A traffic stop on Highway 29 in Lake County led to the arrest of a Lakeport man and the seizure of 22.5 grams of methamphetamine found in a hidden compartment inside his pickup, the Lake County Sheriff’s Department said.

Antonio Flores Castellanos, 40, was contacted by the deputy who saw a GMC pickup travel over the fog line and veer back toward the center of the roadway three times in about 400 yards on Thursday night, Lt. Steve Brooks said.

The pickup, which also had an inoperative brake light, was stopped near the intersection of Highway 29 and 11th Street in Lakeport about 8:30 p.m.

The deputy asked Castellanos if he was under the influence of drugs or alcohol, and he replied that he was coming down from methamphetamine and was tired, Brooks said in a press release.

A police dog was called to the scene and indicated a controlled substance near the driver’s side door, Brooks said. Deputies located a hidden compartment containing four plastic bags, each holding a white crystalline substance determined to be methamphetamine. Castellanos said he had only owned the pickup for about four months and was unaware of the hidden compartment or its contents, Brooks said.

Deputies also found $2,766, which Castellanos said he had won at a casino, Brooks said.

Castellanos was arrested on suspicion of several controlled substance violations, and booked at Lake County Jail, with his bail set at $500,000.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.pressdemocrat.com/article/20131221/articles/131229935

 

Written by Fred HAMBURG

The headline for the Dec. 3 “Local Voice” column by Christopher Dixon was “Scare tactics don’t change the facts on pseudo laws.”

I couldn’t agree more. However, the article, itself, is a classic example of trying to prove a conclusion you’re already committed to by distorting truth and misrepresenting data.

Fred Hamburg

Examples of “scare tactics” quoted were a City Council woman’s quote that she “hope(d) it doesn’t take a dead child or family member for us to wake up and realize that we need to pass a law requiring a prescription for pseudoephedrine.” Dixon doesn’t mention that this councilwoman spent more than 20 years in the county prosecutor’s office and is well aware of those consequences truly occurring from fires and explosions in meth labs. Scare tactic? — or realistic possibility?

Dixon then refers to another letter supporting prescription-only legislation, substituting his words “methamphetamine problem” for the author’s words “meth labs.” There is quite a difference between curbing methamphetamine usage and reducing local meth labs. None of the so-called “boogeymen,” as Dixon calls them, have said this law would reduce meth usage, but rather the number of highly dangerous methamphetamine  manufacturing sites — an important distinction.

Public safety is a necessary area for government action. Meth labs are undeniably dangerous to occupants, to individuals nearby, to police and fire fighters and to anyone who comes in contact with them. Cars used as meth labs can catch on fire and explode. “Cookers” can booby-trap meth labs with explosives to make it difficult for law enforcement agents to safely enter. We have no state or local law requiring dwellings used as meth labs to be cleaned of toxic residue before others can occupy them, though they pose serious health-risks. Missouri leads the nation in meth lab “incidents,” and has every year but one since 2003.

More than 70 Missouri communities, including many of our neighbors, have passed prescription-only legislation, but we seem not to be able to do anything statewide or in Springfield. The column parrots a drug company-sponsored “study” showing California having a simultaneous decrease in “incidents” without prescription-only legislation, “proving” that Oregon’s legislation didn’t cause the reduction.  The reason Oregon enacted this legislation was that, although other laws had reduced “incidents,” they were found to be less effective than requiring prescriptions.

So, why do I agree with the column’s title? Because drug company funded “robo-calls” and libertarian “think tanks” do use scare tactics to oppose effective legislation. When I started practicing pediatrics in 1971, prescriptions were required for pseudoephedrine, and patients had no problem or extra expense obtaining these prescriptions. That would also be the case today.

Curtailing meth labs by prescription-only pseudoephedrine legislation is associated with less crime, less danger, less expense and fewer children entering foster care. It’s time for our City Council to do the right thing by passing, not tabling, this legislation.

 

 

 

 

http://www.news-leader.com/article/20131222/OPINIONS02/312220012/voice-of-the-day-meth-labs-Springfield-City-Council?odyssey=nav%7Chead&nclick_check=1

 

 

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration is investigating West Virginia Rite Aid stores and their sales of cold medications used to make methamphetamine in clandestine labs.

“Rite Aid is aware of an investigation and is fully cooperating with the government,” said Ashley Flower, a Rite Aid spokeswoman.

The DEA’s Tactical Diversion Unit recently requested scores of records from the West Virginia Board of Pharmacy dating back to 2006. The electronic records document Rite Aid’s sales of pseudoephedrine, a key meth-making ingredient.

“They asked for historical data. It was a lot of information,” said Mike Goff, a pharmacy board administrator who oversees the state’s controlled-substance monitoring program. “They apparently found some questionable Sudafed sales.”

The DEA requested the Rite Aid sales data last month, after The Charleston Gazette reported that several Rite Aid stores were among the top sellers of pseudoephedrine products in West Virginia. Pseudoephedrine is sold under brand names such as Sudafed and Allegra D.

Rite Aid’s Kanawha City store has sold more than 7,000 boxes of pseudoephedrine this year, the second-highest total in the state, according to an electronic tracking system data. For several months, the Kanawha City Rite Aid was selling six times the number of boxes of pseudoephedrine as a CVS pharmacy in the same neighborhood four blocks away.

The South Charleston Rite Aid ranks fourth in pseudoephedrine sales in West Virginia this year, with more than 6,900 boxes sold.

Rite Aid stores in Belle and on Charleston’s West Side also rank in the top 10. The Cross Lanes Rite Aid had the 11th-highest pseudoephedrine sales total.

Rite Aid, which has 104 stores in West Virginia, sold more 123,500 boxes of pseudoephedrine, more than any other pharmacy in the state this year. Walmart’s 37 stores in West Virginia have sold 104,000 boxes.

Last year, a former Rite Aid pharmacist told a legislative committee that the chain drugstore awarded bonuses to pharmacists in West Virginia based on pseudoephedrine sales. Pharmacists alleged that Rite Aid dedicated specific cash registers for sales of the cold medicine. Rite Aid has denied the allegations.

“Rite Aid does not award bonuses to pharmacists or pharmacy techs based on pseudoephedrine sales,” Flower said. “Rite Aid does provide bonuses to pharmacists based upon overall store performance metrics.”

David Potters, executive director of the state pharmacy board, said DEA agents didn’t disclose what allegations they’re investigating.

“I knew the DEA was looking for some things,” Potters said, “but I don’t know what they’re specifically looking for.”

A DEA spokesman responded to a request for comment but provided no information about the Rite Aid investigation in West Virginia.

Mahantech Corp., a company that works for the pharmacy board, downloaded Rite Aid’s pseudoephedrine sales records — taken from a database called “RxData Track PSE” — onto a data-storage device. The information was handed over to special agents from the DEA’s Charleston field office. The pharmacy board used the Mahantech software to track pseudoephedrine purchases before switching over to a new drug-industry-funded system called the National Precursor Log Exchange, or NPLEx.

In early November, Rite Aid announced that its West Virginia stores had stopped selling cold medications such as Sudafed 12 Hour and Sudafed 24 Hour, which have pseudoephedrine as their only active ingredient. Meth cooks demand the single-ingredient medications because they produce potent methamphetamine without byproducts. Rite Aid stores still stock cold medications, such as Claritin-D, that combine pseudoephedrine with other drugs.

Law enforcement authorities and health advocates praised the company for the decision.

After the change, Rite Aid’s pseudoephedrine sales in West Virginia dropped 37 percent between September and November. Last month’s statewide sales dropped by half, compared to January, according to NPLEx data.

Some Rite Aid pharmacists started addressing the problem before the chain drugstore’s corporate office directive, sales data suggest. In March, for instance, the Rite Aid on Charleston’s East End reported 826 pseudoephedrine transactions — the third-highest-selling store in West Virginia that month. In September, the East End Rite Aid sold 17 boxes, and in October, just 14 boxes.

That particular Rite Aid store then stopped selling pseudoephedrine products, except for Zephrex-D, a tamper-resistant version that can’t be converted to meth.

Rite Aid stores also now limit customers’ pseudoephedrine purchases to one box per visit.

“Rite Aid takes the sale of products containing pseudoephedrine seriously,” Flower said. “We are committed to taking appropriate action to help address the methamphetamine problem in West Virginia.”

 

 

 

http://www.wvgazette.com/News/201312210059

 

 

Two Edwardsville women, arrested recently for keeping methamphetamine at their home in the Ebbets Field subdivision, may also lose their cars to the local drug agency that arrested them.

Kelly A. Thomas, 30, and Kaenin M. Thomas, 34, were living at 3312 Karros Court when  agents with the Metropolitan Enforcement Group of Southwestern Illinois obtained a search warrant for their home and reportedly confiscated about 17 grams of crystal meth found inside.

Eight grams of the drug were found in the bedroom and bathroom that police say Kaenin Thomas shared with her boyfriend, Steven Sweningsen; nine grams was found in the basement bedroom area where they say Kelly Thomas stayed with her boyfriend, Gerald Provencher.

Sweningsen, 42,  and Provencher, 24, are being held at the Madison County Jail on $100,000 bail. They have requested a public defender to represent them.

Kelly and Kaenin Thomas each posted $7,500 cash and were released.

Police began looking into the case after allegedly learning that Sweningsen and Provencher were buying heroin and meth in south St. Louis and bringing it back to Edwardsville.

When Sweningsen was interviewed, he reportedly acknowledged that he had driven Kaenin Thomas’ 2008 Honda Accord several times in the past month to buy the drugs, according to a sworn statement from M.E.G.S.I.

The statement was included in a request for forfeiture that has been filed by the Madison County State’s Attorney’s office. The agency is seeking the Accord under the Illinois Drug Asset Forfeiture Procedure Act, and other acts including the Methamphetamine Control and Community Protection Act.

The forfeiture hearing will be heard by a judge. Such cases often take months, and sometimes years, to resolve.

M.E.G.S.I. is also seeking Kelly Thomas’ 2012 Kia Optima.

Police say that Sweningsen also reportedly told them that he and Provencher took the Optima to south St. Louis to buy heroin and bring it back to Karros Court. “Thomas confirmed that she and Provender use crystal methamphetamine on a regular basis,” Illinois State Special Agent Matt Evers wrote in the sworn statement used to support the forfeiture. “Thomas also confirmed that she is unemployed and that her parents pay all her bills.”

Kelly and Kaenin Thomas face preliminary hearings at 1 p.m. on Dec. 19. Provencher and Sweningsen face preliminary hearings the following day.

 

 

 

 

http://www.theintelligencer.com/local_news/article_f9d53e94-6a4f-11e3-942f-001a4bcf887a.html

 

After years of being addicted to methamphetamine, Victorene “Vicki” Hampton-Tubridy is celebrating the holidays with her family, including her 11-month-old son, Ayden, the child she nearly lost because of her addiction.

She and her children are planning to have Christmas with other family members at her mom’s house in American Canyon. It will be a celebration after months of uncertainty, struggles and at times despair.

5282b15c5fe7c_preview-620NAPA, CA – Victorene Hampton-Tubridy was addicted to methamphetamines for 20 years and lived along the banks of the Napa River near Trancas Street for a couple of years starting in 2003. She would jump over the guard rail she is sitting on to get to her campsite. She has the feet of her youngest child and his birthdate tattooed on her chest. The date is also her clean date, the last day she used drugs. She has been clean for nearly 10 months

 

A few days after using methamphetamine on her 37th birthday last January, Hampton-Tubridy gave birth to Ayden, her sixth child, at Queen of the Valley Medical Center. She had relapsed after being clean for 18 months.

Ayden was born prematurely, at 32 weeks. He weighed 4 pounds, 6 ounces.

“We both tested positive for methamphetamine,” Hampton-Tubridy said.

Before she went home, a Napa County social worker came to visit her at the hospital where Ayden was expected to remain for weeks. “She said, ‘You can’t take your baby home,’” Hampton-Tubridy recalled.

Ayden would be placed in foster care and eventually adopted, she remembers hearing. She might never see him again. Her mother, who had become guardian of her other children over the years, would not be able to help her out this time.

“It was unbelievable,” said Hampton-Tubridy, struggling to explain how the prospect of losing custody of her baby boy deeply touched her soul.  “I don’t think that I can ever explain it.”

“I sat in my bed for two days and really thought and thought and thought and thought — what can I do, what can I do? I can’t allow this to happen to me and to my children. It all came to me.”

She had to leave Ayden behind at the hospital (he would remain there for more than a month). “It was a horrible experience. I knew then that I had a problem that I couldn’t fix on my own,” Hampton-Tubridy said. “I mean, I always knew I had a problem — I didn’t think it was that serious.”

The day she left the hospital, Hampton-Tubridy asked her mother to take her to the Napa County Mental Health offices on Old Sonoma Road to seek help. She was determined to regain full custody of her son.

In the meantime, two children who lived with her in south Napa moved in with her mother in American Canyon, where her eldest child also lives. A teenage son lives with her brother, while another teen boy lives in a group home.

After an assessment, Hampton-Tubridy was enrolled in Napa County’s adult outpatient treatment program, where she followed all the suggestions she was given, she said. She underwent daily sessions, including group drug counseling, therapy and Narcotics Anonymous meetings as she started court proceedings to regain custody of her baby son.

“I had to jump with both feet and get on the winning side,” Hampton-Tubridy said.

She had to cut ties with addicted friends she had met over the years — men and women who could lead her down the bad road again.

She learned to say “Hi!” but kept moving whenever she ran into them in Napa. “And that was hard to do,” she said.

Hampton-Tubridy, who said she also suffers from bipolar disorder and anxiety, had to become honest with herself, get rid of resentments and regrets, and share her story with others.

“It hurts, you know, and it’s embarrassing and it’s humiliating,” she said. “It’s like a cleansing process.”

One of four children, Hampton-Tubridy never finished high school. Growing up in Rohnert Park and later in Napa, she always felt different from her peers and never fit in. Learning was difficult. At 16, a boyfriend introduced her to methamphetamine. And for the first time, she said, she felt fulfilled. “It was amazing to me.”

It was also addicting. “It was an amazing feeling because I felt so different and so yucky my whole life that it felt amazing to me. And that’s what attracted me to it and that’s what kept me searching for it and searching for it and searching for it and doing it and doing it.”

She became defiant, disrespectful. “She was mean. Just plain mean,” remembered her mother, Victorene Chase.

Hampton-Tubridy stayed with men to feed her habit. She had babies with them as they supplied her with methamphetamine. Her oldest child, Ana Castro, is now 19.

Hampton-Tubridy was arrested and jailed for a variety of offenses, including drug possession, being under the influence and driving on a suspended driver’s license. In 2010, she was jailed in Solano County for stealing two cars she planned to sell for drugs.

Over the years, she underwent inpatient and outpatient treatment in Napa, Vallejo and Benicia. But it was all for the wrong reasons, she said. “That was my get-out-of-jail card.” she said. “I did it for the wrong reasons.”

Her mother raised her children as Hampton-Tubridy struggled with her addiction. Hampton-Tubridy lived in homeless camps along the Napa River when she could not stay clean and stay with her mother. “She’d stay away for days at a time,” her mother said.

Now 70, Chase recalled bailing her daughter out of Juvenile Hall and jail multiple times.

That was a mistake that hindered her daughter’s chances to get clean, she now believes.

“I did everything I could possibly do and then some,” said Chase, who lost her husband two decades ago. “I didn’t want to accept she had a problem.”

“The kids always came first in my life,” said Chase, who worked as a waitress and cosmetologist to support the family. “They were my life. My kids come first. And that included my grandkids. I did everything I could for them.”

Chase was all smiles in November as she snapped photos of Hampton-Tubridy and Ayden after her daughter graduated from Napa County’s outpatient treatment program on Old Sonoma Road. Ayden’s foster mom was also there, smiling.

Months into the journey, Hampton-Tubridy, who is on disability, continues to attend group therapy and NA meetings. She is now on Step 4.

She touches base weekly with her sponsor by texting her or calling her.

They meet in person every other week.

In November, Hampton-Tubridy started working a part-time job for Goodwill in Napa. She now works the retail floor up to four times a week.

After being allowed to see Ayden under supervision, then a few hours three times a week over a period of months, Hampton-Tubridy was able to regain custody of Ayden in early December on a trial basis. A hearing to award permanent custody is set for January.

Chase said she is proud of her daughter’s ability to battle her addiction. So is her eldest child, a Napa Valley College student. “I just hope that my mom can be a mom again,” Ana Castro said.

 

 

 

 

 

http://napavalleyregister.com/news/local/overcoming-meth-a-mom-celebrates-christmas-with-kids/article_f5ad45bc-6a9c-11e3-95ae-0019bb2963f4.html

 

 

For years, methamphetamine has been the second most common illegal drug after marijuana, according to the Napa Special Investigations Bureau, which focuses on drug enforcement.

Known as speed, crank, crystal or ice, methamphetamine is imported from neighboring counties and the Central Valley and as far south as Los Angeles. A batch of methamphetamine is also easily manufactured locally with chemicals and precursors found in groceries and hardware stores, said Napa Police Lt. Gary Pitkin, who heads the countywide drug law enforcement unit.

“Methamphetamine is a huge problem in our community,” said Pitkin. “It’s all over.”

Napa County Chief Probation Officer Mary Butler estimates 75 percent of all probationers have a substance abuse issue. The most popular drugs are methamphetamine and marijuana.

“Both are easy to get and cheap. The big problem with meth is that it is very addictive. So once someone starts using it, often it is difficult to stop and their life spirals out of control,” Butler said in an email.

A lot of the methamphetamine users are dealers who support their drug habit with sales, Pitkin said. Methamphetamine on the street goes for $60 to $80 a gram, about the same as cocaine, he said.

“Methamphetamine continues to dominate NSIB’s resources and investigative time,” according to the bureau’s 2012 report, the most recent available.

In 2012, NSIB agents made 55 methamphetamine-related arrests and purchased 424 grams of methamphetamine. Officers seized 5.9 kilograms of methamphetamine — 13 pounds — with a street value of about $471,800, the bureau stated in its annual report.

Some of the major methamphetamine seizures in 2012 appear to have had connections with “sophisticated criminal drug trafficking organizations,” according to NSIB.

Drug agents seized more marijuana than any other drug in 2012. NSIB reported confiscating $49 million worth of marijuana, busting some large grow operations.

Agents made 37 marijuana-related arrests in 2012.

Methamphetamine became popular in the 1980s as a cheap alternative to cocaine, said Jim Featherstone, who retired as assistant director of Napa County Health and Human Services in 2011 after more than 30 years of service. “You don’t have to go to Colombia to get it,” he said.

People who use even a small amount of methamphetamine may experience a host of physical effects, including rapid heart rate and increased blood pressure and wakefulness, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s website. Judgment and inhibitions are altered.

Long-term abusers experience a host of effects, including weight loss, teeth loss, insomnia and violent behavior. Chronic methamphetamine use also leads to paranoia and hallucinations. Scans show brains that produce less neurotransmitters, leading abusers to feel depressed and prompting them to take even more drugs, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Of the 1,300 clients who received mental health services through county-related programs in 2012, 41 percent were admitted for alcohol addiction and 30 percent for methamphetamine addiction, said Featherstone, now a consultant at Napa County’s Alcohol and Drug Services.

Napa, Marin and Sonoma counties show similar drug-use patterns. “In a rural environment, you think sometimes you can escape from those kind of plagues, but we don’t,” Featherstone said.

According to national statistics, about 8.4 percent of the population suffers from problems related to drugs and alcohol, Featherstone said. That would translate to 11,500 people in Napa County.

Yet only 1,300 people were in Alcohol and Drug Services programs, Featherstone noted. “There is a little more work to do. We’re not serving everybody who needs to be served. Or they’re not seeking services,” he said.

About half of all adult drug and alcohol programs paid by Napa County are contracted to private providers. As of late November, Alcohol and Drug Services employed 28 people and contracted with 16 providers for services.

Staff from Clinic Ole, the nonprofit organization that provides health care services to primarily low-income people, see people with addictions at county facilities on Old Sonoma Road.

While some people manage to recover “cold turkey,” others have to be placed either in an outpatient or residential program.

It’s not easy to quit, Featherstone said. Drugs and alcohol are prevalent in today’s society. There is not a birthday, holiday, anniversary or family event that does not involve alcohol, Featherstone said.

“When you are in early recovery, that is really hard on you. You need a lot of support around you when you’re put back into society.”

Napa County’s Alcohol and Drug Services’ outpatient treatment program can handle up to 120 men and women. Residential treatment at McAlister Institute Inc. on the campus at Napa State Hospital has a capacity of 25, usually with a waiting list of five to 12 people.

The alcohol and drug division operates on $4.7 million a year, including $2.2 million from Napa County and another $1.15 million in state and federal funds.

Drug treatment for youths are provided at the Wolfe Center, a nonprofit organization based on First Street. There is no direct public funding for youth drug treatment, a fact that Featherstone calls a “national tragedy.”

“If you’re experimenting with drugs before 21, it affects your brain dramatically,” Featherstone said of both alcohol and drugs. “It used to be, ‘Who cares? They’re kids. They can have a drink.’ It’s not OK. It affects their brains.”

 

 

 

 

 

http://napavalleyregister.com/news/local/the-scourge-of-meth/article_ee10cac6-6a9d-11e3-a8c9-0019bb2963f4.html

 

An Easton woman has been charged with endangering the welfare of her baby daughter because the two of them spent time at a Bethlehem Township property that housed a methamphetamine lab, court records say.

At times, the woman apparently left the baby alone while she smoked meth, the records say.

The charge against Betty Jane Stonewall, 29, of 378 W. Nesquehoning St. on the city’s South Side is tied to an early-morning raid at 1450 Sixth St. in the township on Sept. 25. Three other people have been charged in the case.

Stonewall and her daughter were at the property at the time of the 6am raid carried out by township police and state police’s Clandestine Laboratory Team.

At the time of the raid, the little girl was two days short of being 5 months old.

The suspected meth lab was in a pool shed. There is also a house on the property.

A criminal complaint filed by township Sgt. Richard Blake describes how a woman — not Stonewall — and her five children were living at the house. The property is owned by a trust fund in the name of one of the woman’s children who is “severely disabled — mentally and physically.”

The woman “had actual physical control of the property in order to provide care and shelter” for the disabled child, the complaint says.

The woman told police that Stonewall and her daughter had been at the house at least three times and each time they stayed for two to three days.

She said Stonewall would smoke meth in the woman’s bedroom closet or in the shed. “When she smoked in the closet, she would leave [the baby] on her carrier seat in the bedroom, and when she smoked in the pool shed, she would leave [the baby] in the house with someone else,” the woman said.

The woman also said Stonewall “only came to the house to get or smoke methamphetamine.”

During the raid, police found a glassine smoking pipe with residue testing positive for meth on a closet shelf in the woman’s bedroom, the complaint says.

The woman and a man described as the woman’s “self-admitted boyfriend” told police they were using meth. The woman said she started using the drug about two months before the raid “due to the stress in her life that she couldn’t deal with.”

The boyfriend said he was aware that two of the other three people charged in the case were making meth in the shed. He said production occurred 10 to 15 times and that “they almost blew up the pool shed several times.”

The woman and her boyfriend apparently were not charged in the case, court records indicate.

Stonewall was arraigned Thursday by District Judge Joseph Barner of Lower Nazareth Township on a charge of endangering the welfare of children. She was released on $7,500 unsecured bail.

The court file does not say if Stonewall’s daughter is still with her or was taken from her.

Here is some information on the other three people charged in the case:

Thomas Dee Stocker, 28, found inside the shed during the raid. He admitted to police that he was making meth in the shed, according to information in Stonewall’s criminal complaint. He waived all six charges — including three felony counts — against him at a Nov. 25 preliminary hearing before Barner, online records say. Stocker, who told police he was living in the shed but is listed as having an Easton address, remains in Northampton County Prison in lieu of $85,000 bail.

Dawn Marie Stocker, 52, identified in a previous Patch story as living at the Sixth Street property, also waived charges at a Nov. 25 preliminary hearing before Barner. Unlike Thomas Stocker, she’s facing only two charges — drug possession and possession of drug paraphernalia. She remains in county prison in lieu of $7,500 bail. Court records do not explain how Thomas Stocker and Dawn Marie Stocker are related, according to a previous Patch story.

Kia Feflie, 20, of Easton, is facing the same six charges as Thomas Stocker. The boyfriend of the woman with the five children identified the two people suspected of making meth in the shed as Feflie and Thomas Stocker. She too waived the charges at a Nov. 25 preliminary hearing before Barner. She was freed from county prison after posting $10,000 bail on Nov. 18, the online records say.

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://easton.patch.com/groups/police-and-fire/p/police-easton-woman-using-meth-endangered-baby-daughter

 

A Fort Collins woman was arrested this week after police found 1.25 pounds of methamphetamine and $10,000 cash in her apartment, according to a multi-agency drug task force.

Raynette Elizabeth Perez, 47, remains in Larimer County Jail on felony drug charges with bond set at $75,000.

Raynette Perez

Police served a warrant Dec. 17 at her residence on the 3600 block of Windmill Drive near the intersection of Shields Street and Horsetooth Road. The case was the result of a short-term investigation and isn’t connected with other recent arrests involving a regional meth ring, Commander Greg Yeager with the Northern Colorado Drug Task Force said.

Yeager said drug-distribution supplies were also found at the scene. Meth in this area tends to sell from its primary source for $10,000 to $12,000 per pound before it’s cut and sold for $1,200 to $1,600 per ounce, he said.

 

 

 

 

http://www.coloradoan.com/article/20131220/NEWS01/312200066/Police-find-1-25-pounds-meth-10K-Fort-Collins-apartment-arrest-resident?nclick_check=1

 

 

A 32-year-old Carson City woman was arrested Thursday on suspicion of two felony drug counts.

According to her arrest report:

Tashina Wungnema agreed to sell a confidential informant $40 worth of methamphetamine about 8 p.m. Dec. 5. The informant was given money and a recording device and met Wungnema near North Edmonds and Gordon Street. Wungnema took the money and left to get the meth, then brought it to the informant. Deputies stopped her and her driver as they drove away, arresting Wungnema on suspicion of sale of a controlled substance and possession of a controlled substance.

Wungnema agreed to serve as a confidential informant for the Carson City Sheriff’s Office. She was released pending further investigation after she provided information about drug activity in the area.

Wungnema failed to make scheduled purchases of meth and eventually stopped communicating with the Sheriff’s Office. She was arrested again at her mother’s house at 8:48 p.m. Thursday on a violation-of-a-suspended-sentence warrant.

Total bail was set at $23,500.

 

 

 

 

http://www.nevadaappeal.com/news/9432622-113/wungnema-informant-arrested-carson

 

 

RICHMOND — Madison County Sheriff’s deputies who checked on a home incarceration inmate Thursday morning made three arrests after finding an alleged meth lab in the man’s residence.

According to a sheriff’s office news release, Home Incarceration Agent Josh Aldridge went to the Red Lick Road residence of David Satterfield to conduct a home check and drug test. As Aldridge entered the residence, the release stated, a woman exited the house by jumping out the bathroom window and fled the area on foot.

While searching the residence, Aldridge found several items used to manufacture methamphetamine, the release stated. At that point, Aldridge and Satterfield exited the house and contacted the sheriff’s office for assistance.

Two sergeants from the office responded and conducted an investigation of the property, which they said revealed a one-step meth lab in an outside shed. Other drug paraphernalia items were also located on the property, according to the report.

Satterfield was charged with manufacturing methamphetamine as well as violating the terms of his home incarceration.

The deputies said they located the woman at the residence next door and arrested her after they discovered she had four outstanding warrants for failure to appear in court.

Officers searching the woman at the Madison County Detention Center found a substance suspected to be methamphetamine on her person, the report stated, and charges of methamphetamine possession, promoting contraband and tampering with physical evidence are pending against her.

A third individual at the residence was arrested on the strength of a misdemeanor warrant. All three were lodged in the detention center, where they remained Thursday evening, according to the jail’s online records.

 

 

 

 

http://www.richmondregister.com/localnews/x1353067247/Sheriff-s-deputies-find-meth-lab-during-home-incarceration-check

 

Local meth ordinances requiring a prescription to purchase drugs containing pseudoephedrine remain in effect in local municipalities, following a recent opinion from Tennessee Attorney General Robert Cooper that the city ordinances violate state law.

Local meth ordinances require a prescription for the purchase of pseudoephedrine-containing drugs.

Local meth ordinances require a prescription for the purchase of pseudoephedrine-containing drugs.

Winchester Police Chief Dennis Young says the numbers don’t lie — the ordinances requiring a prescription work.

“The ordinance has been successful,” he said. “With the passage of these ordinances, communities across this state experienced a 40 percent to 70 percent, reduction in meth labs, reduction in crime rates, 100 percent reduction in the criminal enterprise known as smurfing, and more importantly a reduction in the number of children being placed into foster care.”

Despite Cooper’s opinion, a growing number of Tennesseans seem to agree with Young that something needs to be done to combat meth with many in favor of requiring a prescription for pseudoephedrine-containing drugs.

According to a recent Vanderbilt University poll, 65 percent of 860 registered voters would accept prescriptions to fight meth production. These unexpected results have some lawmakers rethinking their stance on the issue.

In the past Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey has been a staunch opponent of requiring a prescription for pseudoephedrine-containing drugs, but he may be softening his stance.

Regarding the Vanderbilt poll results, Ramsey has said, “That’s amazing to me, really. That makes me feel better, because I have evolved on this issue, from thinking why should 99 percent of the people be punished for the one percent that abuse it?”

Ramsey says he recognizes the meth problem in Tennessee and although he hasn’t made up his mind on the prescription only issue, he’s grown more open to the possibility of requiring a prescription for cold medicines containing pseudoephedrine.

Young is encouraged by the poll findings and the shift in Ramsey’s thinking.

“The Vanderbilt University poll, just released this week showing a 65 percent support of registered voters, reaffirms the fact that approximately 85 percent of Tennesseans do not purchase cold and allergy products containing pseudoephedrine/ephedrine,” he said. “So, the independent and unbiased poll by Vanderbilt is very helpful in our cause, it sends a strong message to the legislature, and Lt. Gov. Ramsey’s recent comments are very encouraging, as he is known as a mover in the state Legislature.”

Local and state law enforcement have pushed for years for a state law requiring a prescription for drugs such as Sudafed that contain pseudoephedrine, a key ingredient in the production of meth.

They have had little success in getting a state law pushed through, due to stiff opposition from pharmaceutical companies and organizations such as the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.

Law enforcement agencies and local municipalities say the war is far from over, and they will continue to battle meth in their districts by any means possible.

The long-time advocates of making pseudoephedrine-containing products prescription-only may be gaining momentum and supporters with data collected by municipalities enacting ordinances and support from voters.

U.S. Rep. Scott DesJarlais, who heads Tennessee’s Fourth Congressional District and is a physician, said this week that he would support a law requiring a prescription for the purchase of drugs containing pseudoephedrine.

DesJarlais said he does not favor these types of drugs and believes there are better alternatives for people. He said research shows that only a small percentage of Tennesseans use pseudoephedrine drugs to treat symptoms, and few would be impacted by a law making them available through prescription only.

DesJarlais met with local law enforcement on Tuesday to discuss the possibility of getting a state law passed banning the sale of pseudoephedrine drugs without a prescription. He said he plans to meet with Daryl Issa, Chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, to discuss the possibility of a field hearing on the matter.

Young said the meeting with DesJarlais is just one step in the continued fight to protect his community from the ravages of meth.

“We met with Congressman DesJarlais for the purpose of communicating the impact of dealing with the national epidemic on a local level, along with the state of methamphetamine production in our community and state of Tennessee,” he said. “As a doctor, he understands our concerns, as does the overwhelming majority of the medical professionals in our state and nation.”

Young said the new Vanderbilt poll and support from lawmakers reflects what they have seen in every community they have visited in this state.

“They want this madness to stop,” he said. “The silent majority has been silent to long in this state, and the Vanderbilt poll truly reflects what we have experienced over the last seven months as we have traveled across this state.”

Local officials stand by their Stop Meth campaign and say they will continue to fight the meth epidemic on a local and state level.

“As law enforcement we have seen the positive change, but more importantly the community has felt the difference and know we, together, have made a difference as a community,” Young said. “This is our community and we live here. As a citizen of this community and chief of police, it my duty to protect the citizens of my city, therefore I do not have the luxury of choice.

“I must and will continue to fight for the public safety of my citizens. This campaign and the effort of this campaign is not dead, it has just begun.”

 

 

 

 

http://www.heraldchronicle.com/?p=11648

 

The mother of a 2-year-old toddler who tested positive for methamphetamine was behind bars Friday night.

Stephanie Diane Motes, 39, joined her husband, Wayne Michael Motes, in the Baxter County jail on a charge of introducing a controlled substance into another person. Each is being held on $15,000 bond.

Stephanie Motes

In addition, Stephanie Motes faces drug charges as well. On Thursday, Sheriff John Montgomery placed the woman on his department’s “Most Wanted” list with an outstanding warrant for delivery of a Schedule I or II controlled substance. The jail’s website did not list that as a charge. According to the website, she was arrested shortly after 5 p.m. Friday.

Stephanie Motes had been sought by Mountain Home police after tests on her son, who was placed in the custody of the Department of Human Services after a Nov. 3 incident, returned positive for meth. The child was found covered beneath blankets on a couch after a search by police who were responding to a domestic disturbance at a Mountain Home residence.

Both Wayne and Stephanie Motes were arrested on drug and paraphernalia charges as well as endangering the welfare of a minor after police found several syringes, a plastic bag with 100 assorted pills and a marijuana pipe in the bedroom where the couple and toddler slept. She also was charged with obstructing governmental operations for denying Wayne Motes was in the residence.

The sheriff’s office listed Stephanie Motes as being a Springfield, Mo., resident. Wayne Motes is listed as a Gamaliel resident. Both had been staying at the house in Mountain Home at the time of their initial arrests.

 

 

 

 

http://www.baxterbulletin.com/article/20131221/NEWS01/312210014/Mom-meth-baby-case-jail?nclick_check=1

 

 

PADUCAH, KY (KFVS) – Deputies say a Paducah woman is facing additional drug charges after missing a court appearance.

According to McCracken County deputies, 34-year-old Christa Ballard was scheduled to appear in McCracken County Circuit Court for an arraignment stemming from driving under the influence, methamphetamine trafficking and a number of other drug charges.

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Deputies say a warrant was issued for Ballard after she failed to appear for the arraignment.

On Thursday, detectives found Ballard at her home on Westside Drive.

Ballard was placed under arrest for the warrant.

During that time, detectives say they found a number of methamphetamine smoking pipes, a small amount of methamphetamine and syringes.

Ballard was booked into the McCracken County Jail with the additional charges of possession of methamphetamine 3rd or greater offense and possession of drug paraphernalia.

 

 

 

http://www.kfvs12.com/story/24273005/paducah-woman-facing-additional-drug-charges-after-missing-court-date

 

 

BANGOR TOWNSHIP, MI — Prescription drugs, an active methamphetamine lab, and other drug-related items were found Thursday when officers from the Van Buren County Sheriff’s Office searched a home in the 65000 Block of County Road 372.

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An active methamphetamine lab and components were found

The man, 27, and woman, 26, who were at the home have not been arrested on drug-related charges, but authorities expect to bring charges later, according to a news release from the Van Buren County Sheriff’s Office. The woman was arrested on an outstanding warrant, the news release said.

 

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Prescription pills were found, too

It began when officers from the county’s narcotics unit  were able to obtain a search warrant for the residence, which they executed at approximately 3 p.m. Dec. 19.

A search of the residence turned up a small amount of marijuana and methamphetamine; an active methamphetamine lab and other components to manufacture methamphetamine, and a large amount of prescription pills that were not prescribed to either person.

A report will be sent to the Van Buren County prosecutor’s office for review, authorities said.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.mlive.com/news/kalamazoo/index.ssf/2013/12/pills_and_meth_found_in_bangor.html

 

Methamphetamine continues to be a significant problem facing our community. It strains the resources of law enforcement. It drains the pocketbook of property owners who must clean it up. But far more importantly, it devastates families and communities.

We took an important step forward this week in the fight against this scourge. State Attorney General Bob Cooper told cities that they cannot legally require a prescription for products that contain pseudoephedrine, which is sometimes used to make meth.

 The authority, he said, rests with the state.

That puts the focus in the fight back where it belongs: stopping meth cooks at the sales counter when they try to buy more pseudoephedrine (PSE) products than the law allows. The State of Tennessee has an effective electronic system to do just that.

Known as NPLEx (National Precursor Log Exchange), the system blocks meth cooks and smurfers—individuals who illegally buy PSE products on behalf of meth cooks— by requiring an ID and alerting the pharmacy immediately if the buyer has exceeded the legal limit. Just as important, it lets law enforcement know who the meth cooks are.

What it does not do is punish innocent consumers by preventing them from buying popular cold, flu and allergy medicines they need.

A number of well-intentioned policymakers at the state and local level believe that requiring a prescription for PSE products will make a difference in the battle against meth production.  It will – but not the kind of difference they want.

For one thing, it would unfairly burden law-abiding citizens. Families would have to bear the expense of a doctor visit and a prescription, just for basic treatment for a cold or for the allergies that are so prevalent here. It would hit seniors especially hard, causing some to simply forego taking anything. At an advanced age, that can be particularly dangerous.

Moreover, in states where PSE prescription laws have been passed, use of meth has not declined. Instead, Mexican drug cartels have moved in with even more deadly forms of meth and business is booming.

“Meth use is as prominent as it always has been,” Hinds County (Mississippi) Sheriff Crieg Oster said in a recent news account. Mississippi is one of two states where PSE products require a prescription. “We’re seeing the higher grade of meth coming from Mexico.”

Police say 69 cartels are supplying nearly every ounce of meth in Oregon, the only other state with a prescription-only law. These are business-savvy money-makers who don’t depend on cold and allergy pills from the local drugstore and won’t be fazed by such a law. Nationwide, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration says they control over 80 percent of the meth market.
So, let’s take a smarter route in Tennessee. Instead of passing any law to punish consumers, we should focus our efforts on making better use of the system we have. A tool like NPLEx works best when it is used diligently and universally. We need to makes sure that is happening.

That is where we can do the most good against the meth makers in our midst.

Rep. Eric Watson

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.chattanoogan.com/2013/12/20/266044/Tennessee-Should-Not-Go-The-Way-Of.aspx

 

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo.— State Senator David Sater, R-Cassville, announced today that he has prefiled Senate Bill 625. This is an anti-meth bill aimed at helping Missouri fight methamphetamine production. The bill authored by the senator and co-sponsored by Senator Brian Munzlinger, R-Williamstown, would place limits on pseudoephedrine sales in order to deter methamphetamine production.

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This bill would not affect law-abiding citizens that require the medication. This bill would prevent returns of pseudoephedrine-based products from retailers and block people who have been found guilty of a drug felony offense from purchasing these medications without a prescription.

Senator Sater said in a press release today: “Senate Bill 625 is a comprehensive and balanced approach to tackling Missouri’s meth problem. We are preventing meth cooks from acquiring the ingredients they need to produce this devastating drug and, by establishing a drug offender registry, we are preventing dangerous, repeat criminals from breaking the law and putting our communities at risk.”

This bill would lower the monthly and yearly limits of pseudoephedrine that an individual can purchase and possess, and would allow pharmacists to refuse sale of pseudoephedrine products to anyone at their discretion.

 

 

 

 

http://www.ozarksfirst.com/story/proposed-anti-meth-bill-would-limit-pseudoephedrin/d/story/gZkbdmzkDkWSp8CjtbX70Q

 

 

A woman stopped for a bicycle violation in West Sacramento is in jail after she allegedly was found to be in possession of methamphetamine.

A Yolo County Sheriff’s deputy stopped the bicyclist on southbound Sixth Street about 8:43 p.m. Thursday. The woman told the deputy that she was on probation in Yolo County for receiving stolen property, and a subsequent search revealed that she had 0.14 grams of methamphetamine, according to a Sheriff’s Office news release.

Victoria Quintalla Ramos, 24, of West Sacramento was arrested on suspicion of possession of a controlled substance, possession of controlled-substance paraphernalia and a probation violation. She was booked into Yolo County Jail with bail set at $90,000.

NEW CASTLE, Delaware — New Castle County Police have charged a couple with drug and gun offenses after they say methamphetamines, PCP and several firearms were found in their New Castle home.

Officers searched the home on Wednesday and say they recovered seven firearms, including a sawed off shotgun, 1.8 grams of methamphetamine, 2.8 grams of PCP, pills and drug paraphernalia.

Forty-five-year-old Richard Paynter has been charged with numerous gun and drug offenses. His wife, 47-year-old Connie Paynter, has been charged with drug possession offenses and conspiracy.

 

 

 

 

http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/8a6e226c6b544ce6820a2ce2a9dd0547/DE–Drug-Charges

 

 

Nebraska City – Authorities arrested a Nebraska City couple and seized two ounces of methamphetamine after conducting an early morning search at the Applewood Trailer Park today.

Roberto Lopez Biviano, 30, and Cynthia Wichman-Jimenez, 31, were taken into custody for suspicion of possession of methamphetamine with intent to deliver.

Nebraska City trailer house

The suspected methamphetamine was packaged in a two-ounce bundle. Meth is reportedly sold at $25 for quarter gram, giving two ounces a street value of $5,600.

Chief Deputy Mike Holland of the Otoe County Sheriff’s Office said excellent footwork by sheriff’s deputies produced enough evidence to obtain the search warrant.

“For here, two ounces of meth is a fairly significant amount of drugs, and anytime we can get a significant amount of drugs off the streets in Otoe County we are very pleased,” he said.

Deputies and members of the countywide tactical team including Nebraska City police conducted the raid before sunrise today. Holland said the arrests were made without incident.

Nebraska City Police Captain Lonnie Neeman said officers also seized about two pickup truck loads of tools, electronics and other items that may be stolen property.

One of the items, a Moped, had been stolen previously and recovered by police only to be stolen a second time.

 

 

 

 

http://www.journaldemocrat.com/article/20131220/NEWS/131229995/-1/News

 

A Sun Prairie man was arrested Wednesday for allegedly manufacturing methamphetamine in his apartment.

Brandon Fletcher, 22, was taken into custody at his apartment building at 205 S. Bird St., according to a news release from the Sun Prairie Police Department.

“He was found to be in possession of all necessary materials to manufacture methamphetamine,” said Sgt. Jamie Peterson.

The materials, which can be highly dangerous, were removed from the apartment.

“The scene is safe and there is no danger to the surrounding residences or the community,” Peterson said in the release.

Officers were assisted by the Wisconsin Division of Criminal Investigations and the Dane County Narcotics and Gang Task Force.

 

 

 

 

http://host.madison.com/news/local/crime_and_courts/meth-lab-found-in-sun-prairie-apartment-resident-arrested/article_be4e161e-7c0b-5cce-9408-c261d743b50d.html

 

 

FORSYTH — A Branson woman is in Taney County Jail after reportedly selling methamphetamine several times to undercover officers.

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Nicole A. Blas, 35, has been charged with three counts of selling a controlled substance. According to Taney County court documents, undercover officers with the Missouri State Highway Patrol and the Combined Ozarks Multi-Jurisdictional Enforcement Team, set up three different operations — on Nov. 22, Dec. 4 and Dec. 12 — in which a confidential informant was able to arrange meetings with Blas and then purchase meth from her.

 

 

 

 

 

http://bransontrilakesnews.com/news/article_1a9288d8-69b2-11e3-b98d-001a4bcf887a.html

 

Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott said the number of methamphetamine labs found in Richland County has increased this year and issued a warning to the community and specifically to hotel owners.

The warning poster to be used at meth lab locations (photo provided)

The warning poster to be used at meth lab locations

 

Lott said deputies, fire marshals and emergency services personnel will begin labeling locations where clandestine labs have been found in order to warn the community of the dangers of being near such labs.

Lott said seven labs were found in Richland County in 2011, 15 were found in 2012 and 23 have been busted so far in 2013. Twelve of the 45 labs over that period were found in hotels. Lott said it’s possible hotel staff members sometimes clean up abandoned meth labs without realizing what they’re doing.

Lott said his department is working to make everyone in the community aware that exposure to the ingredients used to create meth can cause severe illness or death.

The chemicals also pose a danger or fire or explosion. Lott said the ingredients not only are dangerous during manufacturing of the drug but also after the lab chemicals are abandoned.

The Sheriff’s Department is working closely with the Richland County Fire Marshal’s Office and Richland County Emergency Services Division to remind residents and business owners and employees of the importance of reporting any suspicious activity, labs or chemicals found in hotel rooms, apartments, cars, homes, woods or fields.

Lott asked anyone with information about illegal activity to contact Crimestoppers.

 

 

 

http://coladaily.com/2013/12/20/sheriff-issues-warning-as-meth-labs-on-rise-in-richland-county/

 

(KMOV) – A 43-year-old Granite City woman faces charges after deputies say she smuggled methamphetamine into the Madison County Jail on Dec. 9.

Tammy Shaver was charged Thursday with bringing contraband into a penal institution and unlawful possession of less than five grams of meth.

meth_smugglers_121913

According to deputies, Shaver was arrested Dec. 8 after authorities found a weapon and three codeine tablets in her possession when they responded to a domestic dispute call at a home in the 4300 block of Ill. Route 162.

She was arrested and taken to the Madison County Jail.

Deputies say the next day guards found meth in her cell and determined she had smuggled it in.

She remains in custody on $40,000 bail.

In a separate case, 35-year-old Kristy Payne was found with meth inside her cell after being arrested Dec. 6 for possessing less than 15 grams of clonazepam.

Her bail was set at $70,000.

 

 

 

 

http://www.kmov.com/news/local/Woman-charged-with-smuggling-meth-into-Madison-County-Jail-236590391.html

 

 

HONEA PATH, SC (FOX Carolina) – Honea Path police said a man is accused of having a mobile methamphetamine lab after officers found the illegal drugs following a traffic accident Wednesday night.

Police said they were called to West Hampton and Pruitt streets about 10:20 p.m. after the man’s minivan ran off the road and got stuck in a ditch.

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According to the police report, officers spoke with a man at the scene who said his wife was driving and he told her to pull off the road for an ambulance coming by and she ran too far off, getting stuck in the drainage ditch.

The report said when officers spoke with the man, identified as 38-year-old Aaron Clouse, he told them his wife walked back home.

When police went to the couple’s home, the report said she had been at the house with family for hours and had not been in the van with her husband.

Police said they told Clouse he would be charged with giving false information to police and as they spoke with him further, they discovered two pill bottles that had meth inside.

A neighbor reported seeing Clouse throw something away from the car and as they searched, police said they found items used for the shake and bake method of manufacturing methamphetamine.

Hazmat crews and additional personnel were called to the scene to help investigate and clean it up.

Police arrested Clouse, charging him with manufacturing methamphetamine, trafficking methamphetamine, not having a South Carolina driver’s license and giving false information to police.

 

 

http://www.foxcarolina.com/story/24263686/police-meth-lab-found-after-man-blames-wrecked-car-on-wife

 

 

An Easton woman has been charged with endangering the welfare of her baby daughter because the two of them spent time at a Bethlehem Township property that housed a methamphetamine lab, court records say.
At times, the woman apparently left the baby alone while she smoked meth, the records say.
The charge against Betty Jane Stonewall, 29, of 378 W. Nesquehoning St. on the Easton’s South Side is tied to an early-morning raid at 1450 Sixth St. in the township on Sept. 25. Three other people have been charged in the case.
Stonewall and her daughter were at the property at the time of the 6 a.m. raid carried out by township police and state police’s Clandestine Laboratory Team.
At the time of the raid, the little girl was two days short of being 5 months old.
The suspected meth lab was in a pool shed. There is also a house on the property.
A criminal complaint filed by township Sgt. Richard Blake describes how a woman—not Stonewall—and her five children were living at the house. The property is owned by a trust fund in the name of one of the woman’s children who is “severely disabled—mentally and physically.”
The woman “had actual physical control of the property in order to provide care and shelter” for the disabled child, the complaint says.
The woman told police that Stonewall and her daughter had been at the house at least three times and each time they stayed for two to three days.
She said Stonewall would smoke meth in the woman’s bedroom closet or in the shed. “When she smoked in the closet, she would leave [the baby] on her carrier seat in the bedroom, and when she smoked in the pool shed, she would leave [the baby] in the house with someone else,” the woman said.
The woman also said Stonewall “only came to the house to get or smoke methamphetamine.”
During the raid, police found a glassine smoking pipe with residue testing positive for meth on a closet shelf in the woman’s bedroom, the complaint says.
The woman and a man described as the woman’s “self-admitted boyfriend” told police they were using meth. The woman said she started using the drug about two months before the raid “due to the stress in her life that she couldn’t deal with.”
The boyfriend said he was aware that two of the other three people charged in the case were making meth in the shed. He said production occurred 10 to 15 times and that “they almost blew up the pool shed several times.”
The woman and her boyfriend apparently were not charged in the case, court records indicate.
Stonewall was arraigned Thursday by District Judge Joseph Barner of Lower Nazareth Township on a charge of endangering the welfare of children. She was released on $7,500 unsecured bail.
The court file does not say if Stonewall’s daughter is still with her or was taken from her.
Here is some information on the other three people charged in the case:

  • Thomas Dee Stocker, 28, found inside the shed during the raid. He admitted to police that he was making meth in the shed, according to information in Stonewall’s criminal complaint. He waived all six charges— including three felony counts—against him at a Nov. 25 preliminary hearing before Barner, online records say. Stocker, who told police he was living in the shed but is listed as having an Easton address, remains in Northampton County Prison in lieu of $85,000 bail.
  • Dawn Marie Stocker, 52, identified in a previous Patch story as living at the Sixth Street property, also waived charges at a Nov. 25 preliminary hearing before Barner. She’s facing only two charges—drug possession and possession of drug paraphernalia. She remains in county prison in lieu of $7,500 bail. Court records do not explain how Thomas Stocker and Dawn Marie Stocker are related.
  • Kia Feflie, 20, of Easton, is facing the same six charges as Thomas Stocker. The boyfriend of the woman with the five children identified the two people suspected of making meth in the shed as Feflie and Thomas Stocker. She too waived the charges at a Nov. 25 preliminary hearing before Barner. She was freed from county prison after posting $10,000 bail on Nov. 18, the online records say.

 

 

 

 

http://bethlehem.patch.com/groups/police-and-fire/p/police-woman-using-meth-endangered-baby-daughter