On Friday morning, El Centro Sector Border Patrol agents assigned to the Indio Station apprehended a suspected narcotics smuggler at the Highway 86 checkpoint and seized 25 pounds of methamphetamine.

ivp-el-centro-sector-border-patrol-seizes-8000-001

The incident occurred about 5 a.m., when a 54-year-old male approached the Border Patrol checkpoint located between Westmorland and Salton City.  A canine team alerted to the vehicle, a 1995 Isuzu Trooper, which was subsequently referred to secondary inspection.  Upon further investigation, agents discovered six packages of methamphetamine concealed within the vehicle.

The methamphetamine had a combined weight of approximately 25 pounds and an estimated street value of $800,000. The man, a U.S. citizen, was arrested as the sole suspect in the case.

The suspect, vehicle and narcotics were turned over to the Drug Enforcement Administration for further investigation.

http://www.ivpressonline.com/news/quicknews/ivp-el-centro-sector-border-patrol-seizes-800000-worth-of-methamphetamine-at-checkpoint-20130708,0,7977044.story

PORTLAND, Ore. – If you can’t admit you’ve hit rock bottom when police find you hiding behind a kiddie pool with methamphetamine in a stranger’s backyard, you probably never will.

Police said they chased 31-year-old Michael Pollack after he sped away Sunday around noon when they tried to pull him over for traffic infractions at SE 82nd Ave. and Division St. When he reached the 2400 block of NE 50th Ave., police say Pollack stopped his car and bolted.

Police say chase ends with man, meth hiding behind kiddie pool

Michael Pollack

They established a perimeter and called in a K-9 unit, eventually tracking him down behind the kiddie pool in the 2500 block of NE 49th Ave.

Pollack was taken into custody without incident and booked into the Multnomah County Jail on a charge of possession of methamphetamine.

Police said additional charges might be added.

 

 

 

http://www.katu.com/news/local/Police-say-chase-ends-with-man-meth-hiding-behind-kiddie-pool-214612081.html

 

 

NORFOLK, Va. (WAVY) – An investigation at Norfolk military housing resulted in the arrest of a military wife on methamphetamine charges.

Officers responded to 528 Eilers Street July 3 around 3 p.m.. That’s in the Ben Morell military housing area.

Investigators discovered a plastic bag that contained several items related to manufacturing methamphetime, according to police spokeswoman Karen Parker-Chesson.

MARIA_Williams_DOB_030713_20130708170619_JPG

Maria Williams is charged with 3 counts of Manufacturing Methamphetamine and one count of Possessing 2 or more Pre-Cursors with the Intent to Manufacture Methamphetamine in connection with a July 3, 2013 investigation.

 

meth2_20130703235621_JPGmeth2_20130703235621_JPG

 
Maria Williams, who lives at the home, was charged with three counts manufacturing methamphetamine and one count of possessing two or more pre-cursors with the intent to manufacture methamphetamine. Williams was charged two weeks earlier with conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine and possession of methamphetamine.

A red note from the U.S. Department of Justice Drug Enforcement Administration was posted on the front porch, that read:

WARNING A clandestine laboratory for the manufacture of illegal drugs and/or hazardous chemicals was seized at this location. Known hazardous chemicals have been disposed of pursuant to the law. However, there still may be hazardous substances or waste products on this property, either in buildings or in the ground itself. Please exercise caution while on these premises.

A green note posted by the Norfolk Fire Marshal’s Office on the same front porch reads:

NOTICE This structure is unsafe or unfit for habitation and its use or occupancy has been prohibited by the FIRE MARSHAL. It is unlawful to remove, cover, deface or destroy this placard (City Code section 29-75). Unauthorized persons found on premises will be arrested. Penalty: Up to $2500 fine and/or 12 months in jail.

 

The investigation determined Williams’ husband was not involved and was unaware of what was taking place in the home while he was out of town.

The investigation is ongoing.

 

 

 

 

http://www.wavy.com/dpp/news/local_news/norfolk/military-wife-charged-in-meth-case

 

 

A raid last week in East Topeka by federal authorities and local law enforcement has resulted in drug charges for 15 defendants.

Federal prosecutors on Monday announced indictments on charges tied to conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine, which would carry a minimum sentence of 10 years in prison if convicted.

Lupita Luccro Gomez, 32, of Kansas City, Kan.  SUBMITTED

Lupita Luccro Gomez, 32, of Kansas City, Kan.
Nancy Gutierrez-Soto, 22, of Topeka.  SUBMITTED

Nancy Gutierrez-Soto, 22, of Topeka.

Arturo Gomez-Favela, 36, of Topeka.  SUBMITTED

Arturo Gomez-Favela, 36, of Topeka.
Gustavo Arnulfo Gonzalez-Valadez, 26, of Topeka.  SUBMITTED

Gustavo Arnulfo Gonzalez-Valadez, 26, of Topeka
Ismael Murillo-Nunez, 49, of Topeka.  SUBMITTED

Ismael Murillo-Nunez, 49, of Topeka
Raul Cortes-Ponce, 52, of Kansas City, Kan.  SUBMITTED

Raul Cortes-Ponce, 52, of Kansas City, Kan.
Saul Gomez-Salas, 29, of Topeka.  SUBMITTED

Saul Gomez-Salas, 29, of Topeka.
Miguel Angel Adame-Regino, 24, of Topeka.  SUBMITTED

Miguel Angel Adame-Regino, 24, of Topeka.
Jaime Lorrenzo Torres-Reyes, 28, of Topeka.  SUBMITTED

Jaime Lorrenzo Torres-Reyes, 28, of Topeka
Jessica Francis Howard, 30, of Topeka.  SUBMITTED

Jessica Francis Howard, 30, of Topeka.

James Cross, a spokesman for U.S. Attorney Barry Grissom, confirmed the indictments were tied to operations July 2 in East Topeka, where vehicles were seen transporting a SWAT team. Local and federal officials had been reluctant to comment on the nature of the operations.

Some of the names of those indicted match the names of inmates booked into Shawnee County Jail last week and placed on federal holds.

The crimes are alleged to have happened in the Topeka area, a news release said. If convicted on a conspiracy charge, the sentence would range from 10 years to life and a fine up to $10 million. The use of a phone in drug trafficking would add up to four years and a fine up to $250,000 for each count.

The Drug Enforcement Agency and Topeka Police Department investigated the crimes, the release said. Also assisting were the Kansas Highway Patrol; the Emporia Police Department; the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives; and Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

The defendants named in the indictments are:

■ Francisco J. Granado Sr., 44, of Emporia, who is charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine and four counts of using a phone in furtherance of drug trafficking.

■ Arturo Favela-Gomez, 36, of Topeka, who is charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine, four counts of distributing methamphetamine and 16 counts of using a phone in furtherance of drug trafficking.

■ Ismael Murillo-Nunez, 50, of Topeka, who is charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine, one count of distributing methamphetamine and 11 counts of using a phone in furtherance of drug trafficking.

■ Saul Salas-Gomez, 29, of Topeka, who is charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine and five counts of using a phone in furtherance of drug trafficking.

■ Miguel Adame-Regino, who is charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine, two counts of distributing methamphetamine and four counts of using a phone in furtherance of drug trafficking.

■ Juan Carlos Flores-Rodriguez, 32, of Grand Island, Neb., who is charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine and three counts of using a phone in furtherance of drug trafficking.

■ Chela Murillo, of Topeka, who is charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine and three counts of using a phone in furtherance of drug trafficking.

■ Gustavo Gonzalez-Valadez, 26, of Topeka, who is charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine and two counts of using a phone in furtherance of drug trafficking.

■ Jamie, last name unknown, who is charged with one count of conspiracy and four counts of using a phone in furtherance of drug trafficking.

■ Jerman Aldava, 28, of Dodge City, who is charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine and nine counts of using a phone in furtherance of drug trafficking.

■ Jessica Howard, 30, of Topeka, who is charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine and six counts of using a phone in furtherance of drug trafficking.

■ Robert Lovgren, 56, of Manhattan, who is charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine and three counts of using a phone in furtherance of drug trafficking.

■ Lupita Gomez, 32, of Kansas City, Kan., who is charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine.

■ Nancy Gutierrez-Soto, of Topeka, who is charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine and two counts of using a phone in furtherance of drug trafficking.

■ Raul Cortes-Ponce, 52, of Kansas City, Kan., who is charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine and five counts of using a phone in furtherance of drug trafficking.

 

 

 

http://cjonline.com/news/2013-07-08/dea-raid-east-topeka-results-15-charged-meth-distribution

 

 

KALAMAZOO, Mich. (AP) — Delicate lung tissues scorched by heat and assaulted by toxic gases. Facial features blistered beyond recognition, and fingers charred beyond function. Extreme pain and anxiety.

Trauma surgeon Paul Blostein has seen — and treated — it all.

He has this to say to anyone with thoughts of cooking up methamphetamine: “Don’t do it.”

The 58-year-old physician, at Bronson Methodist Hospital for the last 20 years, has spent considerable time treating victims of serious burns, people injured in car crashes, house fires, industrial accidents and other mishaps.

For more than 10 years he has been tracking a relatively new category of burn victim — those caught up in the burst of flames that can result when amateur chemists try to make illicit methamphetamine from a mish-mash of over-the-counter pills and household chemicals.

The homemade laboratories, usually contained in a 2-litre pop bottle, can explode, spraying flaming chemicals that splash and burn “sort of like napalm,” Blostein told the Kalamazoo Gazette (  ).

His research has documented what Bronson doctors and nurses have observed about meth-related burns — wounds that are slower to heal, lungs that take longer to regain function, pain that is more difficult to manage, and patients who require much more care.

“It was after 2000 when we started to see the patients that came in and began to have some inkling they had been involved in meth production,” Blostein said.

There was one year when the team saw meth-burn patient numbers plummet, and he and colleagues thought the era of making meth in Michigan had waned.

That was seven years ago.

Those hopes were dashed when meth makers learned a way to evade police and laws meant to squeeze off the meth trade through the new “one-pot” system of “cooking” meth.

The simplified method eliminates the need for the hard-to-come-by farm fertilizer anhydrous ammonia and requires little more than a few two-liter pop bottles, plastic tubing, household chemicals, and cold tablets. The next year, meth burns began to climb again at Bronson, and these days Blostein is resigned to his role in the trenches of Southwest Michigan’s war on the drug.

Bronson’s Level I Trauma Center’s burn unit, the regional receptacle for all seriously burned patients, receives patients from all over Southwest Michigan. Because this corner of the state also ranks at the top of Michigan’s illicit methamphetamine activity, the hospital sees more meth-related burns than others, and is one of the few in the country to undertake a long-term study of methamphetamine-related burns.

Last year, 12 patients were admitted to Bronson Methodist Hospital for treatment of meth-related burns, the second-highest total since 2000.

Every case is different, Blostein said. Although the primary meth “cooks” are most frequently burned, he has treated bystanders who are burned, too, patients as young as age 2 and as old as 60. Not everyone lives through a lab explosion, and some who do survive never fully recover, he said.

Nor do serious burns prove enough to break the addiction in every patient, Blostein said. As the saying goes in his department, “trauma is a recurrent disease,” and he’s treated some repeat victims over the years.

Blostein said he enjoys the pace and variety of trauma work, where every day brings surprises and the challenge of saving lives.

Making order of the chaos of trauma starts for Blostein with a change from street clothes to scrubs at the beginning of every 12-hour shift. He takes some ribbing from colleagues who suggest simply wearing scrubs to work makes more sense, but Blostein likes to be prepared for whatever the day brings — and that means having street clothes on hand if the need arises.

Every shift starts and ends the same, too, with a sign-off from the doctor who’s going off duty to the one coming on board on the status of the 10 to 20 patients in the trauma unit at any given time.

“Here we have a nice arrangement where trauma surgeons do an initial evaluation, resuscitation, insert a breathing tube if necessary, manage fluids — a challenging thing for large burn patients,” Blostein said. “The burn surgeon does burn wound reconstruction and skin grafts.”

He will spend the day monitoring trauma patients’ progress — tweaking ventilators, watching fluid output, scheduling surgeries and procedures, checking for signs of infection, overseeing nutrition and managing pain, as well as performing surgeries. “Many have multiple injuries requiring multiple surgeries,” he said. “The trauma surgeon lays out the plan of action for each injured person.”

Extra physicians are always on standby, since the job of overseeing treatment for those patients may be interrupted at any time by incoming trauma emergencies, he said.

That’s the drill for more than 60 hours each week.

“In between all that excitement, on days off we write papers, do research, teach medical students and residents — that happens on a daily basis, ” he said.

Though meth-explosion burns require much the same treatment as those from house fires or car crashes, Blostein said he’s learned over the years to expect differences.

One is immediately apparent. Patients burned by meth usually don’t tell the truth about the source of their burns, he said. “A tell-tale sign is the story doesn’t make sense. ‘It’s 3 a.m. and I decided to fix my dryer.’ That sort of thing.”

Another: “We’ve sort of noticed a pattern of burns involving hands and face and maybe legs — though it’s nothing we can really put finger on,” he said.

Doctors must be extra alert to signs of infection, extra vigilant about monitoring ventilators and fluids, and should not be surprised if recovery seems slower than normal with meth-burn patients, he said. Researchers are not sure why those challenges are present, but their studies have documented that the differences are real.

Finally, it may be difficult to control the patient’s pain and anxiety with medication, Blostein said, probably because of pre-existing issues.

“One of the things that makes it difficult is these patients often have multiple substance abuse problems, ” he said, in addition to methamphetamine addiction. If they are addicted to a narcotic, it may be difficult to get pain under control. If they are addicted to meth, they may become agitated, pulling out IVs and feeding tubes, or trying to get out of bed, he said.

Blostein’s thoughts about the Michigan’s methamphetamine problem, he said, reflect his years of work with its burn victims.

“I think when we sit and reflect, we would all like it not to be happening so we wouldn’t have to spend hours and hours taking care of patients burned in meth activities,” he said. “And we think about the larger picture — a lot of people in jail, a lot of man-hours and dollars spent — and that money could certainly be used somewhere else.

“Then there’s the even bigger picture — why are people using meth in the first place?,” he said.

The economic downturn likely contributed, he said, with people perhaps cooking meth as a diversion from hardships in their lives.

“But no, those things don’t get us down,” he said. “We still go off and do our jobs.”

Blostein said he and his colleagues are grateful for the resources they have available working in a Level I trauma center, something he said people in the community may take for granted. They also are acutely aware of the costs of maintaining that resource, and feel the pressure to work efficiently to keep costs down without trimming services, he said. They worry about legislation that might have an impact on funding.

At the end of every shift, Blostein has another ritual — changing back from street clothes into T-shirts and shorts for a 5-mile run.

It’s partly for his health, he said, and a way to work the kinks out after 12 hours on his feet.

The other part?

Clearing his mind — so that he can get up at 5:30 a.m. the next day and do it all again.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.necn.com/07/08/13/Kalamazoo-surgeon-studies-burns-in-meth-/landing_health.html?&apID=5f951e7ea27441af94dbd36ded958d19

 

 

The St. Joseph County Sheriff’s Department is investigating an incident during which a vehicle last week was found to be on fire in the 64000 block of Burr Oak Road in Burr Oak Township.

Witnesses told investigators three people July 1 were seen fleeing from the van and tossing items into a nearby ditch. Upon closer inspection, officials found a one-pot methamphetamine lab to be the cause of the fire.

A second one-pot lab, which was active, was also found inside the vehicle.

A 25-year-old man was questioned after he showed up with burns to his lower extremities at the Sturgis Hospital emergency room.

 

 

 

http://www.wlkm.com/?p=33579

 

 

Two Jennings County men were taken into custody on meth-related charges early Monday morning after North Vernon Police received a complaint from a concerned resident about possible illegal drug activity.

Officer Justin Black, with the North Vernon Police Department says 52-year-old Kolin McDonald, of North Vernon, is charged with possession of methamphetamine, maintaining a common nuisance, possession of a hypodermic needle and possession of paraphernalia. Fifty-year-old Kevin Burton, of North Vernon, is charged with possession of methamphetamine, possession of a hypodermic needle, possession of paraphernalia and visiting a common nuisance.

Black says when officers approached the apartment in the 200 Block of East Walnut Street, they noticed a very strong odor of a chemical substance related with making methamphetamine. Officers went inside the apartment and the men were taken into custody. Shortly after the men were taken into custody, a search warrant was obtained and a search of the apartment was conducted. Police found during the search multiple items of paraphernalia, multiple syringes, a bag of an unknown substance and a small amount of methamphetamine.

The men are lodged in the Jennings County Jail.

http://wcsi.whiterivernews.com/templates/localnews_temp.asp?id=7475&storyno=1

Salton City, Calif. – On Friday, El Centro Sector Border Patrol agents assigned to the Indio Station apprehended a suspected narcotics smuggler at the Highway 86 checkpoint and seized 8.5 pounds of methamphetamine.

El Centro Sector Border Patrol agents discover 16 packages of methamphetamines located behind the rear seat of a vehicle at the Highway 86 checkpoint in Indio, Calif.
El Centro Sector Border Patrol agents discover 16 packages of methamphetamines located behind the rear seat of a vehicle at the Highway 86 checkpoint in Indio, Calif.

The incident occurred at approximately 2:40 p.m., when a 22-year-old female driver approached the Border Patrol checkpoint located between Westmorland and Salton City. A canine detection team alerted to a 1999 Chrysler Cirrus as it approached the primary inspection lane. The vehicle was referred to secondary inspection where agents discovered 16 packages of methamphetamine concealed within the back seat of the vehicle.

The methamphetamine had a combined weight of 8.5 pounds and an estimated street value of more than $272,000. The female driver, a United States citizen, was taken into custody. The woman, vehicle, and contraband were turned over to the Drug Enforcement Administration for further investigation.

The El Centro Sector’s Community Awareness Campaign is a simple and effective program to raise public awareness on the indicators of crime and other threats. We encourage public and private sector employees to remain vigilant and play a key role in keeping our country safe. Please report any suspicious activity to the Border Community Threat Hotline at (800)901-2003.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection is the unified border agency within the Department of Homeland Security charged with the management, control and protection of our nation’s borders at and between the official ports of entry. CBP is charged with keeping terrorists and terrorist weapons out of the country while enforcing hundreds of U.S. laws.

 

 

 

 

http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/newsroom/news_releases/local/06262013_4.xml

 

In the wake of another study indicating widespread meth use in Sacramento, Central Valley law enforcement officials say savvy meth traffickers have made it harder to crack down on the drug.

In recent years, policymakers in the United States and Mexico have passed laws to restrict the sale of chemicals commonly used to make meth. But levels of use have remained high.

A survey released in May by the Office of National Drug Control Policy found that 40 percent of men arrested in Sacramento County last year had methamphetamine in their systems. While slightly down from 2011 levels, that figure was up 10 percentage points from 2009.

“This drug is so prevalent,” said Sgt. Carlos Ponce of the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department. He said meth production has changed since the 1990s, when “superlabs” that could produce 10 to hundreds of pounds of meth in a single batch dotted the Central Valley.

Today, law enforcement officials say most of the meth trafficked in California isn’t even made here.

“Eighty percent of the meth traffic in the U.S. is either made in Mexico or comes from Mexican organizations,” said John Donnelly, who heads the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration’s office in Fresno. Other estimates are as high as 95 percent.

Donnelly said that due to Mexico’s all-out ban on pseudoephedrine, a decongestant commonly used in meth production, Mexican cartels have reverted to a less-efficient method of production – one that does not rely on pseudoephedrine – that was once used by the biker gangs that controlled the meth trade until the 1980s. (In the United States, regulation of pseudoephedrine varies by state.)

Cartels, however, have improved on the bikers’ methods, Donnelly said, by using a chemical called tartyric acid to increase the purity of their product.

Once it’s made, law enforcement officials say most meth is smuggled across the border dissolved in liquid form.

“It started coming across like a year ago,” said Bill Ruzzamenti, director of a federal law enforcement coordination program called the Central Valley High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, or HIDTA, in Sacramento. He said dissolved meth has been hidden in windshield wiper fluid reservoirs to avoid X-ray detection, and has recently turned up in tequila bottles and detergent jugs with factory seals on them.

Once it reaches the Central Valley, meth is extracted from the solution and crystallized at so-called “ice conversion labs.”

“We’re finding more conversion labs than the actual cooking of methamphetamine here,” said Fresno County Sheriff Margaret Mims. Last October, a house in Fresno being used as an ice conversion lab exploded, damaging several nearby homes.

Another kind of meth lab that has steadily been on the rise in California is called the “one pot” or “shake-and-bake” method. It originated in the Southeast and the Midwest, and it is increasingly being used in California, according to Erasmo Carrizosa, an agent with the California Department of Justice.

The one-pot method yields grams or ounces of meth. It produces meth by mixing water, pseudoephedrine, lithium, Coleman stove fuel and other chemicals in a soda bottle, and it’s extremely dangerous. One mistake, and the bottle can explode.

Traffickers are also becoming more discrete about hiding the signs of activity, said Ruzzamenti, with some operations burying the equipment they use to process meth.

Because so much meth production has moved to Mexico, statistics on the prevalence of meth can sometimes seem contradictory. Across California, statistics collected by the DEA show that meth lab discoveries – including dump sites and chemical equipment – have been on a long decline.

On the other hand, the total amount of meth seized across the country has skyrocketed in recent years, going from about 4,800 pounds in 2010 to over 8,500 pounds in 2012, and Central Valley officials say meth-related incidents are on the rise.

“In 2011, we had 30 events related to a meth lab. In 2012, that jumped to 47,” said Jill Edwards, the program analyst for the Central Valley HIDTA.

Officials say the apparent increase in meth lab activity hasn’t been a product of increased policing, but just the opposite.

Ruzzamenti said the law enforcement agencies he works with have been trying to make do with less.

Previously, “almost every single police department and every sheriff’s department had a narcotics unit,” he said. “Now I’d say that of all my sheriffs and police departments up and down the Valley, 75 percent of them don’t have narcotics units. They can’t dedicate the resources.”

The Sacramento Police Department shuttered its narcotics division in 2011 because of budget cuts, and the state laid off most employees of the Bureau of Narcotics in 2011 as well.

But some agencies aren’t feeling the squeeze. Sheriff Mims said Fresno County has been able to keep the pressure on meth operations and that state and federal assistance has helped.

“We get lots of good results, lots of prosecutions,” Mims said. She says lab seizures are down in her county. But she cautioned that her department’s success “might have pushed the lab production to other counties.”

“The meth problem has not gone away,” Ruzzamenti said. “There’s no question about it.”

80%: Percentage of meth originating from Mexico being trafficked in the U.S., according to John Donnelly, resident agent in charge at the DEA’s Fresno field office.

Danny Nelson, 49, of King City and his 28-year-old companion, Roseann Davis of Soledad, were arrested Saturday after Nelson was allegedly caught stripping a stranded boat at Lake San Antonio.

The boat had run aground about three weeks prior because of low water levels, the Monterey County Sheriff’s Department reported. Deputies said Nelson admitted he spotted the boat the day before and returned the following day with intentions of stripping it.

He had numerous boat electronic gear, along with other boating items from the marooned boat in his possession. The boat did not belong to him.

While searching his vehicle for other stolen items, Deputies found methamphetamine and a methamphetamine smoking pipe in the vehicle that belonged to a Davis. Both were arrested.

 

 

 

http://www.thecalifornian.com/article/20130707/NEWS01/307070011/Pair-arrested-for-stealing-boat-parts-meth?nclick_check=1

 

 

Authorities raided nine suspected labs and arrested dozens of people during a two-month methamphetamine investigation in Grundy County, Tenn., that began in April.

Sheriff Brent Myers said the investigation struck a major blow.

“We have been working very hard on this case, and we will continue to aggressively pursue anyone involved in making methamphetamine here in Grundy County,” Myers said. “We will do anything and everything we can to stop this.”

The investigation relied on pseudoephedrine-based cold medicine purchasing data collected under state law.

“This case seems to weave a very interesting web of people that are all connected in some fashion or another from all corners of the county, from Pelham to Monteagle and Altamont to Palmer,” department spokesman David Hodges said Tuesday.

Investigators used state Methamphetamine Task Force data collected from pharmacies where pseudoephedrine-based cold medicine — such as Sudafed-Congestion, Advil Cold & Sinus, Tylenol Cold Severe Congestion, Mucinex-D and other brands — is sold.

APRIL TO JULY ARRESTS

• Daniel Kilgore, 37, Monteagle, methamphetamine manufacturing, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing, initiation of the process to manufacture methamphetamine

• Cecelia Nunley, 44, Monteagle, methamphetamine manufacturing, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing, initiation of the process to manufacture methamphetamine

• James Jenkins, 43, Monteagle, methamphetamine manufacturing, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing, initiation of the process to manufacture methamphetamine

• Jeff Jenkins, 47, Monteagle, methamphetamine manufacturing, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing, initiation of the process to manufacture methamphetamine

• Beatrice Nolan, 62, Tracy City, methamphetamine manufacturing, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing

• William Cannon, 48, Monteagle, methamphetamine manufacturing, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing, initiation of the process to manufacture methamphetamine

• Chris King, 42, Beersheba, methamphetamine manufacturing, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing, initiation of the process to manufacture methamphetamine

• Amanda King, 34, Altamont, methamphetamine manufacturing, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing, initiation of the process to manufacture methamphetamine

• Justin Barks, 25, Beersheba, methamphetamine manufacturing, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing, initiation of the process to manufacture methamphetamine

• Teesha Manley, 20, Tracy City, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing

• Casey James, 33, Gruetli-Laager, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing

• Cody Hill, Tracy City, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing

• Lee Anderson, 28, Tracy City, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing, initiation of the process to manufacture methamphetamine

• Jammy Curtis, 37, South Pittsburg, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing, initiation of the process to manufacture methamphetamine, criminal conspiracy to manufacture methamphetamine

• Amanda Comer, 31, Altamont, methamphetamine manufacturing, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing, initiation of the process to manufacture methamphetamine

• Joseph Wideman, 33, of Palmer, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing

• Heather King, 34, Palmer, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing

• Paul G. Curtis, 49, Coalmont, criminal conspiracy to manufacture methamphetamine

• John H. Hobbs, 27, Altamont, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing and initiation of the process to manufacture methamphetamine

• Patrick Killian, 26, Beersheba, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing

• Tiffany Allen, 37, Palmer, methamphetamine manufacturing, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing, initiation of the process to manufacture methamphetamine

• Dale Callahan, 44, Palmer, methamphetamine manufacturing, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing, initiation of the process to manufacture methamphetamine

• Shawn Allen, 40, Palmer, methamphetamine manufacturing, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing, initiation of the process to manufacture methamphetamine

• Catherine McGee, 25, Tracy City, methamphetamine manufacturing, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing and initiation of the process to manufacture methamphetamine

• Nicholas Callahan, 22, Palmer, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing

• Candice Gilliam, 23, Tracy City, methamphetamine manufacturing, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing

• Zach Rymer, 26, Altamont, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing, methamphetamine manufacturing

• Jessica Dockery, 23, Tracy City, methamphetamine manufacturing, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing

• Donnie Nolan, 45, Palmer, methamphetamine manufacturing, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing

• Jeremy Hill, 35, Tracy City, methamphetamine manufacturing, promotion of methamphetamine manufacturing

State law requires anyone who buys pseudoephedrine-based cold medicine to present a valid ID and to sign a log. Buyers are limited to 9 grams a month under laws that trigger a red flag that authorities can act upon when that amount is exceeded, Hodges said.

Purchasing data revealed “an extensive network” of “Smurfs,” people who buy cold medicines for meth cooks to use to produce the drug.

“During interviews numerous people stated that meth cooks paid $60 to $120 for a box of cold tablets,” Hodges said. “Some even said that they would take or exchange food or finished meth product for the cold pills containing pseudoephedrine.”

Other cooks traded drugs or money for use of a house or property for manufacturing the highly addictive drug, officials said. Labs were found in “nice homes, run-down campers, and several out in the woods,” Hodges said.

Officials said most of the people arrested as meth cooks “admitted to being addicts and said they just did it for their own use,” countered by one who said he was “more addicted to the process of making the drug than the actual drug itself.”

Court dates vary for those arrested.

 

 

 

http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/2013/jul/03/meth-probe-nets-arrests/?print

 

AIZAWL, July 7 – Already in the midst of a fierce fight against heroin, illicit pharmaceutical drugs (PD) and alcohol, Mizoram’s anti-drug fighters are girding up to face a wave from Myanmar. Those in the know say that the nightmare is already here.

The “wave” was created partially by Mizoram as the meth factories across its border in China are partly fueled by pseudoephedrine smuggled out from India into those countries.

“Our sources tell us that meth is already here,” the Commissioner of Excise and Narcotics Department, Lalbiakmawia Khiangte told the State Level Committee on Prevention of Drug Abuse in Educational Institutions chaired by Chief Minister Lalthanhawla and attended by six Ministers earlier this week. Pressing for utmost support to face this menace, known as one of the most dangerous chemical derivatives in the world, Khiangte painted a serious picture.

The Committee was set up few months ago in the wake of a spate of PD misuse related deaths of more than a dozen youth and an official assessment of rampant PD abuse among children and teenagers. But its actions have so far been invisible, barring banning the sale of proxyvon, another much misused PD.

Khiangte told The Assam Tribune today that though the report is yet to be confirmed with a meth catch, the prognosis clearly showed that sooner or later the “meth wave” would crash into the State as peddlers from Burma or China where meth factories have set up a roaring business, partly on Indian pseudoephedrine smuggled to them through this State. “It’s a case of the chickens coming home to roost”, he pointed out.

“Pseudoephedrine is bought from other parts of India and smuggled out to Burma through our State, which is then used to make methamphetamine and other derivatives which is smuggled across the world, ” he said. It’s a wonder that Mizoram and its neighbouring States have escaped the meth menace from Myanmar so far.

But that’s not for want of trying by the peddlers. Excise seized 670 tablets of meth in 2001, 971 in 2002 and 287 in 2011. The first seizure of meth was way back in the late nineties, they said.

But now, the word is that the peddlers are here and if the Mizo social networks are to be believed, the evil business often kick starts with a free offer of samples to impressionable youngsters as in heroin addiction. Most addicts start off as “Tih Chhin” translating to ‘experiments’. Meth and its family is highly addictive and therefore the high danger.

A huge number of tablets of different varieties of normal medicines with high content of pseudoephedrine has been seized between June 2011 to June 2013. Nearly 14.5 kgs of Ephedrine was seized last month too. Dozens of persons have been arrested and arrests are expected almost everyday as smugglers try to get the better of the over-worked, untrained sleuths and short-staffed law enforcement department.

But the arrests have failed to deter unscrupulous people bitten by the ‘get rich quick syndrome’. On July 2, a sub-inspector from the State CID branch and a constable posted in Champhai District, on the Myanmar border were arrested with 2,22,000 tablets of pseudoephidrine. The contraband goods were seized from the vehicle they were travelling in which police said belonged to the Intelligence Bureau (IB). Excise officials say that the profit margins seem high.

The rich pickings have made strange bedfellows with gangs of Mizo-Burmese-Chin-Delhiwallahs teaming up as was seen in the Delhi arrest of April 2013 in which 140 kgs of pseudoephedrine worth Rs 15 crore was seized, one of the biggest.

There is no shortage of bribery too as these people, who seem normally law abiding citizens. “I was offered lakhs of rupees to help facilitate a venture like this by a shameless person, ” said an official.

In the recent past, half a dozen paramilitary and military men including an Indian army Colonel (in Manipur) have been arrested trying to smuggle out pseudoephedrine.

With 410 kms of international border with Myanmar, Mizoram is already part of the Golden Triangle, as its main doorway in its western borders. How is it going to defend the youth of the region from this fresh attack of drugs is the moot question, even as media reports say that the meth wave is sweeping communities around the world. “It’s nothing less than a call for all hands on the deck”, as a State Excise official said.

 

 

 

 

http://www.assamtribune.com/scripts/detailsnew.asp?id=jul0813/oth07

 

 

PICAYUNE — On June 27, narcotics investigators with the Pearl River County Sheriff’s Office went to a residence on Lilac Drive after receiving complaints of methamphetamine being manufactured there, said Chief Investigator Donnie Saucier.

Detectives arrived on the scene and first made contact with Sephenie Sims, 27, at the front door of the residence, said Saucier.

“The odor of an active methamphetamine lab was apparent to detectives,” he said, “and precursor chemicals were observed in plain view.”

The scene was then secured and two suspects, James Cothran, 30, and Kristian Newell, 22, were located at the back of the residence and  taken into custody, along with Sims, said Saucier.

“Smoke from the active methamphetamine lab was so heavy in the residence,” Saucier said. Investigators had to open doors and windows to vent the house for safety reasons. While the house was being vented, Michael Fisher, 28, “jumped out of a closet and began fighting investigators,” he said.“ He lost and was taken into custody.”

 

A search warrant was issued for the property and as a result of the search, an active methamphetamine lab, along with precursor chemicals was located inside the residence, said Saucier.

The Hazardous Waste Disposal Team was called to the scene to dispose of materials.

“To make matters worse,” Saucier said, “all of this was taking place with a 14-month-old child in the residence.”

The Department of Human Services was called to the scene and tended to the child.

All four suspects were charged with manufacturing a controlled substance, possession of precursor chemicals, generation of hazardous waste, conspiracy to manufacture a controlled substance and child endangerment, said Saucier.

“Fisher was additionally charged with resisting arrest by fighting,” he said.

 

 

 

http://picayuneitem.com/local/x881891659/Meth-lab-discovered-quartet-arrested

 

 

A Clermont couple were arrested Saturday after a fire broke out, and police said they were making methamphetamine while their children were home.

Allen Arnold, 32, a father of three, and his wife, Summer Richardson, 27, a mother of one, were booked into the Lake County Jail on charges of manufacture of methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia and child endangerment.

Photo: Richardson and Arnold

Summer Richardson, 27, and her husband, Allen Arnold, 32, were arrested July  6, 2013 after police said a fire at their home in Clermont was caused by a methamphetamine-lab explosion

 

 

Arnold was covered with blood and had cuts on his arms, face and head when police arrived at the house on Desoto Street about 1:15 a.m., officers said.

He told them he hurt himself smashing a bedroom window as he tried to put out the fire with a garden hose. He also said the flames may have started in an air conditioner, according to police.

Investigators say the fire actually broke out while Arnold was cooking methamphetamine. Clermont firefighters said it began in a rear bedroom wardrobe or entertainment center that wasn’t near any of the air-conditioning units.

Police found gas cans and canisters near the point of origin and saw broken glass and a trail of blood leading to a storage shed several yards away, they said.

Arnold admitted he tried to cook methamphetamine and a jar exploded in the couple’s bedroom, sparking the fire, investigators said. He was treated at South Lake Hospital before being booked into the Lake County Jail.

No one else was hurt.

Bail was set at $60,500 each for Arnold and Richardson.

The children, ages 2, 3, 7 and 11, were staying with a grandmother.

The state Department of Children and Families was notified of the arrests.

 

 

 

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/local/breakingnews/os-meth-lab-clermont-family-20130706,0,7246915.story

 

 

SOUTHPORT — Two people were arrested Saturday morning after authorities found an apparent  methamphetamine lab at a home on Pennsylvania Avenue in Southport.

Chemung County Sheriff’s deputies raid the home at 1778 Pennsylvania Ave.  around 5:30 a.m. Saturday. Inside, they found lab equipment, all the ingredients  used to make methamphetamine and a .45-caliber handgun.
Lauren Buchanan

Lauren Buchanan

 

Raymond Buchanan

Raymond Buchanan

 

As a result of the raid, Raymond H. Buchanan, 38, and Lauren M. Buchanan,  24, were taken into custody. Both were charged with third-degree unlawful  manufacturing of methamphetamine, a class D felony, and endangering the welfare  of a child. Additionally, Raymond Buchanan was charged with second-degree  criminal possession of a weapon, a felony.

Both Buchanans were arraigned in Southport Town Court. Raymond Buchanan was  jailed on $10,000 cash bail, and Lauren Buchanan was ordered held on $20,000  cash bail.

The investigation is continuing.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.the-leader.com/news/x1806119448/Sheriff-2-arrested-after-meth-lab-found-in-Southport#axzz2YP2Km3QX

 

 

SHELBY — A couple was arrested on meth charges Wednesday following an investigation of their vehicle near the Shelby post office.

John Franklin Patterson, 32, and Staci Renee Patterson, 29, both of Dallas, N.C., were charged after police said meth oil was found in their truck.

The two were first discovered by a Star newspaper carrier.

The carrier, Antonius Surratt, said he was eating Jack in The Box pancakes, eggs, sausage and hashbrowns in the Lowe’s home improvement store parking lot off Earl Road before 8 a.m.

He said, while he was eating, he spotted the couple having sex in a nearby truck. He said the Pattersons drove off moments later.

“I called the police while they were in the act and wrote down their tag numbers,” Surratt said. “We followed them until the police caught up.”

Shelby Police responded about 9 a.m. and pulled the vehicle over on Pinkney Street, between Clark Tire and the Shelby post office on Dekalb Street.

Police closed the road for less than an hour as they searched the vehicle, said Shelby Police Capt. Rick Stafford.

“We found meth ingredients in the truck, such as Coleman Fuel,” Stafford said. “The truck has been towed and we are applying for a search warrant.”

Items such as Coleman Fuel are used to make meth, often along with other products like pseudoephedrine and battery parts.

The Pattersons were taken to the Cleveland County Detention Center. Both were charged with manufacturing meth and were placed under a $15,000 bond, Stafford said.

Police records show the Pattersons are set to appear in court Friday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://futures.tradingcharts.com/news/futures/BREAKING_NEWS__Couple_charged_with_meth_at_post_office_were_caught_having_sex_in_public__3_35_p_m___200089884.html

 

 

It is often called the “walk-way drug” because for many users, the feelings of euphoria, energy and pleasure associated with methamphetamine use quickly become an addiction/obsession, which then becomes the driving force in their lives, causing them to literally walk away from their families, their children, their jobs and their responsibilities.

It has also been called the “full employment provider” for law enforcement, human services, mental health and substance abuse treatment providers, because once in the grip of addiction, methamphetamine users are much more likely to be incarcerated, come to the attention of child welfare agencies, and need mental health and substance abuse treatment, thereby increasing the need for these intervention strategies/providers.

Methamphetamine abuse is still a major problem in eastern Colorado. Some 10 years ago a task force sought to quantify the cost of methamphetamine use in the 13th Judicial District and at that time a study conducted through Colorado State University concluded that methamphetamine use was costing the region at least a million dollars a year in terms of intervention services. And although we don’t hear as much about methamphetamine use now as we did then, the costs associated with our “failure to prevent” have continued to skyrocket. Meth use is a cost driver for all law enforcement agencies in the region, as well as human services agencies. It is estimated that more than half the child welfare cases in several counties have methamphetamine abuse as part of the presenting problem.

I suspect that the one of the reasons that we don’t hear as much about meth as we did a few years ago, is because law enforcement has done an excellent job in closing down meth labs in the region. Not that long ago, it was reported that northeast Colorado had the highest per capita amount of meth labs in the state and a concerted effort was made to bust these labs and incarcerate their operators. That strategy seemed to work fairly well and as one law enforcement officer told me, “We closed down most of the Beavis and Butthead meth labs.” Unfortunately, closing the labs didn’t diminish the demand for this drug and now most of the meth in the state, according to law enforcement officials, comes up from Mexico where it is made in “super-labs.”

Ten years ago the 13th Judicial District’s “Finding a Solution” task force sought to bring everyone involved in the methamphetamine issue together to problem solve solutions. At the time the focus was upon increased law enforcement (which worked), the development of a drug court (which may be in the works at the present time), and increased treatment options (which are available through Centennial Mental Center and cadre of local substance abuse providers). I was a member of that task force and I can attest that many people throughout the region gave considerable time and energy to finding solutions.

I think we missed something, though. I think we forgot to do a “root cause” analysis of why people use methamphetamine in the first place, and because we never addressed this root cause, we didn’t really change much. Meth labs were busted, people went to jail, treatment options expanded, and human services agencies got quite proficient at dealing with meth families in crisis, but we never addressed the “why” and because we didn’t identify the “why” our solutions were well-intentioned, but incomplete.

People who grow up in healthy families don’t use meth. Children who are well cared for and provided a nurturing, loving environment don’t experience the anger or the emptiness that often prompts early drug usage. A nurturing parent-child relationship is crucial for producing the next generation of healthy, responsible and self-sustaining adults. Substance abuse, depression and violence are forged in the crucible of non-nurturing parent-child relationships. Where nurturing occurs, highly productive, creative, healthy people abound.

Unfortunately, nurturing attitudes and behaviors are not necessarily instinctual, but rather are learned at our parents’ knees. The ways we love and interact with others and how we care for ourselves are powerfully impacted by our earliest life experiences, especially by our experiences of family life. A child growing up in a drug environment learns to “speak” the language of “drugs” and without intervention, for this child, “healthy living” is akin to learning a foreign language.

It’s time to begin addressing the question “why are so many young people in our communities using methamphetamine?” Intervention will always be important, but unless we begin to identify the root causes of the methamphetamine scourge, the costs will continue to grow, both in terms of dollars spent in intervention, and in the wasted lives of those consumed by this horrific drug.

 

 

 

http://www.journal-advocate.com/sterling-columnists/ci_23560691/methamphetamine-use-is-still-major-problem

 

 

A Winter Garden man was arrested Friday after police said they found him with the necessary supplies to make methamphetamine in his backpack.

Tray Charles Rudolph

 Tray Charles Rudolph was arrested Friday after police said they found him with the necessary supplies to make methamphetamine in his backpack

 

 

 

Tray Charles Rudolph, 46, is in the Orange County Jail booked on felony charges of possessing a listed chemical with the intent to unlawfully manufacture a controlled substance.

He was arrested in 2008, 2010 and 2012 on various drug-related charges including trafficking in amphetamine and possessing 14 grams or more of methamphetamine.

Rudolph’s long arrest record dates back to 1995.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/local/breakingnews/os-meth-arrest-20130706,0,477283.story

 

A couple were arrested Saturday after a fire broke out, and police said they were making methamphetamine while their children were home.

Allen Arnold, 32, a father of three, and his wife, Summer Richardson, 27, a mother of one, were booked into the Lake County Jail on charges of manufacture of methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia and child endangerment.

 

Summer Richardson, 27, and her husband, Allen Arnold, 32, were arrested July  6, 2013 after police said a fire at their home in Clermont was caused by a methamphetamine-lab explosion.
Summer Richardson, 27, and her husband, Allen Arnold, 32, were arrested July  6, 2013 after police said a fire at their home in Clermont was caused by a methamphetamine-lab explosion

 

 

Arnold was covered with blood and had cuts on his arms, face and head when police arrived at the house on Desoto Street about 1:15 a.m., officers said.

He told them he hurt himself smashing a bedroom window as he tried to put out the fire with a garden hose. He also said the flames may have started in an air conditioner, according to police.

Investigators say the fire actually broke out while Arnold was cooking methamphetamine. Clermont firefighters said it began in a rear bedroom wardrobe or entertainment center that wasn’t near any of the air-conditioning units.

Police found gas cans and canisters near the point of origin and saw broken glass and a trail of blood leading to a storage shed several yards away, they said.

Arnold admitted he tried to cook methamphetamine and a jar exploded in the couple’s bedroom, sparking the fire, investigators said. He was treated at South Lake Hospital before being booked into the Lake County Jail.

No one else was hurt.

Bail was set at $60,500 each for Arnold and Richardson.

The children, ages 2, 3, 7 and 11, were staying with a grandmother.

The state Department of Children and Families was notified of the arrests.

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/local/breakingnews/os-meth-lab-clermont-family-20130706,0,7246915.story

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PADUCAH, KY – McCracken County Sheriff’s detectives have seized four pounds of crystal methamphetamine, valued at $180,000 as part of an investigation that began in May.

Sheriff Jon Hayden says a large operation that began in Mayfield in late April ultimately led to a sting operation in mid-May in McCracken County.

Jose Jiminez

 

Hayden says that, at the beginning of May, detectives began direct conversations with an individual from Paducah who now resides in Mexico. A plan was eventually created for May 16, when delivery of methamphetamine from Mexico would be made to a Fisher Road location in McCracken County.

Detectives arrived that night at 9:45 and arrested 32-year-old Jose M. Jimenez of Batesville, Arkansas. Although drug detection dogs indicated the presence of narcotics on Jiminez and his vehicle, an extensive search and partial dismantling of the SUV yielded no drugs.

crystal methamphetamine seized by McCracken County Sheriff’s Dept

During the week of July 1, the Sheriff’s Department received new information regarding concealment of drugs around vehicle engines. The information reportedly led to the discovery of four pounds of crystal methamphetamine inside an SUV involved in this case.

Jiminez is charged with trafficking in methamphetamine. He has a previous conviction for marijuana trafficking in Arizona, and was out on bond from Texas for money laundering at the time of his arrest.

Jiminez is lodged in the McCracken Co. Jail in lieu of a $1.1 million bond.

Another suspect is being sought in the case.

 

 

 

 

 

http://westkentuckystar.com/News/Local-Regional/McCracken-County/Investigation-Yields-180k-in-Crystal-Meth.aspx

 

Fawn Waack’s 4-year-old son spent most of his days in a Davenport day care where a meth lab was discovered by police the week after Christmas.

The boy tested three times higher for methamphetamine than Amanda Taylor, the woman who ran the day care and who has since pleaded guilty to four felonies, including child endangerment.

Amanda M. Taylor

 

Taylor, 34, is scheduled to be sentenced next week. Meanwhile, her live-in boyfriend, Dale Blumer, 35, pleaded guilty to manufacturing meth, child endangerment and two other felonies, and a serious misdemeanor.

Dale Sammie Blummer

 

 

 

After sentencing Blumer to 25 years in prison, Scott County District Judge Nancy Tabor suspended the sentence, releasing him to probation.

Waack now lives in fear of the unknown effects of high-level meth exposure to such a young child and is furious her son never was listed as a victim in Blumer’s case.

“Every kid in that day care was a victim, actually,” Waack said. “My son got the worst of it, but no one thought of him. It’s like he doesn’t exist.”

In an email exchange this week, Tabor said she never was made aware of any victims in the Blumer case.

“I made my decision based upon the information in the file, which did not contain any comments or statements from any parents or anyone else on behalf of the state,” the judge wrote. “There were numerous comments at sentencing and letters in the file supporting the defendant however there were none regarding any victims nor information that there were victims nor did anyone speak on behalf of the state or any victims at the sentencing.”

The case files

During an interview with a Quad-City Times reporter, Freddie Taylor, Amanda Taylor’s ex-husband and the father of her four children, thumbed through copies of the 10 letters that were contained in court files, written to Tabor on Blumer’s behalf. Most of them were from family members seeking leniency.

“I can’t even read these,” he said, dropping them. “My kids were living in that house with a meth lab in the bedroom. Police came and called them out of the house with a blow horn. My daughter will always remember coming out of the house with police pointing guns at them.

“I would have liked to address the judge — let her know this guy’s really done a number on my kids.”

Scott County Attorney Mike Walton said Waack’s son is listed as a registered victim in the state’s case against Taylor but not Blumer. The reason, he said, is Taylor’s arrest came after the boy’s meth exposure was discovered.

“Blumer was subsequently charged with the additional counts, including child endangerment, but his case remained separate in both our file and the court file,” he said. “The victim registration in Taylor was never transferred over to Blumer’s file in our system.

“Admittedly, our focus in Blumer was on the Class B felony, manufacturing methamphetamine for which a conviction was obtained, plus convictions in three other class D felonies and a serious misdemeanor. Blumer has been sentenced to 25 years and could still go to prison on a 25-year sentence.”

Walton applauded the work of Assistant County Attorney Kelly Cunningham, who he said “consulted” with the parents of children in the day care in pursuing charges against Blumer.

Neither Waack nor Freddie Taylor ever heard of Cunningham, however, and said the only time they were contacted was when their subpoenas were canceled, following the guilty pleas. Cunningham was not available for comment.

On parole

The fact Blumer “could” go to prison, only if he violates terms of his parole, outrages Waack and Freddie Taylor.

“He served a total of 178 days, 11 hours, 16 minutes in the Scott County Jail, and the only reason he served that much time was because he was unable to post the bail,” Freddie Taylor said. “That little boy (Waack’s son) isn’t even my kid, and my eyes water up just thinking about it. I don’t know whether they were blowing that garbage (meth) in his face, but he obviously ingested it. That’s a kid.”

Amanda Taylor tested positive for methamphetamine, according to records maintained by the Department of Human Services. A positive result begins at 500 pg/mg (picograms per milligram), and she tested at 681 pg/mg.

Waack’s 4-year-old tested at 2,102 pg/mg.

She wonders whether Tabor would have granted Blumer probation if she knew the extent of the boy’s exposure to the drugs. She wrote the judge an email, asking, “If it were one of your children who tested positive for meth, would Dale Blumer be on the streets today?

“I understand you have to make tough decisions everyday, and I’m not angry. I’m brokenhearted, because I don’t feel you were thinking about my innocent 4-year-old.”

Tabor replied, “I acknowledge receipt of your email and can only say that I made my decision on information provided to me prior to the sentencing or at the hearing. I do not schedule sentencing dates, and the county attorney must give notice to any victims.”

Waack said the judge should have known there were victims, in part because the child-endangerment charge includes the words “meth exposure,” meaning a child was exposed.

“Did the judge not get a copy of the DHS report?” she asked. “What about the police reports? It is stated in the reports my 4-year-old son tested positive for meth.”

Waack has been notified by the county attorney of the July 11 sentencing of Amanda Taylor and already has written her victim-impact statement. Had she been notified of the Blumer sentencing and of her right to speak as a victim, she said, “My whole family would have written letters.”

Asked whether she noticed anything different about her son during the time he was exposed to methamphetamine, Waack began to cry.

“I wish I’d taken him out of there,” she said. “Why didn’t I take him out?

“As I look back, during that time, there was insomnia. I thought he was just fighting sleep or had a late nap. I took him into my room with me several times. One time, I woke up at 3 a.m., and he was still awake.”

Dangerous situation

Amanda Taylor has repeatedly denied using meth, telling Department of Human Services workers she tested positive from “hugging” Blumer, which transferred the drug from his pores to hers.

Freddie Taylor, who shared custody of his children, was given full custody, temporarily, after his ex-wife’s arrest. She was allowed only supervised visits until recently when she began seeing the kids alone, he said, adding he intends to pursue full custody, permanently.

“My oldest daughter complained of headaches to the point I was thinking maybe she was having migraines,” he said. “The DHS worker who went in the house after the arrest said she almost immediately got a headache. These things are terribly worrisome to me.”

Turning to Freddie Taylor, Waack said, “I feel bad for your kids, saying their mom should go to prison. It’s hard to say what’s fair for the two of them, prison-wise, because I’m a mom. I do know this man harmed my child and could’ve killed all those children. They could’ve all died.”

Freddie Taylor said it is difficult to consider how lucky his four children are, given they were living in a house with a meth lab that could have exploded at any time.

“I think Blumer thinks he got away with something,” he said.

Added Waack, “He did.”

 

 

 

 

 

http://qctimes.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/parents-criticize-sentence-for-day-care-meth-maker/article_e088fb1d-f80c-5096-903e-957d0f52fcf1.html?comment_form=true

 

Brownsville, Texas – U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the Gateway International Bridge discovered liquid methamphetamines valued at approximately $598,500 concealed within household goods being imported into the country.

On June 29, CBP officers at the Gateway International Bridge came in contact with a female driving a black 2010 Honda Civic. The female, identified as a 19-year-old United States citizen, who resides in Brownsville, was accompanied by an 18 year old woman also a United States citizen who resides in Louisville, Ky. Both women were referred for further inspection. CBP officers found packages of liquid methamphetamine hidden within various household product containers. The packages held a combined total weight of 39.9 pounds with an estimated street value of approximately $598,500

CBP officers turned the women over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement-Homeland Security Investigations (ICE-HSI) special agents for further investigation. CBP officers seized the narcotics and the vehicle.

“Vigilance on primary by our CBP officers has resulted in the discovery of these dangerous narcotics and the arrests of these alleged smugglers. I thank our CBP officers for their dedication, vigilance and for their hard work every day,” said Michael Freeman, CBP Port Director, Brownsville.

 

 

 

 

http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/newsroom/news_releases/local/07022013_2.xml

 

SAN DIEGO (CNS) – About $4.2 million worth of methamphetamine, $1.2  million in cocaine and two guns were seized at border checkpoints this week,  federal agents said Friday.

At San Ysidro on Tuesday, agents stopped a commercial minivan that was  in a bus lane at the border crossing, and a drug-sniffing dog alerted on 23  packages of cocaine hidden inside the fuel tank, according to CBP, who arrested  the 25-year-old driver, a U.S. citizen, and seized a loaded .22-caliber pistol.  His name was not made public.

At Otay Mesa on Monday, Customs and Border Protection agents searched a  Mazda Tribute and 161 packages of methamphetamine and two bundles of cocaine  secreted in door panels, ducting and inside a quarter panel, according to CBP.

The name of the 45-year-old Mexican citizen driving the vehicle was  withheld.

The value of the drugs was based on individual sale prices paid on the  streets in the United States.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.kusi.com/story/22769592/productive-week-for-border-patrol

 

 

A wheel alignment technician took a police car out for a test drive then videoed himself performing wheel spins, the New Plymouth District Court was told yesterday.

He then boasted of his feats to his mates and posted the videos on the internet.

When caught, Mark Robert West, 36, now unemployed, admitted stealing property from vehicles across the North Island which he sold to fund his methamphetamine habit.

Along with the car thefts, he pleaded guilty to sustained loss of traction and possession of a methamphetamine pipe.

However, West escaped a jail sentence yesterday after Judge Allan Roberts gave him credit for attending a residential drug and alcohol program and adhering to a 24-hour curfew prior to sentence.

The police summary says in June last year West was employed by Max Pennington Auto City in New Plymouth. The company is contracted to service and maintain police fleet vehicles.

On July 20, West was to perform a wheel alignment on a marked police patrol vehicle.

He first took the car for a road test, driving to Burgess Park. He put his cellphone on the ground and got in the car, twice recording himself heavily accelerating the police car and spinning the rear wheels until they smoked.

Back at the workshop he carried out the wheel alignment and this time drove the patrol car up Carrington Rd close to Pukeiti Gardens.

He again performed a skid, this time for 30-40m while smoke was pouring from the rear wheels.

During the drive back he drove erratically, again filming this on his cellphone while holding it in his hand.

Back at the workshop other workers noticed the patrol vehicle smelt of burnt rubber.

A short time later he left his job voluntarily.

On September 11, he was stopped by police and arrested for the skids. He told them he thought it would be “a bit of a laugh”.

When police searched the vehicle trying to find the cellphone with the video footage on it, they found under the driver’s seat a glass meth pipe wrapped in a woollen glove. They also found a large amount of stolen property.

West admitted he had been breaking into vehicles to fund his meth habit. Most of the offending was in New Plymouth but he also offended in the Bay of Plenty, Otorohanga, Morrinsville and Katikati.

West went on a drive around the city, showing police all the places he had stolen property.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/taranaki-daily-news/news/8885734/Man-admits-doing-donuts-in-cop-car

Summerville police busted a meth lab Thursday night at the Economy Inn hotel on Holiday Drive, authorities said.

Zachary Allen Kerr, 25, of Oakwood Avenue in Charleston, and Holly Earlene Mahon, 39, of Prestwick Court in Summerville, are both charged with manufacturing methamphetamine. Kerr faces an additional charge of simple possession of marijuana, police said.

Police officers were called to the hotel at 200 Holiday Drive shortly after 7 p.m. following a complaint of possible prostitution, an incident report states.

Holly Earlene Mahon (left) and Zachary Allen Kerr are both charged with manufacturing methamphetamine after Summerville police busted a meth lab at the Economy Inn hotel on Holiday Drive on July 4. Kerr faces an additional charge of simple possession of marijuana, police said

Officers approached Room 403 and saw a large amount of clothing hanging from a balcony rail.

Two men and two women were inside the room, which police said contained a strong odor of marijuana.

Mahon told officers that someone had smoked pot inside the room but that she made that person leave. However, officers noticed a clear plastic bag filled with the drug was lying on the bed, according to the report.

Kerr told officers that the pot belonged to him.

Police officers also found about 20 Pseudoephedrine pills, which Kerr reported he was taking to treat a cold. According to police, Kerr showed no signs of being sick.

A casserole dish was found on the bathroom floor with a burnt cloth draped over the top, the report states. A plastic bag with a metal cutter and two ice packs were also found in the sink.

Officers determined that the items were being used to make meth, police said.

The room was originally rented to Mahon but was later held under Kerr’s name, police said.

Mahon and Kerr are both being held at the Berkeley County jail, police said.

http://www.postandcourier.com/article/20130705/PC16/130709714/1009/meth-lab-discovered-at-a-summerville-hotel-police-say&source=RSS