy to sell methamphetamine. His bond was set at $105,000.

(18)Raul Aceves-Rizo, age 39, of Fletcher was charged with trafficking methamphetamine and maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of sale and delivery of methamphetamine. His bond was set at $60,000.

(19)Jorge Piquet-Terron, age 20 of Zirconia was charged with felony possession of marijuana, conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine, felony maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of sale and delivery of a controlled substance and trafficking methamphetamine. His bond was set at $60,000.

(20)Heather Lynn Sam’s age 23, of Hendersonville was indicted for possession with intent to sell and deliver methamphetamine. She is currently in the custody of the North Carolina Department of Corrections.

(21)Raymond Ortiz Florez Jr, age 23 of Hendersonville  was charged with possession with intent to sell methamphetamine, conspiracy to sell methamphetamine, and maintaining a vehicle for the purpose of the sale of methamphetamine. His bond was set at $16,000.

(22)Sidney Thomas Nalley, age 56  , of Hendersonville was charged with possession with intent to sell and deliver methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia conspiracy to sell methamphetamine and maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of selling delivery of methamphetamine. His bond was set at $9500.

(23)Richard Scott Justice age 44, of Flat Rock was charged with conspiracy to sell methamphetamine. His bond was set at $1600.

The following persons have been indicted and have yet to be arrested. If anyone knows the whereabouts of any of these individuals, please contact the Henderson County Sheriff’s Office at 828-697-4911.

(1)    Raul Robles Caravajal , age 43, of zirconia is indicted on trafficking methamphetamine conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine and maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of sale and delivery of methamphetamine.

(2)    Lorin Viola Rutherford, age 33, of Hendersonville is indicted on possession with intent to sell and deliver methamphetamine.

(3)    Jason Christopher Dills , age 39, of Hendersonville is indicted on possession with intent to sell and deliver  methamphetamine.

(4)    Kevin Nicholas Schonderwoerd age 43, of Hendersonville is indicted on conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine.

(5)    José Alfredo Dominguez Aguilar , age 23, of Hendersonville is indicted on conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine.

http://www.whkp.com/news/7450-29-indicted-in-major-local-meth-investigation.html

On Sunday evening, a police officer arrested a bicyclist near Pueblo and Stadium avenues in Napa following a traffic stop, police said.

Jaime Francisco Soto-Ferreyra, 22, of Napa, was on probation and wanted on a warrant, police said. He allegedly had beer, a violation of the terms of his probation, and a small amount of suspected methamphetamine in his wallet, police said.

He was booked into the Napa County jail on the warrant and on suspicion of transportation of a controlled substance, and a probation violation, police said. He was charged Tuesday in Napa County Superior Court with possession of a controlled substance.

 

 

 

http://napavalleyregister.com/news/local/bicyclist-arrested-with-suspected-methamphetamine/article_297a3010-32a0-11e3-aae5-0019bb2963f4.html

 

The multimillion-dollar superlab of “Breaking Bad” may be gone, but thousands of meth labs around the country remain. The midwestern states tend to see the most incidents involving meth labs, and Missouri outranks all others with 1,825 busts and seizures in 2012, according to a Government Accountability Office analysis of Drug Enforcement Administration data.

Moreover, an increasingly popular crude cooking method known as “shake and bake” has put meth production in addicts’ hands, eliminating the need for an RV or even chemistry know-how.

.

 

It takes about 15 minutes to “shake and bake” a batch of meth in a plastic bottle using ingredients you may already have lying around the house. Sometimes the bottle explodes, badly burning the often uninsured meth cook and anyone else in the line of fire.

Meth use cost the U.S. economy around $23.4 billion in 2005, according to a RAND Corporation study. While incidents involving meth labs have tapered somewhat in recent years, thanks to the rise of “shake and bake” hospitals have noticed an uptick in meth burn cases. It costs around $230,000 to treat a meth lab burn victim, Mother Jones reported. The most common age of these victims: under 4 years old.

Oregon and Mississippi have figured out how to curb these accidents by making the key meth ingredient pseudoephedrine prescription-only. Other states keep the common cold medicine behind the counter under a 2006 federal law, but when Oregon and Mississippi implemented prescription legislation, meth lab incidents immediately plummeted. Dozens of other states have tried to follow their lead, but the pharmaceutical industry isn’t having it.

Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) wanted to make Oregon’s success story a national reality, announcing legislation in 2010 for federal prescription regulation of pseudoephedrine. But according to Mother Jones, he never introduced the bill in Congress, in part because of “heavy industry spending.”

 

 

 

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/07/meth-states_n_4057372.html

 

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Two years ago in Mississippi, lawmakers passed a bill that required a prescription for a cold medicine that’s also used to make methamphetamine. The result: Meth lab busts went down.

In Arkansas, pharmacists are now required to counsel customers before they can buy cold medications containing pseudoephedrine. Meth lab numbers dropped.

In Kentucky, a new law reduced the number of boxes of pseudoephedrine people can buy each year. Meth lab seizures declined there, too.

On Tuesday, the vice president of the National Narcotic Officers’ Association told a Kanawha County substance-abuse task force that several states are taking steps to reduce the scourge of meth labs.

“Pseudoephedrine access, uncontrolled, means more meth labs,” said Sgt. Jason Grellner, who also heads the Franklin County, Mo., Narcotics Enforcement Unit.

The 15-member Kanawha task force is examining ways to reduce the number of meth labs. Law enforcement agencies have seized 373 labs statewide this year, a record-setting number. In Kanawha County alone, officers have busted more than 100 of the clandestine labs since January.

U.S. pseudoephedrine imports doubled between 2005 and 2010, and not because Americans were suffering from more head colds and allergies, Grellner said. Instead, criminals use the medication — known under brand names such as Sudafed and Claritin-D — to cook meth.

“This country is importing gross amounts of pseudoephedrine for meth labs,” Grellner said.

In Missouri, some cities and counties have adopted ordinances that require people to get a doctor’s prescription for pseudoephedrine products. In those communities, sales of the cold and allergy medication have dropped 96 percent, Grellner said.

In Arkansas, large pharmacies, such as Walmart, Walgreens and CVS, established store polices to make pseudoephedrine prescription-only, after the state passed a law that requires a pharmacist’s consultation to buy the medication. The larger pharmacies sell hundreds of boxes of pseudoephedrine a month.

“It was hard for the large stores to conform with the law and meet the consultation requirement,” Grellner said, “so they now require a prescription.”

He said two pseudoephedrine products — Nexafed and Zephrex-D — hold great promise because they can’t easily be converted to meth.

Health advocates and law enforcement groups have suggested that states allow stores to sell those products over the counter, while requiring a prescription for standard pseudoephedrine tablets that are easily cooked into meth. However, Carlos Gutierrez, who sits on the task force and works for the Consumer Healthcare Products Association, said his trade group would oppose having one set of rules for two tamper-resistant pseudoephedrine products and a prescription requirement for 15 or more other brands.

“You create a government-sponsored monopoly,” said Gutierrez, whose group represents companies that manufacture over-the-counter drugs.

Also Tuesday, Gulfport, Miss., Mayor Billy Hewes told task force members that Mississippi’s meth lab numbers dropped significantly after the state started requiring a prescription for pseudoephedrine. The number of meth lab seizures declined from a high of 698 in 2010 — before the law took effect — to 253 last year, he said.

Few pharmacists or customers have complained about the prescription-only requirement, he said.

“There wasn’t a lot of pushback,” Hewes said. “It was the right thing to do. We were able to immediately show a statistical change.”

Gutierrez said surveys show that most Americans vehemently oppose requiring a prescription for pseudoephedrine. “It’s such an unpopular policy with the general public,” he said.

In West Virginia, lawmakers twice introduced legislation — in 2011 and 2012 — to make pseudoephedrine prescription-only, but legislators rejected those bills after Gutierrez’s group lobbied against the proposals.

The task force, which also is examining prescription pain-pill abuse, plans to report its findings and recommendations to the Kanawha County Commission in late November.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.wvgazette.com/News/201310080246?page=2

 

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Pharmacies at Walmart, Rite Aid and CVS in West Virginia are selling the largest number of boxes of a cold medication that contains an ingredient that’s also used by criminals to make illegal methamphetamine in clandestine labs, according to a new report.

Last month, the Southridge Walmart in South Charleston reported 1,851 transactions for cold medicines containing pseudoephedrine, a key meth-making ingredient. That was almost double the sales at Walmart’s Summersville store, which reported 960 transactions, the second-highest number in the state.

Six of the 10 pharmacies in West Virginia with the most sales were Walmart stores. Three Rite Aids — two in Charleston and another in Belle — and one CVS also were among the state’s top 10 for pseudoephedrine sales, according to data from an electronic tracking system called NPLEx.

“All of the top ones are the large chains,” said Dr. Dan Foster, who heads a Kanawha County substance-abuse task force that’s studying pseudoephedrine sales and their possible link to a sharp increase in meth labs.

This week, the West Virginia Board of Pharmacy, which supports requiring a prescription for pseudoephedrine, released a list of the 30 stores in West Virginia that sold the most boxes of the nasal decongestant in August. Only Walmart, Rite Aid and CVS pharmacies made the list.

No Target, Walgreen’s or Kroger pharmacies finished among the top 30.

Bridget Lambert, executive director of the West Virginia Retailers Association, said it’s not surprising that Walmart stores would top the list.

“Those are stores that draw the largest customer base,” said Lambert, who sits on the task force. “The Southridge and Summersville Walmarts both draw customers from multiple counties. These figures are exactly what you’d expect.”

Lambert added that Rite Aid and CVS stores also sell large numbers of pseudoephedrine products — known under brand names such as Sudafed, Allegra D and Claritin-D — because people typically go to neighborhood pharmacies when they have colds and allergy symptoms.

“They go to stores in their local communities,” she said.

The report shows that sales can vary significantly, even within the same neighborhood.

For instance, the Kanawha City Rite Aid store reported 926 pseudoephedrine transactions — the third-highest number in West Virginia. A Kanawha City CVS pharmacy just four blocks east reported 303 transactions in August.

Rite Aid spokeswoman Ashley Flower said Wednesday that the company uses the NPLEx tracking system to monitor and record sales of all products that contain pseudoephedrine.

“Rite Aid takes seriously its responsibilities with regard to the sale of products, including those products with pseudoephedrine,” Flower said. “The company has designed and implemented systems to comply with federal and state law regarding sales of PSE and has a training program in place for associates to complete regarding the sale of these products.”

Foster and West Virginia law enforcement officials say there’s a link between pseudoephedrine sales and meth labs.

Four of the state’s top 10 sellers of pseudoephedrine are located in Kanawha County — three Rite Aid stores and the Southridge Walmart, according to the report.

This year, law enforcement agencies in Kanawha County, which has West Virginia’s largest population, have busted 120 meth labs, five times more than in any other county.

Two Wood County Walmart stores — in Vienna and Parkersburg — also finished in the top 10 for pseudoephedrine sales. Wood County has reported 25 meth lab seizures — the second-highest total in the state.

Officers in Nicholas County — where the Summersville Walmart is located — have discovered 10 meth labs since January, according to State Police data.

High pseudoephedrine sales, though, don’t always correlate to large numbers of meth-lab seizures.

The Clarksburg Walmart and the Star City CVS near Morgantown reported the sixth-highest and 10th-highest numbers of pseudoephedrine boxes sold. Harrison County officers have seized three meth labs this year, while Monongalia authorities responded to only one clandestine lab. The Logan Walmart also ranked in the top 10 for pseudoephedrine sales, but Logan County has reported only two meth labs this year.

The Southridge Walmart’s pseudoephedrine sales have tripled since January, according to a previous report limited to Kanawha County store sales.

Foster said Walmart’s 1,851-box total in August should raise a red flag. By comparison, a Tennessee task force recently released a report that listed pseudoephedrine sales in that state. A Walgreen’s in Memphis topped the list with 1,435 boxes sold in August.

“The Southridge Walmart total is just unbelievable,” Foster said. “It’s a real head-scratcher. You have to assume a lot of that [pseudoephedrine] is not being used to treat colds and congestion.”

In response to questions about the pseudoephedrine sales report, Walmart spokeswoman Danit Marquardt said Wednesday that the retail chain is “committed to quality patient care and social responsibility. We work with government officials, law enforcement and others to serve patients who benefit from these products while protecting against their potential misuse.”

West Virginia’s NPLEx report of pseudoephedrine sales counts total transactions — and does not include blocked sales. The electronic system blocks purchases when people try to exceed monthly and yearly limits set by state law. NPLEx has blocked about 4 percent of the West Virginia’s total pseudoephedrine sales this year.

In West Virginia, pharmacies keep pseudoephedrine products behind the counter. Customers must show a photo ID to purchase the decongestant.

West Virginia law enforcement agencies have reported 373 meth lab busts this year, the most in state history.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.wvgazette.com/News/201310090237?page=2

 

ROSEVILLE– When you are talking about a 4 lbs., $100,000 meth bust, Roseville is not the  first city that comes to mind.

“Here in Roseville we usually deal with low-level drug users and low level  dealers,” said Dee Dee Gunther, Public Information Officer for the Roseville  Police Department.

Police think Lionel Reyes, 34, was the man trying to run  hardcore drugs out of the city with the unknowing help of the U.S. Postal  Service.

“It is becoming more common practice to mail meth to other parts of the  country where bigger dealers can get a better price for it,” said Gunther.

The discovery was made when postal workers at the office on Sierra  Gardens noticed something strange.

“There were some anomalies  with the addressing of it and some other things that possibly it contained  illegal drugs,” said Gunther.

Postal employees are trained to profile a package and its sender, looking for  signs that might indicate something is not right. They will also use X-ray  machinery to help determine what is inside.

In this case, it was four pounds of methamphetamine that was to be shipped  from Roseville to Arkansas.

Police arrested Reyes at his home on Woodcreek Oaks Boulevard where they also  found drug packaging material, illegal assault weapons and ammo.

We tried talking to his wife Jaylene Duenas Reyes who is also facing  charges. She declined to comment.

 

 

 

http://fox40.com/2013/10/02/police-mailing-meth-becoming-more-and-more-common/

 

 

The attorney for a female cocaine dealer who checked her son out of high school so he could translate for her on a major cocaine deal in Chattanooga said she is facing “double the time” after agents found meth in an outbuilding at her residence in Conyers, Ga.

Attorney Hannah Stokes said Leticia Gonzalez denies that the meth is hers, saying that several other adults live at the residence.

A sentencing hearing was delayed to allow the government time to bring a witness to court concerning the meth issue.

Ms. Gonzalez had been set to be sentenced along with co-defendants Jaime Soberanis and Marcisco Valdez on Thursday by Judge Curtis Collier. The sentencing was delayed to a later date.

Under a plea agreement from last March, Ms. Gonzalez was facing a sentence of at least 10 years in federal prison.

The three were arrested in September 2012 at the Cracker Barrel in Lookout Valley.

According to an affidavit in the case, Ms. Gonzalez “proclaims to be a high-level cocaine trafficker who has been involved in narcotics trafficking in the Northern District of Georgia for approximately eight years.”

There were several meetings in the Chattanooga area between Ms. Gonzalez and an undercover officer posing as a drug dealer. That culminated in the meeting at the Cracker Barrel.

Authorities said she presented $75,000 in cash for the drug buy. That money was confiscated after agents swooped in and arrested the trio. Also taken were cash sums of $1,200 and $5,000.

 

 

 

 

http://www.chattanoogan.com/2013/10/10/261034/Attorney-Contests-Doubled-Sentence-For.aspx

 

WASHINGTON CITY — A 24-year-old California man was arrested on drug distribution charges after a Utah Highway Patrol Trooper located suspected cocaine and approximately 10 pounds of methamphetamine in his vehicle.

Rodriguez

Rodriguez

 

 

UHP Trooper Chris Terry stopped Russell Rodriguez for a traffic violation at approximately 10 p.m. Tuesday on Interstate 15 near mile post 14.

“I asked if he would come to my patrol car so I could check his information, (and) he consented and came to my car,” Terry wrote in the probable cause statement.

While filling out a citation, Terry reportedly began a conversation with Rodriguez asking about the man’s trip to Utah. According to Terry, Rodriguez claimed he was driving from California to Salt Lake City to visit his mother.

“At first he stated she had leukemia, and then he changed the type of cancer to breast cancer,” Terry wrote.

Rodriguez allegedly told Terry he would be driving to Salt Lake City and staying until Sunday.

“I asked him what part of Salt Lake City he was traveling to, and he stated he didn’t know,” Terry wrote. “(Rodriguez) began singing some song while in my patrol car, and I noticed he was extremely nervous, shaking profusely, his carotid artery was visible, and I could see his heart beating in his chest.”

According to the statement, Cedar City Dispatch told Terry that Rodriguez’s license was suspended, so Terry asked Rodriguez if he could search the vehicle.

“A vehicle search revealed an estimated weight of 10 pounds of methamphetamine in the trunk of the vehicle concealed in food boxes and alcohol boxes,” Terry wrote.

Terry also reportedly found suspected cocaine in a sunglasses compartment in the roof of the car.

Rodriguez was charged with two second-degree felony counts of drug distribution. He was booked into Purgatory Correctional Facility on $30,000 bail.

Rodriguez was scheduled to make his initial appearance in 5th District Court on Thursday afternoon.

 

 

 

 

http://www.thespectrum.com/article/20131010/NEWS01/310100023

 

TEXAS CITY, TX (KTRK) — Eighth graders are accused of having liquid meth in school.  One of the many concerns is whether more young people are experimenting with this form of the drug.

Parents of Blocker Middle School students in Texas City couldn’t believe it when they heard that six students had been caught with methamphetamine.

“That’s not good at all,” said parent Betty White.  “That’s not safe for any of the kids.”

Grandmother Arlene Brown said, “You hear of addicts, but not a child that’s 12 and 13 years old.”

According to a spokesperson for Texas City ISD, someone suspected the six students, all girls, had taken some kind of drug.  They were found with strange, small pieces of paper, wrapped in tinfoil.

“The Galveston County Sheriff’s Department. did a test on small strips of paper, and it tested positive for liquid methamphetamine,” said Texas City ISD spokesperson Melissa Tortorici.

Liquid methamphetamine is typically found in bottles, and has been found being smuggled over the border.  The paper soaked in meth is new to the district.

“Of course, we’re very concerned,” said Tortorici.  “This new liquid meth is turning out to be a new form of drug, and so it’s an opportunity to inform our community.”

The school district will be sending letters informing parents about what happened, and is also hoping to use the incident as a teaching moment for students.

“Drug awareness, bring it back into the school like it used to be,” Brown suggested.  “They’re not talking about it like they used to.”

The Galveston County Sheriff’s Office is still investigating how the girls obtained the drug.   The sheriff says this is the first time his office has seen methamphetamine in this form, in this area.

 

 

 

http://abclocal.go.com/ktrk/story?section=news/local&id=9281686

 

 

McALLEN — Federal agents arrested a Peñitas woman they say tried selling more than 7 pounds of methamphetamine to an undercover agent earlier this week.

On Wednesday morning in McAllen, Sulema Garcia Arellano went before U.S. Magistrate Judge Peter Ormsby, who informed her of her rights and ordered she be held pending a detention hearing next week.

During a sting operation by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, Garcia was arrested late Monday at the H-E-B at 2409 Expressway 83 in Mission, records show.

DEA agents had spoken on the phone with a man known only as Flaco who was looking for a buyer for 10 kilograms — roughly 22 pounds — of crystal methamphetamine, commonly called ice or crystal.

On Oct. 7, one of the agents called Flaco’s number in Mexico and spoke with his partner — a man known only as El Gordo — to set up a meeting for a buy. El Gordo told the agent that a woman named Sulema would meet him at a location and gave him a phone number.

The agent pulled up to the H-E-B and Garcia arrived soon after in a gray 2002 Ford pickup. After Garcia got into the agent’s truck, she pulled out four bundles wrapped in black tape that contained the drug. As soon as the sale was made, other DEA agents moved in to arrest her.

http://www.themonitor.com/news/local/article_aa7e3e24-31f9-11e3-b1ec-001a4bcf6878.html

Federal investigators on Wednesday arrested a man they said attempted to receive a mailed package containing 50 grams of suspected methamphetamine.

A complaint in federal court has charged Thomas Gogue Gamboa Jr with attempted possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine.

According to federal court documents, postal inspectors intercepted a package from Arizona after a drug detection dog alerted to possible drugs inside the package.

Postal Inspector Jedidiah Hutchison searched the package and allegedly found more than 50 grams in total of a “white crystalline substance hidden inside packages of ring pops.”

Field tests indicated that the substance was methamphetamine.

Investigators replaced the drugs with “sham,” with a monitoring device and sprayed the package with a substance called “clue spray.”

The spray, documents state, is visible under black light and is transferred on to the hands of anybody who touches a treated object.

On Wednesday, investigators delivered the package to the Agat Post Office, where Gamboa picked it up.

Investigators watched Gamboa get into a Toyota Corolla and drive toward the man’s residence when they received an alert that the package had been opened.

The car was pulled over and officers detained Gamboa and Johnny P. Agulto, the vehicle’s driver.

When interviewed, Agulto allegedly told officers that Gamboa promised to give the man a gram of ice for taking him to the community center.

No clue spray residue was found on Agulto’s hands, court documents said.

Investigators did say the found residue on Gamboa’s hands. He asked to speak to a lawyer when questioned.

When officers searched Gamboa’s house, they allegedly found a plastic bag with five straws containing alleged methamphetamine. Investigators also said they found two scales, several clear plastic bags, a bag with cut straws, Zig-Zag wrappers and a suspected marijuana cigarette.

 

 

 

 

http://www.guampdn.com/article/20131011/NEWS01/131011005

 

GARY — Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller joined Gary Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson on Thursday to warn those who purchase over-the-counter medicines used to cook meth that they can now be charged with a felony.

The educational campaign stopped at Fagen Pharmacy in downtown Gary, with Lake County Prosecutor Bernie Carter and Grant Monahan, president of the Indiana Retail Council.

Attorney General Greg Zoeller standing with (from left) Lake County Prosecutor Bernie Carter IndianRetail Council president Grant Monahan Gary Mayor

Attorney General Greg Zoeller, standing with (from left) Lake County Prosecutor Bernie Carter, Indiana Retail Council president Grant Monahan and Gary Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson, discusses the new law preventing someone from purchasing ingredients for meth cooks

 

 

The law passed by the Indiana General Assembly makes it a felony for a customer to purchase pseudoephedrine to manufacture methamphetamine, or purchase it for someone else to manufacture, commonly known as “smurfing.”

“When people come in and buy pseudophedrine to sell or give to meth manufacturers, they’re now committing a felony,” Zoeller said. “It’s the same way that you can’t buy tobacco or alcohol for minors. It’s legal for you to have it and use it, but it’s illegal to give it to a meth cook.”

Zoeller and Carter noted that meth use is not as prevalent in Lake County as other regions of the state, but it’s a continuing concern.

“We’re very fortunate to not have a meth problem in Lake County,” Carter said, “but my fellow prosecutors around the state have a serious problem with it. We don’t want people in Lake County to purchase these items and take them to other communities in Indiana.”

Mayor Freeman-Wilson added that the drug can be dangerous for children who live with addicts, as well as for the addicts themselves.

“We’ve seen the impact drug abuse has on the user but also the families,” Mayor Freeman-Wilson said. “Meth is an extremely addictive drug, and can be very devastating to the physiology of those who use it.”

The new law also limits the amount of pseudoephedrine a single person can purchase for a year, Mohanan said. The law limits a customer to buying eight months worth of the drug, enough to deal with seasonal allergies. He added those who need more should talk to their doctor about a prescription.

“It’s important for retailers to sell to those who genuinely need it,” Monahan said, “but we want to do anything we can to prevent people from using these products to make meth.”

Zoeller has traveled throughout the state in a campaign to explain the new law aimed at curbing the production of meth.

“This is your notice,” Zoeller said. “If you’re caught purchasing for meth cooks, you’ll be prosecuted, too.”

 

 

 

http://posttrib.suntimes.com/news/lake/23077187-418/message-to-those-who-supply-meth-cooks-this-is-your-warning.html

 

 

GASTON — For a five-month period in 2010, the small town of Gaston had quickly gained the unwanted reputation as East Central Indiana’s methamphetamine capital.

But with a police department determined to rid the town of the manufacture and distribution of the dangerous and addicting drug, local law enforcement officials found the meth scene eventually shifted to other areas of the county.

A recent raid in Gaston, however, reminded police that meth remains a real and dangerous possibility in the community.

Officers there arrested three residents Friday after finding a “functioning” meth lab — and other materials used in the production and consumption of meth — at a home in the 500 block of North Sycamore Street.

 

Gaston town Marshal Jim Oliver said Friday’s arrests of Katherine Nicole Cooper, 23; Nathan William Pierce, 24, and Thomas Christopher Swift, 24, represented the 24th, 25th and 26th meth-related arrests in Gaston over the last 2½ years.

In a town of about 870 residents, 26 arrests translates to about three percent of its total population. By comparison, that equates to more than 2,000 residents in Muncie, which has a population of about 70,000.

“We’ve got our drugs like everybody else, but you don’t want to think that meth is coming into town,” Oliver said Tuesday. “That’s one thing that we don’t tolerate, is meth.”

Oliver and his staff became inundated with meth-related police work from May to October 2010, when five meth labs were discovered in the town. He said with the help of the Indiana State Police’s Meth Suppression Section, however, law enforcement officials were eventually able to drive most of the meth cooks and addicts out of Gaston.

Since 2011, Oliver said six meth labs have been discovered in Gaston, which, he said, is still six too many.

“It’s a death sentence,” Oliver said of meth. “Everytime you smoke meth, you’re dying.”

Accordingly, local law enforcement and county prosecutor officials have taken a zero-tolerance stance against meth. An ISP release in late August indicated Delaware County had “the dubious distinction” of ranking second in meth labs discovered and dismantled in 2013.

Delaware County’s 64 meth labs trailed state leader Vanderburgh County’s 65 labs. Since that time, several more labs have been discovered locally.

Not surprisingly, Oliver said news of Friday’s meth bust spread quickly in Gaston.

“After the arrests were made, I went up to our local restaurant, and they already knew who was arrested, and what for,” he said. “Everyone in the neighborhood — everyone in the town — is affected when this happens.”

New Castle bust

Gaston wasn’t the only ECI community to see a large-scale meth bust in recent days.

According to an ISP media release, police raided two units at a New Castle apartment complex early Tuesday morning, resulting in four arrests on meth-related charges.

Troopers with the ISP Meth Suppression Section and New Castle Police Department officers served search two search warrants at Stonegate Village Apartments, 3302 Stonegate Drive, about 1:15 a.m. In the two apartments, officers reported finding “methamphetamine, a meth lab and the chemicals used to manufacture meth.”

Arrested in Apt. 15 were Richard V. Morris, 43, and Carol A. Jessup, 48, who were preliminarily charged with conspiracy to manufacture meth, possession of drug precursors, maintaining a common nuisance and possession of marijuana.

Arrested in Apt. 24 were Erika Pence, 41, and her husband, Bobby J. Pence Jr., 45. They were preliminarily charged with conspiracy to manufacture meth, unlawful sale of drug precursors, possession of meth and maintaining a common nuisance.

The investigation was the fourth-related meth raid in East Central Indiana since Friday. In total, 11 ECI residents were jailed in the four meth busts — two of which occurring in Muncie and the other two occurring in Gaston and New Castle.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.indystar.com/article/20131010/NEWS02/310100030/Indiana-town-back-spotlight-after-26-meth-arrests-2-years?nclick_check=1

 

Indiana State Police say Delaware County leads the state so far this year in meth lab busts and that the area is “full” of the drug.

 

// DELAWARE CO., Ind. (WISH) – Indiana State Police say Delaware County leads the state so far this year in meth lab busts and that the area is “full” of the drug.

Police said a concentrated effort to crack down on meth is part of the reason for the distinction and that the local law enforcement and the prosecutor’s office have done “a great job” tackling the problem.

Three of the latest meth-related arrests come from the town of Gaston a few miles north of Muncie. Police there said that makes 26 meth-related arrests in about two and a half years.

For a big city or even a county seat, that wouldn’t raise eyebrows. But Gaston is a small town of less than 900 people.

“I didn’t know it was quite that many,” said Rocky Whitehead of Gaston. The recent lab bust happened feet from his backyard.

“I don’t think there’s more meth in Gaston than there is in any other small community,” said Gaston Police Sgt. James Dixon. “You’ve got methamphetamine in every community.”

Dixon said his department has put a premium on stopping the epidemic and point to the numbers as proof that it’s working.

“All drugs are important but that particular drug is a detriment to communities all over,” he said.  “I’ll be honest with you. I’ve never seen someone that develops meth or uses meth that is a productive member of their community or society.”

So the officers on this small town department are focusing on meth — waging war along with the State Police Meth Suppression Team.

It’s a war being waged statewide. Last year, Indiana State Police dismantled 1,726 meth labs. They seized 1,437 in 2011, and 1,395 in 2010. A member of the Indiana State Police Meth Suppression Unit said they’re on track for another record-breaking year this year.

“It’s just a mess,” said Dixon. “So we’re doing our very best to clean it up.”

 

 

 

http://www.wishtv.com/news/local/police-crack-down-on-small-town-for-meth

 

 

Hillsdale, Mich.   —  — Amanda Lynn Francis, 35, of  Hillsdale was sentenced to one year in the Hillsdale County jail Monday as part  of her sentencing for possession of a controlled substance and operating while  intoxicated.

Francis was arrested in July during a routine traffic stop after she  was found to be cooking meth in a plastic bottle in her purse. She was  originally pulled over for having a taillight out and was traveling with her  brother and two young nieces.

Francis was sentenced in Hillsdale FCounty Circuit Court by Judge  Donald Sanderson after she pleaded guilty last month to possessing  methamphetamine.

When she pleaded guilty, Francis confirmed a trooper found a  one-pot cooking bottle in her purse that she was using to make meth. Francis  told Smith that she put together the ingredients two days earlier and was  waiting for the product to finish cooking when she was arrested. She also  explained to Smith exactly what she used and how she made the drug.

She was charged with OWI because she admitted to smoking marijuana  prior to getting in the car and driving. Three other charges — one count of  delivery/manufacturing a controlled substance, one count of operating a lab  involving methamphetamine and one count of open intoxicant in a vehicle —  were dismissed as part of a plea bargain.

The possession of a controlled substance charge carried a maximum  sentence of 10 years in prison.

Francis was remanded to the Hillsdale County Jail to begin her  sentence. She was given credit for two days served and must pay $1,290 in fines  and costs.

 

 

 

http://www.hillsdale.net/article/20131010/NEWS/131019958/1001/NEWS?refresh=true

 

 

 

MINERAL WELLS – After an eight-month investigation, regional law enforcement have made 19 arrests and confiscated 6 pounds of methamphetamine in a drug bust stretching from Palo Pinto County to Dallas. The City County Narcotics Unit led the operation with the help of the Palo Pinto County Sheriff’s Department, Mineral Wells Police Department, Texas Department of Public Safety, Palo Pinto County constables and the Weatherford-Parker County Special Crimes Unit.

In addition to the illegal drugs, law enforcement confiscated $11,000 in illegal cash proceeds and five firearms in Dallas. According to a press release, as of Thursday afternoon, all but two subjects involved in the organized drug ring were arrested, with 18 already indicted by a Palo Pinto Grand Jury in September for engaging in organized criminal activity.

“This was one of the bigger drug deals we’ve gotten into in a long time,” Palo Pinto County Sheriff Ira Mercer said. “I mean, six pounds of meth is a … ton of meth.

That’s nearly 3,000 grams of meth. So, that’s a lot of dope.” According to a CCNU source, the meth seized was in a pure form known as “ice,” valued at an estimated wholesale price between $10,000 and $13,500 per pound. The investigation discovered that Dallas was the source of the bulk of the meth, which was then eventually distributed by local individuals in Palo Pinto County.

Mercer said the meth in Dallas was most likely coming from a Mexican drug cartel.

“Unfortunately there’s not much we can do about that part of it, but if we can shut down the source and shut down the locals, it curtails it for a while,” he said in reference to the drugs from Mexico. “I’m proud of the effort that everybody put in. There was a lot of time, money and resources that went toward it, but it was certainly a fruitful deal as far as trying to curtail the local drug problem.”

Mercer said the long nature of the investigation might have led some people to believe that area law enforcement was not dealing with the local drug problem. However, Mercer was pleased with the results. He said this drug organization is “the primary source for methamphetamine in the county and certainly was something that needed to be done. We’ve done this many times over the years and it seems like it always flares back up with another group.  But we can’t stop fighting.”

In Thursday’s roundup, the following individuals were arrested as a result of the investigation:

• Cesar Fernando Alvarez-Hernandez, 27, of Dallas, possession of controlled substance over 400 grams, no bond.

• Benito Davila, Jr., 43, of Dallas, engaging in organized criminal activity, bond $250,000.

• Rolando Martinez, 34, of Dallas, engaging in organized criminal activity, bond $250,000.

• William James Robles, Jr., 32, of Dallas, engaging in organized criminal activity, bond $250,000.

• Jose Angel Sanchez, 33, of Dallas, engaging in organized criminal activity, bond $250,000.

• Michael Gaines Fewell, 51, of Mineral Wells, engaging in organized criminal activity, bond $100,000.

• Christopher Justin Moon, 29, of Mineral Wells, engaging in organized criminal activity, bond $100,000.

• Clinton Edward Newman, 37, of Mineral Wells, engaging in organized criminal activity, bond $100,000.

• Kristy Diane Roe, 37, of Mineral Wells, engaging in organized criminal activity, bond $200,000.

• Chisum Raines Valley, 31, of Mineral Wells, engaging in organized criminal activity, bond $100,000.

• Michael Scott Butler, 43, of Mineral Wells, engaging in organized criminal activity, bond $50,000.

• Alex Randall Leggett, 25, of Mineral Wells, engaging in organized criminal activity, bond $50,000.

• Kenneth Dean Lowe, 31, of Mineral Wells, engaging in organized criminal activity, bond $50,000.

• Joseph Kevin McKelvey, 51, of Mineral Wells, engaging in organized criminal activity, bond $50,000.

• Temkai Lee Obryant, 31, of Mineral Wells, engaging in organized criminal activity, bond $50,000.

• Ronald Wayne Strickland, of Mineral Wells, engaging in organized criminal activity, bond $50,000.

• Michael Shane Tinsley, 37, of Mineral Wells, engaging in organized criminal activity, bond $50,000.

• David Woodring, 38, of Mineral Wells, possession of drug paraphernalia.

• Kerri Scroggins, 29, of Mineral Wells, possession of drug paraphernalia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://weatherforddemocrat.com/top-news/x134977325/Palo-Pinto-County-bust-yields-6-pounds-of-meth-19-arrests

 

Akron — On Sept. 25, around 100 community members gathered at the Akron-Summit Public Library for the second annual Meth Lab Community Forum.

This speaker series, focusing on the dangers of using crystal meth, was organized by Summit County Children Services, and takes place at a time when the number of police seizures of meth labs in Summit County is on an increase.

Chris Crokett, an Akron Police officer of 13 years, provided an in-depth presentation on the devastation that illegal meth use has caused the community.

The Akron Police Department has “recorded 150 meth lab seizures so far in 2013, more than double the amount from 2009,” said Crokett.

Crystal meth is the common street name for methamphetamine, a substance that is created by mixing several toxic chemicals. Crokett’s visual presentation included graphic “before-and-after” pictures people whose physical appearance have been mutilated by meth.

If pictures of men and women with rotten teeth did not drive home how dangerous crystal meth is, an Akron woman gave her personal account of how the drug almost ended her life.

Apryl Miller, 29, told the audience her story of how she became hooked on meth as a teenager.

“I got access to meth from guys who thought I was attractive,” Miller said. “I started doing crazy things because of the drug such as sleeping in my car and getting high at work.”

After several encounters with the police, her addiction to meth landed her in jail. It was during this time of solitude that she decided to seek help with her struggle with drugs. Miller underwent treatment and recovery and is now using her hard life experience to help others by working at the Interval Brotherhood Home. The program gives recovering addicts the physical and emotional support needed to function in society.

According to Miller, the drug is highly addictive and makes it difficult to do daily tasks such as eat or sleep. “When I was on meth I would hallucinate and see things that were not there,” Miller said. “If my family wanted me to go somewhere like Cedar Point or a birthday party I had to be high before I went.”

The Akron Police Department also set up a mock meth lab, comprised of a bedroom set and many of the household items that are used to cook meth including lithium batteries, lighter fluid and two liter Coke bottles. While these are all items that can be found in the average home, when mixed together they are highly flammable and extremely dangerous.

“People who make meth are basically taking their lives in their hands,” Crokett said. “Even a bead of sweat from a person making meth can cause a lab to ignite.

The police officers in attendance suggested a few warning signs to look for if you suspect that meth is being used or distributed in your neighborhood. Akron Police Department’s Lt. Brian Simcox shared that many houses where meth is cooked will be permeated with an ammonia like odor. Meth houses may also have a rundown appearance and windows open in all seasons for ventilation. Meth labs can be found in houses or discarded in parks and in dumpsters. Police warned community members that if they encounter a lab, do not touch it and get to safety.

 

 

 

http://www.thegatewaynews.com/news%20local/2013/10/10/meth-lab-community-forum-shows-the-ugly-side-of-meth-use

 

 

SALEM, Ohio – The increased use of a new method for manufacturing methamphetamine is putting the general public at risk. A recent case in Salem is a prime example.

In Columbiana County municipal court, 42-year old Christopher Neiswonger is arraigned on charges stemming from a search of his West Pershing Street apartment.

Pershing Street
Pershing Street

The Drug Task Force recovered chemicals and other evidence used to manufacture methamphetamine. The police chief says residents of other apartments in the building were evacuated.

“You know everybody in the building ends up being exposed to the chemicals,” said Chief J.T. Panezott.

The chief says with the one-pot method, authorities are seeing more meth being made in apartments, motel rooms and other small spaces.

“We’re seeing almost exclusively the one pot method, where they’re using a 20 ounce bottle, mixing the chemicals, and that bottle has to be vented every so often or it will build up pressure and explode,” Panezott said.

A representative of the federal Drug Enforcement Agency said that’s one of the reasons extra precautions are taken when dealing with meth labs.

“And when that bottle does explode it will spray those chemicals and acids which can burn and could cause death,” the DEA representative said.

There’s a further danger when these bottles, still containing harmful chemicals and acids, are discarded in the trash or on the street.

“People walking their dogs discover these and people collecting trash on the side of the road,” said the DEA.

The arrest of Neiswonger followed a seven month investigation.

He’s charged with production of a controlled substance and illegal assembly or possession of a controlled substance.

He remains jailed on a $250,000 bond pending a preliminary hearing.

Authorities say anyone who has suspicions of methamphetamine activity should contact their local police.

 

 

 

http://www.wfmj.com/story/23661346/meth-arrest-shows-danger-to-public

 

 

On Wednesday the DEA, FBI and Odessa’s SWAT team executed a search warrant on the 1500 block of Whitaker in Odessa where they arrested 3 people, found 5 guns, 30 grams of crystal methamphetamine and a potential explosive device charge.

Braxton Stokes, Baili McCain and Christopher Harrington were arrested yesterday and were charged today with possessing over 5 grams of methamphetamine with intent to distribute.  News of their arrest was shocking to some neighbors, while others say there weren’t surprised.

“Task force man come in and bust in the door, through a flash bomb in that door and in the door, all the cops swarmed the streets, I didn’t even know that Odessa had that many cops,” said neighbor of suspect Ruben Gutierrez

Some neighbors say that the people living here were up all hours of the night and didn’t ever seem to go to work, so when they were hardly surprised by the police’s raid.

“Them partying all the time, and always seeing a lot of movement at night time, there is always activity, I am always watching,” said neighbor of suspect, Jeremy Acosta.

While other neighbors say the arrests come as a shock, and that the arrested trio were always friendly, the kind of neighbors you could borrow sugar from.

“Yea it was shocking, yea yea it was shocking, Braxton he is a real good guy, a real good dude, he likes to play a lot of basketball,” said Ruben Gutierrez

Whether neighbors found the arrests shocking or not they all agreed that they are concerned of where their children are growing up.

“What I am concerned about is how it’s happening so close to our kids, we have to come home and that’s going on in our neighborhood, the people that are in danger is our children and that’s our future,” said Jeremy Acosta.

All of the suspects face a minimum of 5 years to a maximum of 40 years behind bars as well as a million dollar fine.

 

 

 

http://www.permianbasin360.com/story/neighbors-react-to-narcotics-bust-in-odessa/d/story/CNE66FgyV0C9eqpHC9wjiA