WASHINGTON –- A police officer from Salem, Virginia, on a Drug Enforcement Administration task force out of Roanoke pleaded guilty on Tuesday to soliciting and obtaining a sexual favor from a drug defendant in exchange for recommending a federal prosecutor seek out a lighter sentence for the defendant.

Kevin C. Moore, 42, of the Salem Police Department, appeared before a federal judge in Roanoke on Tuesday and pleaded guilty to one count of bribery. He was arrested in October without incident and was suspended from both the police department and the DEA task force the same day, but his case was not unsealed until Tuesday.

While the charge in the case relates to only one woman, Moore admitted to soliciting oral sex from another defendant and to soliciting both oral sex and sexual intercourse from a third defendant. The earliest incident dates back to 2009.

In the latest case, the officer admitted to exchanging text messages with a woman who was cooperating in an investigation into methamphetamine distribution. The woman in question pleaded guilty as part of a plea agreement in September 2014, and had been scheduled to be sentenced this month.

Moore’s text messages with the woman are relayed in court filings and, as an FBI agent investigating the case wrote, “made clear to the [cooperating witness] that a sexual relationship could yield a favorable sentence recommendation to the Assistant United States Attorney.”

Moore referred to the defendant as a “wild thang” and wrote in one text message in June that he was “going to take care of you as long as you take care of me.” He texted her that she needed to “release some stress,” and when she replied that she didn’t know how, he said, “Oh I bet… You can figure out something I know. Lol.”

Moore and the woman continued exchanging text messages in August, with him repeatedly telling her she owed him. The woman backed out of one meeting on Aug. 15, which apparently upset Moore. “You better make it up to me. Lol,” he wrote. “You better make it up big time.”

A day later, on Aug. 16, Moore wrote that the defendant owed him “a real good one tho.” When the woman wrote that she wasn’t quite sure if they were on the same page about what he wanted, and that she was “in the dark,” Moore wrote back “U know girl. Everything!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!”

Moore and the woman met up at a McDonald’s on Aug. 21, then drove to a BP gas station, where the woman performed oral sex on the officer. She later described his demeanor as aggressive, but said he didn’t use physical force.

Roughly an hour after the encounter ended, Moore texted the federal prosecutor handling the woman’s case and told the prosecutor that the woman was assisting in an investigation of an individual thought to be involved in distributing a large amount of methamphetamine. He later informed the woman that the prosecutor had “knocked a lot of the drug weight off” in her case, which would mean a lesser sentence.

Moore is scheduled to be sentenced on Feb. 2.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/12/16/dea-sexual-favors_n_6335584.html

 

A man who groped and indecently assaulted three women in Canberra at night has been sentenced to more than two years behind bars.

Daniel Van Eyle, 23, of Gordon, pleaded guilty to indecently assaulting a woman at the Davey Lodge in Acton and another at the McDonald’s outlet in Braddon.

A third woman was indecently assaulted at the entrance to the Adina Apartment Hotel in Northbourne Avenue in Braddon.

The acts occurred in the early hours of the morning in May.

Van Eyle also pleaded guilty to several other crimes, including drug possession and possessing a knife in a public place, which also took place earlier this year.

He was sentenced for the string of offences in the ACT Magistrates Court on Wednesday.

The court was told Van Eyle held down his female victim during the Acton assault and told her: “Why don’t I hold you down and rape you while others watch and do nothing?”

Magistrate Lorraine Walker said the incident must have been “highly concerning” for the woman.

Van Eyle also assaulted a female bus driver and two teenage girls after, whilst under the influence of methamphetamine, at a bus stop in May.

Ms Walker said the assault on the “vulnerable” woman was unprovoked, and the two young girls were “simply caught in the crossfire of your violent and erratic behavior”.

She described the McDonald’s assault, where Van Eyle unzipped a woman’s skirt while she stood in the queue and touched her inappropriately, as brazen and said it was “hardly surprising” the woman was intimidated.

In handing down the sentence, Ms Walker said Van Eyle had started using cannabis and methamphetamine since his early teens and his ongoing drug use contributed to his offending.

Ms Walker said there was a high risk he would reoffend and he hadn’t shown any remorse for his victims.

She said there was a need to protect the community from him.

“Your actions had a real and significant impact on the people who were subjected to them,” she said.

Ms Walker said Van Eyle suffered from a substance abuse disorder and sexual sadism disorder, but was amenable to treatment.

She said any prison term shouldn’t be “crushing”, but needed to be structured in a way that would support Van Eyle’s rehabilitation.

He was sentenced to 29 months in jail with a non-parole period of 18 months.

He will be eligible for release in November 2015.

Ms Walker said any parole granted should include careful monitoring and psychiatric support.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/canberra-man-who-groped-women-sentenced-to-time-behind-bars-20141217-128vb9.html

 

morrill+anthony+timothyA father, son and the son’s girlfriend have been charged with felony counts of manufacturing methamphetamine.

The St. Lawrence County Sheriff’s Office Drug Task Force arrested 49 year old Timothy Morrill, his 25 year old son Anthony and Anthony’s 32 year old girlfriend April Regan.

The arrests followed a raid at their home at 39 South Main Street in Norwood.

All three were charged with a felony count of third-degree manufacturing methamphetamine. Regan was released to probation supervision.

The Morrills are being held in the county jail.

Anthony Morrill was ordered held on $5,000 cash bail or $10,000 bond.

Timothy Morrill’s bail was set at $2,500 cash or $5,000 bond.

More charges are expected.

This is the second time this month that Timothy Morrill has been in the news.

On December 2, fire heavily damaged his home at 3 Bernard Avenue in Norwood.

At the time, sources told 7 News a suspected methamphetamine lab may have been the cause of the blaze.

Undersheriff Scott Bonno said Timothy was living with his son when he was arrested.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.wwnytv.com/news/local/Father-Son–Girlfriend-Accused-Of-Making-Meth-285982571.html

 

MOULTRIE — A Colquitt County prison inmate’s dreams of a white Christmas evaporated as officers seized suspected methamphetamine, marijuana, and a cell phone and arrested him and his daughter. 5490fb55ebe68_image

Police are seeking a third man, the daughter’s boyfriend, who reportedly accompanied her on the trip from Gray, Ga.

Colquitt County Correctional Institution officers became suspicious when a woman, later identified as Halie Brooke Jones, showed up at an area where road equipment is kept with a man in a white Mazda B2500.

Jones gave her father, Jerry Lee Jones, 45, an inmate at the institution, a hug, Colquitt County Sheriff’s Office Inv. Jerome Burgess said. The location where she and the boyfriend traveled to was not at the prison’s current location at 200 S. Vandenburg Road, but at the old prison located behind Colquitt County Jail.

The behavior of Halie Jones and her boyfriend, who were on prison property, was considered “extremely suspicious” by officials, sheriff’s reports said. They claimed they had car trouble and left a short time later.

Prison officers began checking the area after their departure and one found a freezer bag containing several cell phone chargers. They then found sugar and Coffee Mate inside a prisoner’s bag inside a bus used to transport prisoners.

A deputy’s drug dog alerted on an orange bucket inside the bus where officers found a cell phone and charger, bags of suspected marijuana and suspected methamphetamine, a glass pipe, five cigarette lighters and six packs of cigarette rolling papers, the reports said.

Halie Jones, 19, 309 Autumn Ridge Trail, Gray, has been charged with nine counts of delivering items prohibited by inmates. The boyfriend faces the same charges.

Jerry Jones, 45, was charged with possession of marijuana with intent, items prohibited by inmates and possession of methamphetamine with intent.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.moultrieobserver.com/news/local_news/inmate-daughter-charged-in-prison-drug-delivery/article_50d733c2-859e-11e4-a646-cfc794352dac.html

 

 

Calls from concerned drivers have led to the arrest of a Brampton man now accused of driving a tractor trailer on Highway 115 while impaired by drugs.

Responding to complaints from several people of a truck swerving between lanes on Hwy. 115,  Peterborough County OPP  stopped a truck driving south on Hwy. 115 near Porter Road in Kawartha Lakes Dec. 15.

Pawanpreet Buttar, 29, is charged with impaired driving, possession of heroin and methamphetamine. Mr Buttar is scheduled to appear in Peterborough Provincial Court on Jan. 22, 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.cambridgetimes.ca/news-story/5208672-hwy-115-tractor-trailer-driver-charged-with-impaired-possession-of-heroin-and-methamphetamine/

 

ON her 12th birthday, Mt Morgan woman Carleen Barrett received a present most young ones don’t expect.

A shot of methamphetamine.

That shot was to be the start and source of the 32-year-old’s habitual drug problems, particularly with methamphetamine, in the years to come.

Barrett pleaded guilty in the Rockhampton District Court on Friday to a string of drug charges, including unlawfully supplying methamphetamine and oxycontin.

Legal officer for the Crown Alexandra Baker described the defendant as playing the role of “making connections” and organizing the transactions between drug buyers and dealers.

The police searched her house in February of this year but she wasn’t home.

They subsequently attended Rockhampton Hospital (where it’s believed Barrett was located) and performed a search of her car.

Ms Baker said police officers found a “tick” book, which contained names of people and details relating to personal loans.

The court heard people often contacted Barrett for drugs and she would make those connections to dealers.

Ms Baker told the court buyers often contacted Barrett for drugs so she would arrange a man to drive her to Rockhampton to meet the dealer.

Upon meeting, the dealer would supply her 0.1 g of methamphetamine, which was colloquially known as a point.

In exchange for driving her, Barrett would give half of that point to her driver.

Defense barrister Tom Polley said his client had an “unfortunate” upbringing.

He told the court Barrett’s mother ended up in a relationship with a man who was a habitual drug and alcohol user; and was violent.

Mr Polley said when the man left Barrett’s mother, the latter was violent towards her children.

The court heard Barrett subsequently ended up on the streets at the age of 11. It was on her 12th birthday when a friend’s father injected Barnett with a shot of methamphetamine.

The defendant subsequently ended up in foster care.

Outside the Rockhampton Courthouse, Barrett told the Morning Bulletin she was grateful to have been given the opportunity to spend another day with her children.

“If you’re doing drugs, methamphetamine or anything else, get off it now … it’s not worth it,” she said. “I’ve been seeing a counselor and the sessions have helped me a lot.” Chief Judge Kerry O’Brien sentenced Barrett to nine months imprisonment. She was released on parole.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.themorningbulletin.com.au/news/womans-drug-habit-started-at-an-early-age/2484883/

 

SALT LAKE CITY — In addition to incurring serious dental problems, memory loss and other physical and mental issues, methamphetamine users are three times more at risk for getting Parkinson’s disease than non-illicit drug users, new research from the University of Utah and Intermountain Healthcare shows.

The researchers also observed that women who use methamphetamine may be nearly five times more likely to get Parkinson’s disease compared to women who don’t use drugs. Although findings suggest the risk in women may be higher than that in men, additional studies are needed to corroborate a gender difference.methgfdegsg

“Typically, fewer females use meth than males do,” says Glen R. Hanson, an expert in drug addiction, professor and interim dean of the University of Utah School of Dentistry and professor of pharmacology and toxicology, the study’s senior author. “Even though women are less likely to use it, there appears to be a gender bias toward women in the association between meth use and Parkinson’s.”

The study looked at more than 40,000 records in the Utah Population Database, a compilation of genealogical, medical and government-provided information on Utah families that is managed by the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah. Karen Curtin, research assistant professor of medicine at the University and associate director of the UPDB, is the study’s first author. Records from University of Utah Health Care and Intermountain Healthcare also provided unidentified patient data that was essential for getting a statewide perspective on the research.

The study confirms an earlier one that looked at nearly 250,000 California hospital discharge records and found a similar risk for Parkinson’s among meth users. That study, however, did not report risks based on gender and looked only at records of hospital inpatients. Hanson and Curtin’s study included both Utah inpatient and outpatient clinic records, capturing a wider segment of the population.

Parkinson’s disease is a progressive movement disorder, with onset typically at age 60 or older, that affects nerve cells in the brain. Its symptoms include tremor, or shaking, often starting in a hand or fingers; slowed movement, such as walking; rigid muscles; loss of automatic movements — blinking or smiling, for example — and speech changes. There is no cure for Parkinson’s, but medications and surgery can alleviate symptoms. It is estimated that 4 million to 6 million people worldwide have the condition.

Hanson, Curtin and their colleagues examined medical records, dating from 1996 through 2011, separated into three groups: those of nearly 5,000 people whose health records indicated they had used meth (including amphetamines), more than 1,800 records indicating cocaine use, and records of a control group of more than 34,000 people selected at random whose health and other records showed no use of illicit drugs. The control group was matched to the meth and cocaine users according to age and sex. The researchers made sure that the group of meth users did not have a medical history of taking other illicit drugs or abusing alcohol, which might have influenced the risk for Parkinson’s.

Cocaine users, who provided a non-meth illicit drug comparison, were not at increased risk for Parkinson’s. “We feel comfortable that it’s just the meth causing the risk for Parkinson’s, and not other drugs or a combination of meth and other drugs,” Hanson says.

The reason female meth users are more at risk for Parkinson’s is not clear. Symptoms of the disease appeared in both female and male meth users in their 50s or later, indicating that the effects of meth may manifest years after initial use. “Oftentimes, we think about what drugs do in the short term, but we don’t tend to give much thought to long-term consequences,” Hanson says.

Meth has become in some ways the drug of choice in the West, where it’s used more commonly than in other parts of the country. In Utah, the trend toward meth use is particularly pronounced in women their late 20s and older who start taking the drug because of pressure from a partner or spouse.

“Female users in Utah may also get involved with meth because it’s seen as a relatively cheap and effective way to lose weight and have more energy,” Curtin says.

Previous studies show that when women begin using drugs, they take smaller amounts than men, but escalate more rapidly to addiction and are at greater risk for relapse.

“Normally, women develop Parkinson’s less often than men …,” Curtin says. “If meth addiction leads to sharply increased incidence of Parkinson’s disease in women, we should all be concerned.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.standard.net/Health/2014/12/16/Meth-users-greatly-at-risk-for-Parkinson-s-disease.html

 

 

In addition to incurring serious dental problems, memory loss and other physical and mental issues, methamphetamine users are three times more at risk for getting Parkinson’s disease than non-illicit drug users, new research from the University of Utah and Intermountain Healthcare shows.

The researchers also observed that women who use methamphetamine may be nearly five times more likely to get Parkinson’s disease compared to women who don’t use drugs. Although findings suggest the risk in women may be higher than that in men, additional studies are needed to corroborate a gender difference.

“Typically, fewer females use meth than males do,” says Glen R. Hanson, D.D.S., Ph.D., a nationally recognized expert in drug addiction, professor and interim dean of the University of Utah School of Dentistry and professor of pharmacology and toxicology, the study’s senior author. “Even though women are less likely to use it, there appears to be a gender bias toward women in the association between meth use and Parkinson’s.”

Published Dec. 11, 2014, in Drug and Alcohol Dependence, the study looked at more than 40,000 records in the Utah Population Database (UPDB), a unique compilation of genealogical, medical, and government-provided information on Utah families that is managed by the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah. Karen Curtin, Ph.D., research assistant professor of medicine at the University and associate director of the UPDB, is the study’s first author. Records from University of Utah Health Care and Intermountain Healthcare also provided unidentified patient data that was essential for getting a statewide perspective on the research.

The study confirms an earlier one that looked at nearly 250,000 California hospital discharge records and found a similar risk for Parkinson’s among meth users. That study, however, did not report risks based on gender and looked only at records of hospital inpatients. Hanson and Curtin’s study included both Utah inpatient and outpatient clinic records, capturing a wider segment of the population.

Parkinson’s disease is a progressive movement disorder, with onset typically at age 60 or older, that affects nerve cells in the brain. Its symptoms include tremor, or shaking, often starting in a hand or fingers; slowed movement, such as walking; rigid muscles; loss of automatic movements-blinking or smiling, for example-and speech changes. There is no cure for Parkinson’s, but medications and surgery can alleviate symptoms. It is estimated that 4 million to 6 million people worldwide have the condition.

Hanson, Curtin and their colleagues examined medical records, dating from 1996 through 2011, separated into three groups: those of nearly 5,000 people whose health records indicated they had used meth (including amphetamines), more than 1,800 records indicating cocaine use, and records of a control group of more than 34,000 people selected at random whose health and other records showed no use of illicit drugs. The control group was matched to the meth and cocaine users according to age and sex. The researchers made sure that the group of meth users did not have a medical history of taking other illicit drugs or abusing alcohol, which might have influenced the risk for Parkinson’s.

Cocaine users, who provided a non-meth illicit drug comparison, were not at increased risk for Parkinson’s. “We feel comfortable that it’s just the meth causing the risk for Parkinson’s, and not other drugs or a combination of meth and other drugs,” Hanson says.

All identifying information was removed from the records, so people counted in the study remained anonymous.

The reason female meth users are more at risk for Parkinson’s is not clear. Symptoms of the disease appeared in both female and male meth users in their 50s or later, indicating that the effects of meth may manifest years after initial use. “Oftentimes, we think about what drugs do in the short term, but we don’t tend to give much thought to long-term consequences,” Hanson says.

Meth has become in some ways the drug of choice in the West, where it’s used more commonly than in other parts of the country. In Utah, the trend toward meth use is particularly pronounced in women their late 20s and older who start taking the drug because of pressure from a partner or spouse.

“Female users in Utah may also get involved with meth because it’s seen as a relatively cheap and effective way to lose weight and have more energy,” Curtin says. Previous studies show that when women begin using drugs, they take smaller amounts than men, but escalate more rapidly to addiction and are at greater risk for relapse. “Normally, women develop Parkinson’s less often than men; however, women may not achieve the same improvement in symptoms from medications or surgery. “If meth addiction leads to sharply increased incidence of Parkinson’s disease in women, we should all be concerned.”

 

 

Source: University of Utah Health Sciences

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.news-medical.net/news/20141217/Methamphetamine-use-may-increase-Parkinsons-disease-risk.aspx

 

SAN LUIS, Ariz. (KGUN9-TV) – U.S. Customs and Border Protection seized more than 132 pounds of methamphetamine and heroin between December 11 and December 14.CBP+Drugs+121614

On December 11, officers referred Janet Esmeralda Soria-Caravantes, 24, of San Luis Rio Colorado, Sonora, Mexico for further inspection of her Honda SUV. CBP+Drugs+121614+(4)CBP+Drugs+121614+(3)

 

A CBP narcotics detection canine alerted to the presence of drugs beneath the back seats, officers removed 14 packages of meth weighing more than 22 pounds and worth nearly $68,000.

Also on December 11, officers arrested Abraham Ruvalcaba-Zepeda, 21, of San Luis Rio Colorado, Sonora, Mexico after a service canine alerted officers to nearly 21 pounds of meth, worth almost $63,000, under the rear seats of a sedan he was driving.

Officers arrested Cesar Linarez-Pimental, a 43-year-old Mexican national on December 12 after a canine alerted to the tailgate of his truck and officers found 30 packages of meth valued at just over $94,000.

CBP+Drugs+121614+(2)

On December 13, Miguel Anjel Lugo-Sanchez, a 56-year-old Mexican national living legally in Somerton, Arizona, was arrested after a canine alerted to more than $157,000 worth of meth and $71,000 worth of heroin throughout the vehicle.

Officials seized all drugs and vehicles involved, and turned the subjects over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.jrn.com/kgun9/news/CBP-seized-more-than-132-pounds-of-methamphetamine-heroin-285980551.html

 

A Maryville man learned the value of wearing a seat belt while playing chauffeur to a mobile meth lab last week, according to Blount County Sheriff’s Office reports.

Christopher Daniel Williams, 27, Thornhill Drive, Maryville, was arrested Saturday on a charge of initiation of a process to manufacture methamphetamine; two charges of violation of probation (related to theft); a charge of failure to appear in court; and a charge of evading arrest. He was held on a $26,550 bond.548fa0e212113_image

A sheriff’s office corporal was driving on Jackson Avenue Dec. 7 when he noticed a white Chevrolet Malibu at a stop sign. The officer observed that the Malibu driver appeared to have forgotten to wear his seat belt.

The officer pulled in behind him, reports said, for further observation. After a couple of turns, reports said the Malibu began speeding away.

Pursuit continued down Norris Avenue, to Arthur Avenue, Main Road and Houston Avenue. Then, upon hitting the 700 block of Houston, the Malibu driver suddenly stopped, left his vehicle running and his door open and took off on foot.

Cpl. Bradley Garner followed for a couple of blocks before losing sight of the fleeing suspect.

Calling for backup, he went back to the abandoned Malibu and found a methamphetamine lab set up in the front seat of the car.

The back seat of the Malibu also contained suspicious items, reports said, including a number of tools police believe may have been used to break into vehicles.

Blount County Sheriff’s Officers tracked down Williams — the man they believed to have been behind the wheel of the Malibu — Saturday on Calderwood Highway. Williams was taken into custody without incident on the methamphetamine charge and other outstanding warrants.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.thedailytimes.com/news/possible-seat-belt-violation-leads-to-methamphetamine-arrest/article_dae71da8-d4b4-5ae6-bb9c-dca1a94ae131.html

 

A raid on the Philippines’ biggest jail on Monday uncovered drug lords “living like kings” in secret luxury cells with strip bars, sex dolls, a Jacuzzi and methamphetamines, the justice secretary said.

Police commandos in full battle armor and tracker dogs swooped down on the infamously crowded and corrupt Bilibid prison complex before dawn to verify reports that drug rings were operated from behind bars.

Aside from the methamphetamine “ice”, police found 1.4 million pesos ($31,000) in cash, inflatable sex dolls, a strip bar and a Jacuzzi, across 20 air-conditioned “villas”, Justice Secretary Leila de Lima said.

article-800143fe-7a41-478b-a45e-032910728d9e-6UqDbDUpZHSK2-871_634x411The Philippine penal system has been rocked by allegations of wealthy prisoners bribing the guards

“They are here to serve jail time but instead, they’re living like kings,” de Lima told reporters after the raid.

Jail officials who conspired with the inmates face “outright dismissal”, she said.

During Monday’s raid, one “villa” had a fully inflated sex doll sprawled on the bed while an adjacent room was equipped with an elevated platform, strobe lights and a mirror ball, police said.

Police said the platform was for strippers who were smuggled into the jail compound. A bright blue bra with feathers was hung beside the stage.

Another area had a small concert stage equipped with a flat screen television, a drum set, guitars and keyboards.

A safe in one of the rooms contained Rolex and Patek Philippe watches, Louis Vuitton wallets and stacks of dollar bills, police said.

Bathroom floors and walls were covered in marble tiles, showers with hot water were encased in glass and a bathtub had a flat screen television attached to it.

One room was stocked with an expensive whiskey brand.

Bilibid, on the outskirts of Manila was built for 8,900 inmates but currently houses 23,000.

The luxury villas, for drugs lords, kidnap gang leaders and other powerful inmates, were scattered around the sprawling 500-hectare (1,230-acre) compound.

De Lima expressed shock at the outcome of the raid.

But cases of rich inmates bribing prison authorities and building small houses, or simply leaving the jail, have emerged publicly repeatedly over the years.

The practice highlights corruption in government and the wide divide between rich and poor as the rest of the prisoners, mostly petty criminals, are crammed in squalid cells.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/afp/article-2874639/Strip-bars-drugs-uncovered-Philippine-jail-raid.html

 

ROSEBURG, Ore. — A Douglas County couple was arrested for the second time in two months on drug and weapons charges. Mark and Lori Bogle, both 51, were arrested by the Douglas Interagency Narcotics Team in mid-October while the Bogles were using a stolen vehicle to transport a pound of Methamphetamine to Douglas County.141021+Bogle+arrest+660

In the early-morning hours Wednesday (Dec. 10), investigators from DINT caught the pair again after hours of interviews and surveillance generated evidence indicating they were once again smuggling Methamphetamine into Douglas County with the intent to sell. The Bogles were stopped in a vehicle on NE Stephens/Highway 99 in Roseburg just after midnight.

DINT officials say the Bogles were in possession of about a quarter-pound of Methamphetamine with a street value of approximately $4,000. In addition, three weapons were seized, including a sawed-off shotgun and a modified paintball gun.

Both defendants were charged with the Unlawful Possession, Manufacture and Delivery of methamphetamine, and with multiple firearms offenses pursuant to their status as convicted felons as well as illegal modifications made to one of the two shotguns found in the vehicle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.kpic.com/news/local/Douglas-Co-couple-arrested-for-2nd-time-on-drug–weapons-charges-285876601.html

 

 

Coquille, Ore. – A Coos Bay woman was sentenced to 81 months in prison on drug-related charges following an investigation initiated by detectives in March 2013, according to the South Coast Interagency Narcotics Team.  141215+Pamila+Sue+Miller+660

According to a report from SCINT, Pamila Sue Miller was selling methamphetamine from a secluded log home on Easy Creek Lane in Coos Bay.

Officials say a volume of short stay traffic consistent with drug dealing was documented in relation to Miller’s home.  Over the course of several months, Miller sold various quantities of methamphetamine to SCINT agents.141215+Miller+bag+of+meth+660

Authorities say during these transactions, Miller discussed having other dealers she supplied methamphetamine, the fact she purchases a pound of methamphetamine, guaranteed quality and could obtain as much methamphetamine as she desired.

At the conclusion of the investigation, Detectives learned that Miller had immediate access to large amounts of cash, and had been dealing very large amounts of methamphetamine over a significant period of time.

SCINT detectives eventually obtained a search warrant for the Easy Creek Lane address, which revealed more than $3,000 in cash, firearms, drug transaction records, packaging materials, and over 500 grams of methamphetamine. The methamphetamine had a street value of more than $50,000.00 and represented more than 5,000 individual doses of methamphetamine, according to SCINT.

141215+Pamila+Sue+Miller+Home+660

Miller pled guilty to a fourteen count indictment.  Pursuant to Oregon Sentencing Guidelines, she was sentenced to a total of eighty-one months in custody followed by thirty-six months post-prison supervision.

SCINT encourages the public to report narcotics activity on the web by going to http://www.scint.us and “Report a Dealer”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.kpic.com/news/local/Coos-Bay-woman-sentenced-to-prison-on-drug-charges-285872791.html

 

BRAMPTON — A Superior Court judge has sentenced a Brampton drug trafficker to five years in jail for his role in what’s believed to be one of the largest drug labs ever discovered in Peel.Meth___Content

Randall Chambers, 31, was convicted of possession of methamphetamine for the purpose of trafficking earlier this year and was sentenced Friday in Toronto court.

His sentence comes just a few months after Ramprit Goswami, 36, and Roland Da Breo, 35, were convicted of the same offence and jailed seven and five years respectively.

Earlier this year, another man arrested in the sting, Velle Chanmany, 32, of Kitchener, was jailed nine years in relation to the massive methamphetamine and ecstasy lab discovered in east Mississauga.

Calling Chanmany a major participant in the “high-level, wholesale delivery of a very dangerous drug,” Justice Michael Dambrot said he had to send a strong message to deter Chanmany and others from high-level drug trafficking.

“The offence of possession of methamphetamine for the purpose of trafficking is of increasing prevalence in this province, and has come to be recognized as a most serious offence. Methamphetamine is consistently referred to as a hard drug. It causes enormous harm to individual users, and significant harm to the health and safety of the community,” the judge said in his ruling. “It has been said that in many respects, the destructive consequences of crystal methamphetamine mirror those of two other hard drugs, heroin and cocaine…in addition, the methamphetamine offence committed by Chanmany is a particularly serious one. Seven kilos of methamphetamine is a very large quantity indeed.”

Chanmany was convicted of possession of methamphetamine for the purpose of trafficking and possession of Canadian currency that was the proceeds of crime.

The men convicted thus far were part of 36 people arrested in spring 2008 in connection with a joint-forces investigation dubbed Project Blackhawk, which was sparked after a traffic stop in Toronto led police to the drug lab they eventually dismantled on Sismet Rd., near Dixie Rd. and Matheson Blvd., on April 29, 2008.

Toronto Police and Peel Regional Police seized 4,000 kilograms of methamphetamine and more than 400,000 tablets of ecstasy from the Sismet Rd. lab, with a potential street value of more than $160 million.

In convicting Chanmany, Dambrot rejected Chanmany’s argument that Toronto drug squad officers falsely claimed to have seized seven kilograms of crystal meth from his SUV.

Defence lawyers argued that Toronto officers were motivated to fabricate evidence out of frustration and anger after failing to collect proof of his cocaine dealing during a major drug investigation.

But Dambrot did not believe Chanmany, whom he called a “lazy and greedy young man who had an aversion to work,” and said there was nothing raised by the defense that undermined the police evidence.

Of the officers involved in the case, Dambrot said, “There is nothing in this that logically would have led them to do what the defense alleges.”

Sismet Rd. has been a hotbed for drug labs, with four being discovered on the street, made up largely of industrial units and warehouses, in the last five years. The most recent was this past February when a $1.5-million marijuana lab was found.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.bramptonguardian.com/news-story/5207040-meth-trafficker-jailed-in-massive-drug-lab-discovery-in-mississauga/

 

On Thursday, at almost midnight, the Washington Parish Sheriff’s Office received a call for assistance from Louisiana Probation and Parole agents. The agents had visited a residence on Heidelberg Road near Franklinton and detected a strong chemical smell inside the house.548ef986abddd_image

Sheriff’s Office Drug Task Force detectives went to the scene and discovered two operating ammonia methamphetamine labs in the back bedroom of the house. Detectives rendered the labs safe and collected evidence along with drug paraphernalia and packaged methamphetamine.

Christopher McClain, 41, and Nicole Christine Davis, 31, were arrested and charged with manufacture of Schedule II drugs, possession of Schedule II drugs and possession of drug paraphernalia.

Upon learning of the midnight arrests, Washington Parish Sheriff Randy Seal complimented Probation and Parole agents and the Sheriff’s Office Drug Task Force for a job well done.

Meth is a very toxic poison which produces a quick high and a quick addiction,” Seal said. “The manufacture of meth is very dangerous. All officers involved did an outstanding job in shutting down this illegal meth lab and putting the operators in jail.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.gobogalusa.com/news/article_892f6ad4-846b-11e4-82e7-6fe24b98d004.html

 

There’s growing awareness that it’s not just methamphetamine, or P, labs contaminating homes. Smoking the drug can also make them unhealthy.

While Auckland Council has just revealed tough new rules to clean up homes contaminated by meth, it admits its focus has been on the producers of the drug and not its users.

Nicholas Powell is a scientist whose company tests homes for meth contamination. Swabs are taken from walls and surfaces and are then analyzed, not only for the drug itself but also the ingredients used to make it.

“It’s not uncommon to just see methamphetamine on the swab,” he says.

That indicates the contamination is solely due to smoking the drug, and can be at levels in excess of the Health Ministry’s acceptable limit.

“We might see up to one or two micrograms per 100 square centimeters, so potentially double or quadruple the Ministry of Health guidelines,” says Mr Powell. “There is no doubt the Ministry of Health guidelines can be exceeded by smoking, though it might be heavy smoking.”

Toxicologist Leo Schep says the biggest risk is to young children and people with heart conditions, with “long-term exposure over weeks, months, where they are in contact with surfaces that have methamphetamine on them, which can lead to toxicity”.

There’s growing awareness of meth contamination caused by consumption but not manufacture as more and more property buyers and investors carry out precautionary testing of homes, even where police are not involved.

Councils meanwhile are only now getting fully to grips with the problem. Auckland has revealed it’s drawn up new protocols to deal with affected homes that include forcing owners to decontaminate to an acceptable level.

“What we’re seeing now with the volume of homes affected is that it’s necessary to put in safe standards so when homes are reoccupied, people can do so safely,” says Auckland Council compliance manager Grant Barnes.

He wasn’t aware of contamination due solely to consumption but said the protocols will be applied regardless of how the contamination occurs, but only if it comes to council’s attention.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.3news.co.nz/nznews/meth-use-contaminates-nz-homes-2014121618#axzz3M4tpfh21

 

 

The arrest of two teenage boys caught carrying $2.5 million of methamphetamine in a luxury car has led to a series of drug raids on the Headhunter motorcycle gang, police say.

Police have arrested 38 people, confiscated 22 guns and seized more than $17 million in methamphetamine, cash and assets in a series of operations targeting the gang this week.

Detective Inspector Bruce Good says the arrests came after two Headhunter gang associates, aged 17 and 18, were pulled over in a Mercedes on the way from Whangarei to Auckland in November.

“Inside the vehicle we discovered methamphetamine with an estimated street value of $2.5 million which police believe was bound for the Auckland market and beyond.”

The teens’ arrest helped lead police to a huge methamphetamine manufacturing operation in a rural area close to Whangarei, Mr Good says.

Detective Inspector Kevin Burke says the Whangarei operation had the capacity to produce $3 million of methamphetamine per week.

A series of raids were carried out at Headhunter properties across the country after its discovery, he says.

Nine Headhunter gang members were arrested in a raid on a Miranda property on Thursday last week.

A further 13 Headhunter members were arrested in Whangarei this morning. Raids were also carried out in the Tasman District, Onehunga, Otahuhu and rural South Auckland, police say.

Mr Good says the Whangarei lab may have been used to supply the South Island methamphetamine market.

“When you have cooks producing $3 million worth of methamphetamine in three days you start to see the size of the problem,” Mr Good said.

He promised to continue to carry out more operations against organized criminal groups supplying methamphetamine.

“In 2015 Police will shut down more clan labs. We will arrest more cooks. We will seize more drugs and restrain more assets and we will target the money behind these organized criminal networks.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://tvnz.co.nz/national-news/bust-mercedes-driving-teens-leads-massive-gang-drugs-haul-6207077

 

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — A Charleston man is facing serious charges after police say he wrecked his car with an 11-month-old baby inside while high on drugs.

Jimmy Bostic is charged with child endangerment, driving under the influence with a minor in the vehicle and possession of controlled substances.

Officers said they found Bostic outside of his wrecked vehicle on MacCorkle Avenue with a woman and the toddler.

Officers said while they were talking with Bostic to find out what happened, a small bag of prescription pills fell out of his clothing.

Officers searched Bostic and said they also found meth and heroin.

Police said Bostic admitted to taking the meth, heroin and one type of the prescription pills.

Bostic is currently out on bond.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.wchstv.com/news/features/eyewitness-news/stories/Man-Accused-Of-Crashing-Car-With-Toddler-Inside-While-High-On-Drugs-63349.shtml#.VI8R5Gs5CUl

 

Two men and a woman face charges in the death of a man whose body was found in a Cheyenne motel room.

A police report says an argument over $20 to pay for methamphetamine sparked a fight on Dec. 7 in which 48-year-old Anthony Hayward of Cheyenne died.

Dagoberto Ontiveros and Joshua E. Bowen each were charged with one count of first-degree murder, punishable by life in prison or death. Kimberly Brewer was charged with a lesser count of accessory after the fact. All are from Cheyenne. A fourth person originally arrested wasn’t charged.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_27137341/three-charged-death-man-over-20-meth?source=infinite

 

Although it’s too soon to say if Regina is experiencing an upswing in crystal meth, a number of recent arrests and seizures show the drug is still very much a part of the city’s drug scene.1212 rcmp drug seizure3.JPG

Sgt. Todd Wall, sergeant in charge of the Regina Integrated Drug Enforcement Street Team (RIDEST), said an investigation into methamphetamine that began between a month and 1½ months ago resulted in searches of six locations and nine arrests over the past couple of weeks.

Six of those people are facing charges specifically related to that drug.

Other drugs were also seized during the searches, as were a number of weapons – including long guns and handguns – and other items. During the 2½ years that Wall has headed up the unit, he said there have been meth seizures, “however, this recent investigation has netted a noteworthy quantity.”

“The last 2½ years, we have seized meth in smaller quantities here and there, so we know that it exists, but these seizures here in the last month, month and a half, have been noteworthy.”

He said it’s hard to say at this point whether the larger amount of meth seized in the course of the recent investigation is a sign that there is truly more of the drug out there or whether it’s simply the result of the way police resources have been deployed.

“When you direct investigative resources to any one crime, you’re more than likely going to get results,” he said.

Wall said cocaine is still the most prevalent drug on Regina streets. That said, crystal meth (a form of methamphetamine) comes with its own set of problems for those who use it and for those tasked with trying to deal with it.

“It’s a highly addictive drug,” he said. “It’s life-altering as far as behavior and also health. Once you get addicted to it, it creates all kinds of health issues throughout the body and is a very highly dependent-type drug where you need to keep fuelling the high that you initially get. It’s a stronger addictive drug to break away from.”

Behaviorally, Wall said users can exhibit psychosis, unpredictability, and even violence, potentially leading to other serious crimes or making it more difficult for police when they have to interact with those users. Also of concern in the recent drug busts were the number of weapons seized at the locations searched, leading to involvement from SWAT in executing the search warrants.

“Any drug investigation, weapons are always a concern to the police,” Wall said. “It’s something we have to deal with when we go to arrest people, whether it’s in their car or it’s in their house. When it comes time for the enforcement part of it, it is a safety concern for ourselves, but it’s also a safety concern for the public.”

There is no indication those arrested during the recent seizures are members of any specific, known organized crime group, although Wall said even less-organized drug circles typically have some form of chain of command.

While RIDEST – and the other units and agencies involved in this recent investigation – have taken a quantity of meth off the streets, Wall said police are well aware there is always more out there.

Police ask that anyone with information about illegal drug activity contact the Regina Police Service at 306-777-6500 (ask for the Drug Info Line), or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.leaderpost.com/news/Drug+seizures+show+crystal+meth+still+problem/10469161/story.html

 

 

ST GEORGE — A St. George man was arrested Thursday after members of the Washington County Drug Task Force found him in possession of heroin and methamphetamine in a motel room.McGrew

Task force detectives were following a vehicle carrying a man with a history of drug possession, task force Detective Travis Hall wrote in a probable cause statement supporting the arrest. The vehicle dropped the man off at Motel 6, located at 205 N. 1000 East in St. George, where he went to Room 119 and met with a man inside. Detectives obtained information from the motel, identifying the man living inside as 47-year-old David McGrew.

After further investigation, it was discovered that McGrew was on probation at the time, Hall said in the statement. Hall contacted Adult Probation and Parole Agent Doug Chambers who confirmed McGrew was currently one of his clients, the statement said.

According to court documents, McGrew is currently on a 36-month probation period after pleading guilty in May to distribution of heroin, a second-degree felony.

Chambers asked Hall to assist him by contacting McGrew and performing a search of his motel room based on his probation agreement, Hall said in the statement. About that time, McGrew was seen leaving the motel room. Task force detectives were able to make contact with McGrew near Denny’s Restaurant on 1000 East and told him they were asked by his probation officer to conduct a search of his room.

Upon searching the room, multiple drug-related items were discovered, Hall said in the statement. These items included a scale and small plastic baggies, where officers found a small brown flake that tested positive for heroin.

“A glass pipe was also located by detectives which had an amount of residue inside,” Hall said in the statement.

The residue was also tested and showed positive results for methamphetamine, the statement said.

McGrew admitted that he would test positive for both heroin and methamphetamine.

When task force detectives told McGrew they were asked to obtain a urine sample from him, McGrew admitted that he would test positive for both heroin and methamphetamine, Hall said in the statement. McGrew said he had used the drugs on Tuesday night.

With a preschool located across the street from Motel 6, McGrew was within 1000-feet of a drug-free zone and the drug charges against him were enhanced by one degree, Hall said in the statement.

McGrew was arrested and booked into the Washington County Purgatory Correctional Facility. He was charged with two second-degree felonies for possession of heroin and methamphetamine, and one class A misdemeanor for possession of drug paraphernalia. McGrew was also placed under a 72-hour hold per the request of his probation officer.

His bail is set at $21,950 cash or bond.

Persons arrested or charged are presumed innocent until found guilty in a court of law or as otherwise decided by a trier-of-fact.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.stgeorgeutah.com/news/archive/2014/12/14/dsc-task-force-arrests-man-living-in-motel-6-for-heroin-methamphetamine-possession/#.VI8NCGs5CUl

 

MELBOURNE – An Australian woman has been arrested in Malaysia — which mandates the death penalty for drug trafficking — after allegedly being caught with 1.5 kilograms (52 oz) of crystal methamphetamine, an official confirmed Saturday.

The woman’s name is yet to be revealed but Australian media reports said she is a 51-year-old mother of four who was arrested in Kuala Lumpur in transit from Shanghai to Melbourne.interphoto_1416209535

Malaysian customs chief Chik Omar Chik Lim confirmed an Australian woman had been arrested in possession of the reported amount of “ice”, but declined to give other details.

He said she was arrested on December 7.

Anyone with at least 50 grams of the drug is considered a trafficker in Muslim-majority Malaysia, which imposes a mandatory sentence of death by hanging upon conviction.

The woman is likely to be officially charged next week but is expected to appear in court Sunday as authorities seek to extend the initial seven-day period of remand for criminal suspects.

Hundreds of people are on death row in Malaysia, many for drug-related offences, though few have been executed in recent years.

Two Australians were hanged in 1986 for heroin trafficking — the first Westerners to be executed in Malaysia — in a case that strained bilateral relations.

Last year, Dominic Bird, a truck driver from Perth, was acquitted on drug trafficking charges after he was allegedly caught with 167 grams of crystal meth.

His lawyers argued that a government chemist had made a mistake when analyzing the substance found on Bird. He was freed and allowed to return home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.interaksyon.com/article/101132/australian-mother-of-4-faces-death-penalty-for-trafficking-1-5-kilos-of-crystal-meth-in-malaysia

 

Two men, one from Chino Valley, face drug and gun charges Dec. 9 after Chino Valley Police made a traffic stop and found ¼-pound bag of methamphetamine wrapped as a Christmas present, two hand guns and a rifle in their rental car. The stop was made at about 8:15 p.m. in the 900 block of North Highway 89.

59844a59844b

Police arrested the driver, James Martinez, 25, of Primghar, Iowa, and the passenger, Michael Brainerd, 31, of Chino Valley, and booked them in the Yavapai County Jail in Cottonwood on felony charges of transportation of a dangerous drug, possession of dangerous drug for sale and weapon offenses.

While on the traffic stop, officers used their K9 police dog, which alerted on the black Toyota passenger car. Officers found the almost ¼-pound of methamphetamine individually packaged, marked and wrapped in gift paper.

In addition, officers also found drug paraphernalia, two semi-automatic hand guns with high-capacity magazines, a semi-automatic rifle and just less than 200 rounds of ammunition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://cvrnews.com/main.asp?SectionID=1&SubSectionID=446&ArticleID=59844

 

THE battle against the drug ice has been dealt a significant blow.

At a time when demand for the drug is skyrocketing, a woman has been found not guilty of murdering a man who was killed when a meth lab exploded inside her house in Ryde.917519-9866d3d0-7a83-11e4-a2c7-3f86b5167618

The charge against Irene Lin was a test case for whether those accused of running dangerous meth labs — often from inside suburban homes — could be held responsible for murdering a person who was killed if the lab exploded.

It failed on December 3 when Justice Peter Hamill SC directed a jury in the NSW Supreme Court to find Lin not guilty of murder and manslaughter of Zhi Min Lan.

Lan died when the drug lab inside the suburban home on Quarry Rd exploded on January 4, 2013.

Justice Hamill told the court that police and fire investigators at the scene did not establish what caused the drug lab to blow up.

This meant it could not be ruled out that Lan killed himself when cooking the drugs, Lin’s lawyers Leo Premutico and Richard Pontello submitted to the court.

A legal source said it was the wrong case for the NSW Director of Public Prosecutions to pursue a murder case on because it lacked the necessary evidence for a conviction.

Crown prosecutor Richard Herps told the court the DPP would appeal.

The murder case was believed to be among the first in Australian history with the court being told similar cases could only be found in the US.

Lin, a nanny and part-time restaurant cleaner, was jailed for at least seven and a half years on Thursday for manufacturing 6.7kg of methamphetamine inside the poorly ventilated house and possessing guns, including a Tech 9 sub-machine gun..

She was charged with murder after Lan was burnt to death when an explosion occurred in the bathroom about 4.40am. It got out of control when they tried to douse it with a mattress.

Police tried to enter the burning house but Lin “immediately rushed to the front door saying ‘no, no, no’ and attempted to close the door”, preventing them from getting to Lam, who was naked and crawling across the floor, the court heard.910422-44c98d84-8272-11e4-a702-553dc58650c9

Inside, police found an explosive combination of chemicals that were being used without any safety precautions or ventilation.

Prosecutors charged Lin with constructive murder, meaning they did not have to prove she intended to kill Lan, inflict grievous bodily harm or act with reckless indifference.

If the charge hadn’t failed, Lin could have been held responsible for Lan’s death because he died in the act of committing a crime with Lin that carries a maximum jail term of 25 years or more.

In this case, the crime was manufacturing a commercial quantity of illegal drugs.

Lin’s lawyers successfully argued she should be found not guilty of murder or and manslaughter.

Justice Hamill told the court it could not be ruled out that Lan killed himself by causing the explosion.

He told the court Lan could not be guilty of his own murder and this meant Lin would not be guilty either.

If Lan did kill himself, Lin may not have foreseen the possibility he could be killed, Justice Hamill told the court.

The judge told the court the charge was not helped by police and fire investigators not establishing who caused the explosion, which started from a gas bottle and burner in the bathroom.

Justice Hamill said the situation “could have been avoided with a better investigation”.

“…The fact is the failure to test the items in the bathroom are a remarkable and significant oversight on the part of the investigators,” he told the court.

Mr Herps told the court the murder case was “an unusual sort of charge”, which Justice Hamill said was “a masterpiece of understatement”.

According to the latest Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research statistics, amphetamine detections by police had risen by 26 per cent over the last quarter.

NSW police figures showed the drug squad had uncovered 88 illegal labs in 2014, 115 in 2013, 98 in 2012, 93 in 2011 and 96 in 2010.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/woman-found-not-guilty-of-murdering-a-man-killed-in-meth-lab-explosion-inside-her-ryde-house/story-fni0cx12-1227154910450?nk=0873458911e76e78f2bc19fcc5d47cfc

 

 

POCATELLO – Authorities have released the autopsy results on the Pocatello sex offender who led police on a high-speed chase in October that ended with him fatally shooting himself and crashing his car into a mobile home.

Bannock County Coroner Kim Quick said the autopsy results confirm that Bryan Seward, 46, died from a single self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head. Quick said toxicology reports determined that Seward had methamphetamine and amphetamines in his system at the time of his death.

What still has not been released is the Idaho State Police report reviewing the Pocatello Police Department’s handling of the chase involving Seward.

The state police report on the chase has been turned over to Bannock County Prosecutor Steve Herzog, who has not yet made the results public.

Pocatello police said that when a Pocatello police officer attempted to pull Seward over on West Center Street on the night of Oct. 4, he brandished a weapon, fired at the officer and drove away. A pursuit ensued with Seward firing at police multiple times from his car, Pocatello police said.

Seward then pulled into a mobile home park on Wilson Avenue, called his step-sister and reportedly told her he wasn’t going back to jail. Police said Seward shot himself in the head before barreling his car into the front of a trailer home owned by Barbara Gehring.

Seward was pronounced dead at the scene. Miraculously no one else was injured during the chase, including the police officers Seward fired at.

Pocatello police officers did not return fire during the pursuit, but because the incident resulted in Seward’s death, an investigation on the conduct of the Pocatello Police Department was performed by the Idaho State Police.

Along with about a dozen traffic violations, including driving under the influence, and a number of theft and fraud charges, Seward’s criminal record included an arrest in November of 2012 for failing to register as a sex offender and on April 14, 2012, he was charged with injury to a child, violating his probation and contempt of court.

In 2000, Seward was charged with trafficking and manufacturing methamphetamine. He was also charged with three counts of lewd conduct with a child under 16 and one count of sexual abuse of a child in Bingham County in 2000.

According to the Idaho State Police Sex Offenders Registry, Seward was listed as being in compliance with registration requirements at the time of his death.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.idahostatejournal.com/members/autopsy-in-on-sex-offender-who-shot-himself-after-police/article_57abfc32-8292-11e4-b75c-6fe1466798ea.html