RCMP have arrested four people at the Boonstock Music Festival in Sturgeon County.

Officials said members were on patrol in the festival campground early  Sunday when they noticed a suspicious vehicle.

“When they approached the vehicle a bag of drugs was thrown out of the  vehicle. The people inside were detained and the vehicle was searched,” Sgt.  Mark Mathias said.

After searching the vehicle, police said they found a loaded semi-automatic  handgun, a can of bear spray, cocaine, methamphetamine, marijuana and MDMA.

 

Boonstock, 2013

Police said they were better staffed to handle the amount of complaints at  this year’s Boonstock Music Festival near Gibbons

 

 

Three men and one woman were arrested without incident.

Police said this year they were better prepared to respond to calls at the  event.

“We can send teams to investigate matters right on the spot and get it dealt  with.”

As the festival grows, an estimated 12,000 to 15,000 expected this year,  organizers told CTV News they were pleased with how it all came together.

“I’m very grateful the way this event has been executed,” Colin Kobza  said.

“For the most part everybody has kept it together and taken care of  themselves.”

Sgt. Mathias said the final hurdle would be getting everyone on their way  Monday morning as Highway 28 and Highway 28A were congested over the festival  weekend.

“They were backed up for kilometres and that created some real serious safety  concerns.”

Police will be on site to help keep the traffic flowing but have advised  motorists there will likely be delays in the area.

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://edmonton.ctvnews.ca/four-arrested-at-boonstock-music-festival-1.1347756

 

Traffic stop leads to one of the largest methamphetamine seizures in Eureka

On Friday at approximately 12:32 p.m., an officer with the Eureka Police Department conducted a traffic stop on a vehicle for an observed traffic violation. The driver had multiple identifications and was found not to have a valid license to operate a motor vehicle. A K-9 unit from the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Department was summoned to the scene along with a detective with the Eureka Police Department’s POP unit. The K-9 alerted to the presence of narcotics inside the vehicle. As the officers on scene went to detain the driver he struggled with them and fled on foot. The driver was located and arrested a short distance later. The driver was identified as Alain Omar Carbrera-Madrigal, 28 years old.

 

Evidence seized by the Eureka Police Department in a Friday drug bust included approximately 6.6 pounds of crystal methamphetamine and over $170,000 in cash

 

During the search of the vehicle, officers located a hidden compartment and seized approximately 6 ounces of methamphetamine. Information was obtained which lead the Investigating Officer and POP Detective to an apartment on the 800 block of 8th Street in Eureka, which was rented and occupied by Carbrera-Madrigal. Officers made contact with a female suspect at the residence who was identified as Lizabeth Cabrera-Madrigal. She identified herself as Alain’s wife. Officer secured the apartment and obtained a search warrant to search the apartment.

During the search of the apartment officers located and seized approximately 6.6 pounds of crystal methamphetamine and over $170,000 in United States currency.

Alain was arrested and booked into Humboldt County jail on charges of resisting arrest with violence, transportation of methamphetamine, possession of methamphetamine for sale, possession of methamphetamine, providing a false name, and driving without a license. Alain is being held on an Immigration Hold.

Lizabeth was arrested and booked into the Humboldt County Correctional Facility on charges of possession of methamphetamine for sale and maintaining a residence for the distribution of a controlled substance.

Anyone with information concerning suspected drug activity, or other nuisances occurring in the City of Eureka is encouraged to call the Problem Oriented Policing Unit at 707-441-4373.

 

 

 

http://www.times-standard.com/breakingnews/ci_23571374/eureka-police-arrest-two-six-pound-meth-bust

 

 

Los Angele: The troubled Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines actor – who has struggled with substance abuse issues in the past – was reportedly taken into custody in the early hours of Friday after police allegedly found him using Methamphetamine at a Hollywood hotel. Nick’s latest brush with the law comes just one day after he claimed he was on the road to sobriety after spending time in hospital on an involuntary psychiatric hold.

“My recovery is going good. It’s a process… Things seems to be (looking up) and I’m just grateful,” he told TMZ on Tuesday.

Nick’s wife Rosie has reported him missing on several occasions and he checked into rehab last year to conquer his demons, only to quit and vanish again soon afterwards.
He was cleared of his most recent legal run-in, a charge for lewd conduct, in February after allegedly misbehaving while watching an adult movie in a Los Angeles porn store last year.

http://www.nation.com.pk/pakistan-news-newspaper-daily-english-online/entertainment/30-Jun-2013/stahl-arrested-on-drug-charges

SAN DIEGO — Children walk across the U.S.-Mexico border with crystal methamphetamine strapped to their backs or concealed between notebook pages. Motorists disguise liquid meth in tequila bottles, windshield washer containers and gas tanks.

The smuggling of the drug at land border crossings has jumped in recent years but especially at San Diego’s San Ysidro port of entry, which accounted for more than 40 percent of seizures in fiscal year 2012. That’s more than three times the second-highest — five miles east — and more than five times the third-highest, in Nogales, Ariz.

The spike reflects a shift in production to Mexico after a U.S. crackdown on domestic labs and the Sinaloa cartel’s new hold on the prized Tijuana-San Diego smuggling corridor.

A turf war that gripped Tijuana a few years ago with beheadings and daytime shootouts ended with the cartel coming out on top. The drugs, meanwhile, continue flowing through San Ysidro, the Western hemisphere’s busiest land border crossing with an average of 40,000 cars and 25,000 pedestrians entering daily.

Land of opportunities

“This is the gem for traffickers,” said Gary Hill, assistant special agent in charge of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration in San Diego. “It’s the greatest place for these guys to cross because there are so many opportunities.”

Customs and Border Protection officers seized 5,566 pounds of methamphetamine at San Ysidro in the 2012 fiscal year, more than double two years earlier, according to Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations unit. On the entire border, inspectors seized 13,195 pounds, also more than double.

 

Customs and Border Protection officer Steve Delgado looks at the dismembered dashboard of a Honda Accord after finding more than 14 pounds of methamphetamine hidden behind the radio at the San Ysidro port of entry Thursday in San Diego.

 Customs and Border Protection officer Steve Delgado looks at the dismembered dashboard of a Honda Accord after finding more than 14 pounds of methamphetamine hidden behind the radio at the San Ysidro port of entry Thursday in San Diego

 

San Ysidro — unlike other busy border crossings — blends into a sprawl of 18 million people that includes Los Angeles, one of the nation’s top distribution hubs. By contrast, El Paso is more than 600 miles from Dallas on a lonely highway with Border Patrol checkpoints.

During weekday mornings’ rush hour, thousands of motorists clog Tijuana streets to approach 24 U.S.-bound inspection lanes on their way to school or work. Vendors weave between cars, hawking cappuccinos, burritos, newspapers and trinkets.

A $732 million expansion that has created even longer delays may offer an extra incentive for smugglers who bet that inspectors will move people quickly to avoid criticism for hampering commerce and travel, said Joe Garcia, assistant special agent in charge of ICE investigations in San Diego.

 

‘ACHILLES’ AND ‘THE FROG’

Alfonzo “Achilles” Arzate and his younger brother Rene, known as “The Frog,” have emerged as top Sinaloa operatives in Tijuana — the former known as the brains and the latter as the brawn.  •  The elder Arzate has been mentioned on wire intercepts for drug deals as far as Chicago. •  He appears to have gained favor with the Sinaloa cartel brass after another cartel operative raided one of his warehouses in October 2010, leading to a shootout and the government seizing 134 tons of marijuana.

 

Kids paid for trafficking

Children are caught with methamphetamine strapped to their bodies several times a week — an “alarming increase,” according to Garcia. They are typically paid $50 to $200 for each trip, carrying 3 pounds on average.

Drivers, who collect up to $2,000 per trip, conceal methamphetamine in bumpers, batteries, radiators and almost any other crevice imaginable. Packaging is smothered with mustard, baby powder and laundry detergent to fool drug-sniffing dogs.

Crystals are increasingly dissolved in water, especially during the past year, making the drug more difficult to detect in giant X-ray scanners that inspectors order some motorists to drive through. The water is later boiled and often mixed with acetone, a combustible fluid used in paints that yields clear shards of methamphetamine favored by users. The drug often remains in liquid form until reaching its final distribution hub.

The government has expanded X-ray inspections of cars at the border in recent years, but increased production in Mexico and the Sinaloa cartel’s presence are driving the seizures, Garcia said.

“This is a new corridor for them,” he said.

The U.S. government shut large methamphetamine labs during the past decade as it introduced sharp limits on chemicals used to make the drug, causing production to shift to Mexico.

More seized labs

The U.S. State Department said in March that the Mexican government seized 958 labs under former President Felipe Calderon from 2006 to 2012, compared with 145 under the previous administration. Mexico seized 267 labs last year, up from 227 in 2011.

As production moved to central Mexico, the Sinaloa cartel found opportunity in Tijuana in 2008 when it backed a breakaway faction of the Arellano Felix clan, named for a family that controlled the border smuggling route for two decades. Sinaloa, led by Joaquin “Chapo” Guzman, had long dominated nearby in eastern California and Arizona.

Tijuana registered 844 murders in 2008 in a turf war that horrified residents with castrated bodies hanging from bridges. After the Sinaloa cartel prevailed, the Mexican border city of more than 2 million people returned to relative calm, with 332 murders last year and almost no public displays of brutality.

Methamphetamine has turned into a scourge throughout Tijuana, becoming the most common drug offense for dealers and consumers in the past five years, said Miguel Angel Guerrero, coordinator of the Baja California state attorney general’s organized crime unit.

“It has increased a lot in the city because it’s cheaper than cocaine, even cheaper than marijuana,” he said.

 

 

 

 

http://www.courierpostonline.com/viewart/20130630/NEWS05/306300043/Mexican-meth-streams-across-US-border

 

 

The Arcata Police Department snagged nearly 2 ounces of suspected heroin, about 5 grams of methamphetamine and items indicative of narcotics sales while conducting a traffic stop at the Best Western Arcata Inn on Valley West Boulevard.

At about 3:15 a.m. on Saturday, an APD officer pulled Sara Elizabeth Vickland, 33, of Arcata, over for an equipment violation at the Best Western, according to an APD press release. After contacting Vickland, the vehicle and everyone inside, including a man on active parole and a second man on post release community service, were searched.

Vickland was arrested on suspicion of possession for sales, transportation of a controlled substance and possession of a controlled substance, according to the release. She was transferred to the Humboldt County jail.

 

 

 

http://www.times-standard.com/news/ci_23570874/heroin-methamphetamine-seized-traffic-stop

 

 

A man is behind bars for operating a methamphetamine lab.  Deputies were alerted to suspected drug activity in the 4400 block of Verot School Road on Friday June 28th at around 6:30 PM.  Deputies responded and found an operational “shake and bake” type methamphetamine lab behind a home. 

  

 

Hazardous Materials Specialist with Lafayette Fire Department was called out to check for air quality and deputies secured the evidence.  Over 600 grams of methamphetamines was seized having a street value of $126,900.00.  Deputies arrested Marcus Hebert who is 25 years-old, he is resident of the 4400 block of Verot School Road he is facing charges of possession with intent to distribute over 600 grams of methamphetamines, and three counts of the operating a clandestine laboratory.  Bond has been set at $300,000.00.
Deputies are continuing their investigation.

 

 

 

http://www.katc.com/news/one-arrested-in-methamphetamine-lab-bust-in-lafayette/

 

 

 

With a knife to her throat, Cheryl Perez pleaded with her son

“Jason, come on,” she said with all the calm she could muster. With a free hand, she reached for the phone next to her and dialed 911.

Jason Isaac Page, 26, closed the knife and walked around the chair to face his mother.

“Fine, I’ll do myself,” he said to her. Again, she pleaded with him.

“Come on, I don’t want to bury you,” she told him. Page began to break down. With sadness in his eyes, he looked at her.

“I want help. I want help,” he said.

Then police arrived and took Page away in handcuffs. It was a shocking event for the mother of a methamphetamine-addicted son, but she saw it coming.

Cheryl Perez

One mother’s story: Cheryl Perez has spent the last few years dealing with her son’s methamphetamine addiction. She hopes that by telling her story, she can let her community know that families dealing with the stress of addiction are not alone

 

 

 

■ Downward spiral    

For Perez, Klamath County’s problem with methamphetamine addiction has become a real experience not typically told in headlines and court documents. She has witnessed how the drug has torn through her son’s life and brought crime to her neighborhood.

    She also has experienced the downward spiral for low income, uninsured addicts.

    It began when Page was a boy, Perez said. After separating with her husband, Perez would later find out that Page had started drinking at the age of 10. Alcohol was his gateway to marijuana, heroin and eventually methamphetamine, she said.

    Page moved to Portland in his 20s to live with his brother. That’s when Perez thinks Page began using. In Portland, relatives began noticing strange behaviors. Page once hung sheets to separate a living room into four parts so he could rent the space.

    He then moved to Klamath Falls, where he began stealing for drug money, Perez said. Page would take his girlfriend’s disability benefits and use the money to buy drugs,she said. The downward spiral all led to the night Page came over begging for food.

    Perez could tell he was coming down. He showed up at Perez’s apartment asking for food. She wouldn’t let him in at first, but he began yelling outside her door. Eventually she let him in and gave him a peanut butter and jelly sandwich and milk.

    She sat in the chair as he ate, waiting for him to finish. He pulled out a knife and said, “It’s time.”

■ Recovery a tough road

    The exits from addiction are difficult for low-income, uninsured drug  users. Transformations Wellness Center provides four indigent beds for two men and two women; anyone unable to pay can utilize the residential treatment center for no cost.

    But the waiting list is at least six months long. Executive Director Sandy Boatright said most clients seeking transformations’ services cannot pay.

    “Being the only nonprofit provider in the county, we swallow the cost. But we still need money to run,” Boatright said.

    Boatright recommends people without insurance begin with the Oregon Health Plan. Low-income Oregonians can apply for the plan online.

    From there, she recommends they utilize local services like Narcotics Anonymous, the Klamath Crisis Center and Klamath Youth Development Center.

■ Vicious cycle

    Perez hopes she can stop the vicious cycle of addiction that is tearing her son apart. Page is being held at the Klamath County Jail on numerous charges.

    Regretfully sought a restraining order on Page, but said is necessary. After having a mental breakdown because of the stress her son has caused her, she hopes he can be sent to a state hospital for treatment.

    “Deep down, he’s a loving child,” she said.

 

 

 

http://www.heraldandnews.com/members/news/frontpage/article_29779224-e07f-11e2-89a5-001a4bcf887a.html

 

 

MADISON — A Norfolk man who relapsed on methamphetamine borrowed money from his sister to get the drug. The two used all day until she winded up in the hospital, treated for meth intoxication.

But Brian Dieter, 34, said he didn’t encourage his sister to use and that she was incarcerated herself for possession of methamphetamine.

 The investigation began after his sister, Karina, 41, was released from Faith Regional Health Services following the incident March 7. She told law enforcement that she had gone to her brother’s apartment in Norfolk that day at 2 a.m. and that he talked her into giving him money.

According to a law enforcement report, she said her brother used the money to purchase meth and that they used the drug together with others at the apartment. In the 18 hours she was there, she gave him money at least three times and each time he would return to the apartment with more drugs.

Along with possession of meth from that incident, Dieter also was convicted of two shoplifting incidents from Menards. According to court reports, he stole copper wire, surveillance cameras and an oxygen bottle, totaling more than $1,100.

Dieter said that at the time of the thefts, he was off his medications and started doing drugs again.

“I never meant for this to happen,” he said. “I’ve been sober 112 days now and I’m feeling good.”

But during those 112 days in jail awaiting sentencing on those convictions, Dieter got into a fight with another inmate, hitting him in the nose. The inmate did not require medical treatment, but Dieter was convicted of another felony in regard to the fight.

Judge Mark Johnson pointed out Dieter’s extensive criminal history — seven pages of priors — including 12 other theft or trespassing charges. Johnson called the Menards’ thefts “brazen” and “very thought out.”

But Dieter’s lawyer, Kyle Melia of the Madison County public defender’s office, said the recent thefts were related to his drug use. And while his drug use with his sister was legally defined as dealing, Dieter wasn’t going out and selling the drug.

Ultimately, Johnson sentenced Dieter to one year in prison for the meth and theft charges and an additional 30 days in jail for the assault while incarcerated.

He was given credit for 112 days already served.

 

 

 

http://norfolkdailynews.com/news/sibling-meth-use-thefts-assault-nets-norfolk-man-prison-term/article_77e12144-e0c7-11e2-84b6-001a4bcf6878.html

 

A 31-year-old Odessa man faces police accusations that he threw bags of methamphetamine out of a car window during a Thursday traffic stop.

Police say Cyril Desmond Howe failed to use a turn signal at about 3:40 p.m. in the 2600 block North County Road West.

Cyril Howe

Cyril Desmond Howe

 

As officers pulled him over in his Pontiac Gran Prix, Howe threw bags and undisclosed paraphernalia from the window, according to a police report. The report states the bags contained less than one gram of methamphetamine.

Howe, 3717 Holly Ave., was arrested and charged with felony tampering with evidence and possession of methamphetamine. He was being held Friday at Ector County Detention Center on a total $22,500 bond.

 

 

http://www.oaoa.com/news/crime_justice/law_enforcement/article_92d5c162-e03b-11e2-b162-0019bb30f31a.html

On Friday, members of the Saraland Police Department Narcotics Unit executed a search warrant at 5315 Daniel Dr., Satsuma, Alabama. During the execution of the search warrant investigators seized an active methamphetamine lab, three inactive methamphetamine labs, components used to manufacture methamphetamines, methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia.

 
  
 
 
 
 

 

Arrested as a result of the warrant were Thomas J. Kelly 42, from Satsuma, AL on the charges of Trafficking Methamphetamines, Manufacturing a Controlled Substance (Meth) and Unlawful Possession of a Drug Paraphernalia, Wendy P. Alford 41, from Mobile, AL on the charges of Unlawful Possession of a Controlled Substance (meth) and Unlawful Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Karen Hearn 48, from Axis, AL on the charged with Unlawful Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.

 

 

 

http://www.wkrg.com/story/22722492/three-arrested-at-active-meth-lab-in-Satsuma

 

PHOENIX (AP) — A doctor surgically removed a one-pound package of methamphetamine from a woman’s pelvic area after she allegedly tried to smuggle the drugs into Arizona from Mexico, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection spokeswoman said Friday.

Claudia Ibarra, 31, was taken into custody this week at the Port of San Luis after federal officers suspected the bizarre smuggle attempt. She crossed the border alone and on foot and is a U.S. citizen from the border city of Yuma.

 

Ibarra was searched at the border and then transported to a nearby medical facility where the doctor found and removed the drug package. She was stopped after exhibiting common signs of potential drug smuggling, said spokeswoman Teresa Small, who declined to elaborate.

“When they were patting her down, they realized there was something down there,” Small said.

The methamphetamine had been wrapped in black tape and a condom and inserted into Ibarra’s body. She was turned over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations.

Officials said it is not unusual for narcotics smugglers to hide drugs inside human bodies, either by swallowing the package or through other means. A medical official was tasked with removing the package because exposure to the methamphetamine could have killed Ibarra.

It was not known if she had an attorney or had previously been arrested on drug smuggling charges.

http://www.sfgate.com/news/crime/article/Feds-Woman-hid-pound-of-meth-inside-pelvic-area-4633922.php

BAKERSFIELD, Calif. (KBAK/KBFX) —  The Kern County Sheriff’s Office said Friday that it arrested two men in an undercover methamphetamine operation.

The investigation launched early this month, and 34-year-old Jorge Guevara, of Arvin, was subsequently identified as a drug-dealing suspect, the sheriff’s office said.

An undercover detective was able to negotiate the purchase of multiple pounds of methamphetamine from Guevara, the department said.

Sheriff's office: 2 busted with 17 pounds of meth

Seized methamphetamine is seen following the arrests of 34-year-old Jorge Guevara and 45-year-old Jerardo Villareal in an undercover drug operation in Bakersfield and Arvin, Calif

 

A meeting was set up Wednesday afternoon in a south Bakersfield parking lot, off the 2600 block of Panama Lane, so the undercover detective could “buy” the drugs from Guevara, who was accompanied by 45-year-old Jerardo Villareal.

Both men were arrested during the sting operation, and officers found 17 pounds of packaged methamphetamine in the men’s possession, the sheriff’s office said.

A search warrant was served later at Guevara’s home on the 1900 block of Flores Court in Arvin, and detectives found an additional pound of methamphetamine and evidence of narcotics sales, the department said.

The seized methamphetamine has an approximate street value of $817,200, according to the sheriff’s office.

 

 

 

http://www.bakersfieldnow.com/news/local/Sheriffs-office-2-busted-with-17-pounds-of-meth-213596191.html

 

 

Cortlandville, NY — Authorities charged three people Friday after an expansive methamphetamine lab was discovered in their Cortlandville home, the Cortland County Sheriff’s Department said.

Arvin L. Strauf, 51, and Catherine A. Glave, 28, both of 143 Penguin Drive, were each charged with third-degree unlawful manufacturing of methamphetamine, first-degree criminally using drug paraphernalia, unlawful disposal of of methamphetamine laboratory material, criminal possession of precursors of methamphetamine and third-degree criminal possession of a weapon.

Arvin L. Strauf Jr., 19, of 143 Penguin Drive, was charged with third-degree unlawful manufacturing of methamphetamine, unlawful disposal of methamphetamine laboratory material and criminal possession of precursors of methamphetamine.

Deputies conducted an investigation into the sale and manufacture of methamphetamine and executed a search warrant at 143 Penguin Drive on Friday, the sheriff’s department said.

Items used for making methamphetamine, a switch blade and five one-pot methamphetamine labs were seized.

The state police Contaminated Crime Scene Emergency Response Team and the Environmental Protection Service assisted, and a Cortlandville firetruck stood by during the investigation.

All three people charged were arraigned in Cortlandville Town Court. Arvin L. Strauf Jr. was remanded to the Cortland County jail in lieu of $500 cash bail or $1,000 bond. Catherine A. Glave was remanded to the county jail on $5,000 cash bail or $10,000 bond. Arvin L. Strauf was reamanded to the county jail without bail.

 

 

 

 

http://www.syracuse.com/news/index.ssf/2013/06/cortland_meth_bust_police.html

 

ST. GEORGE — Four Washington County residents were arrested Thursday after a traffic stop uncovered “large” amounts of methamphetamine.

Washington County Drug Task Force detectives pulled over a silver F-150 pickup truck Thursday afternoon with three occupants: Joshua Bradyn Blake, 18; Joshua David Samson, 24; and Amber Nicole Turney, 23. As officers approached the vehicle, they noticed passengers moving and reaching for something inside the vehicle, according to probable cause statements.

Officers asked the occupants to roll down the windows, and a smell of “burnt marijuana” came from inside the vehicle, according to the statements. Officers then asked Blake, Samson and Turney to exit the vehicle.

A glass pipe with crystal-like residue and a sealed straw with “granulated type material inside” was found on Turney, according to the statements. When questioned by detectives, Turney said she had driven Blake to Las Vegas to “pick up meth.”

Investigators also found paraphernalia, a plastic bottle with suspected marijuana and a “distributable amount” of suspected methamphetamine inside the vehicle.

Blake told officers he was going to meet 21-year-old Tyler Jordan Oliphant after picking up the methamphetamine.

“(Blake) explained … that the majority of the methamphetamine was going to be dropped off to (Oliphant) so that (Oliphant) could start selling,” according to the statement.

Officers had Blake set up a meeting over the phone with Oliphant. During that meeting Oliphant was arrested.

“(Oliphant) explained to me that Josh had just made a trip to Las Vegas to pick up a quarter pound of meth and was meeting up with him in order to give him his cut,” the officer wrote in the statement.

Blake, Samson, Turney and Oliphant were all booked into Purgatory Correctional Facility.

Blake was charged with possession of drugs with the intent to distribute, possession of drugs, two charges of possession of paraphernalia and five warrants. Blake’s bail was set at $21,047.

Samson and Turney were charged with possession of drugs, possession of drugs with the intent to distribute and two charges of possession of paraphernalia. Their bail was set at $11,761 each.

Oliphant was charged with possession of drugs with the intent to distribute. Oliphant’s bail was set at $10,000.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.thespectrum.com/article/20130628/NEWS01/306280013/4-arrested-on-drug-distribution-charges?nclick_check=1

 

ST. ALBANS — Police have made an arrest in connection with a St. Albans methamphetamine lab that was dismantled Thursday in a residential area.

Travis Clemmons, 30, of St. Louis initially was jailed for lack of $75,000 bail, Vermont State Police Capt. Dan Troidl said.

Judge James Crucitti increased bail to $150,000 after Clemmons appeared Friday in Vermont Superior Court in St. Albans to answer a charge of conspiracy to manufacture methamphetamine. Clemmons denied the felony charge.

Police were looking for Clemmons since they raided an apartment house at 69 North Elm St. in St. Albans and uncovered evidence of a meth lab, state police said.

Investigators received information that Clemmons was at a hotel in St. Albans. Before police he fled the area, but about 1:40 a.m. State Police found him hiding in a drainage ditch near the hotel.

He was arrested and transported to the Vermont State Police Barracks in St. Albans and lodged at the Northwest State Correctional Facility in St. Albans Town.

Troidl said there might be more arrests, and the investigation remains in progress.

He said police worked nonstop for about 48 hours to get enough evidence for a search warrant, to conduct the raid and to find the suspect.

Nobody was home when state, local and federal law-enforcement officers raided the North Elm Street residence at about 3:30 p.m. Thursday, officials said.

“We definitely removed evidence. There was evidence of a meth lab,” said Troidl, who oversees the state’s special investigations division.

He said the site was made safe after investigators removed chemicals used in making the drug, documented them as evidence and disposed of them.

St. Albans Police Chief Gary Taylor said the city police and fire departments offered support during the raid because of the hazardous nature of a meth lab. The Swanton Police Department also assisted.

The State Police Bomb Squad and Hazardous Materials Response Team were both summoned to the scene. State police Lt. Reg Trayah, commander of the state’s clandestine lab team, has said those teams are now automatically called because of the dangerous nature of the materials.

 

 

 

 

http://www.burlingtonfreepress.com/article/20130628/NEWS07/306280018/Arrest-made-in-St-Albans-meth-lab-case?nclick_check=1

 

 

YORK – “We are seeing substance abuse issues rising in York County,” said Carl Knieriem, director of the local Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA).

“Methamphetamine use is more prevalent again. It had been dramatically reduced, but now it’s once again on the rise.”

Knieriem, along with CASA board member and volunteer, Dale Kahla, addressed the York County Commissioners this past week, regarding their annual report.

Because of the increase in drug abuse, the number of abused and neglected children is also on the rise.

Knieriem said 58 such children were in the court system in 2011. The number rose to 68 children in 2012.

“And, although it’s only June and we are only half-way through the year, there are already 56 children in the system,” Knieriem said.

“We’d like to think that no more children will be coming into the system this year, but there’s six months left to go and unfortunately, there will likely be more.”

“What I’ve seen is that substance abuse (by parents) and poverty seem to be the situations that get these kids in these situations,” Kahla said.

“We need to stop the cycle – for example, in one case, both parents had grown up in the system and here we go again with the next generation. If we can stop the abuse and neglect, we could stop the cycle.”

The good news is that the number of CASA volunteers is rising in York County. These volunteers become the “voices” for these children, going with them through the process and helping them toward having safe and permanent homes. There are currently 18 active advocates and five who are now in training.

While 21 children have court-appointed advocates, 35 do not.

“The number of those who don’t have an advocate is still way too high,” Knieriem said. “But we are encouraged because we are getting more volunteers.

“And many are younger so their potential of being with us for a longer period of time is higher,” Kahla said. “That is really exciting.”

Knieriem told the commissioners a story about one of the local children who are being served by CASA – noting that she changed his name to protect his identity.

“Charlie, now 13 years old, after suffering from severe abuse and neglect as a young child, continues to suffer from mental illness, occasional negative effects of medication changes, behavior issues and multiple moves,” she said.

“He is now in his 12th placement since 2006. Huge efforts have been made to care for Charlie, and to provide permanency for him, including efforts to reunify him with his biological mother and separately with his biological father.

“I cannot count the number of Health and Human Services workers that have been assigned to be Charlie’s case manager,” Knieriem said. “What Charlie does have are dedicated legal parties – York County Court, the county attorney and the guardian ad litem. Now even the judge has changed but this court system knows Charlie’s history and continues to do its best on Charlie’s behalf.

“Charlie is also fortunate to have his CASA advocate (since 2009) and a ‘grandma’ figure who provides a consistent presence of nurturing and care to Charlie. These people and entities are the only permanency in Charlie’s life.

From 2009-11, he resided in the Grand Island area. From 2011-13 he resided in Omaha. This month, he was temporarily placed at a group home in North Platte, meaning more placements in the future. The CASA advocate has been driving hundreds of miles to these places on a monthly basis to see Charlie, attend team meetings and to advocate for his needs.”

Knieriem says that both national and state statistics verify that a child served by a CASA volunteer spends on average four to five months fewer in care than a foster child without a CASA volunteer. She said that children without CASA volunteers re-enter the system at a rate of 16 percent, whereas recidivism for children with a CASA volunteer is “astonishingly low,” between 1.4 and 1.9 percent.

“This is not only a huge benefit to the children and families we serve, but our work saves our county, state and nation a huge amount of money,” Knieriem said.

The local CASA entity operates on financial contributions from the county, grant money and private contributions.

Knieriem said CASA is asking the county for an annual contribution of $30,375 – which is a 3 percent increase over last year’s contribution.

York County Attorney Candace Dick said she “obviously supports the program,” and Mitch Doht, the county’s highway superintendent, added that “as a foster parent, I know what a great program CASA is. It is really important and really wonderful.”

The commissioners thanked Kahla, Knieriem, their volunteers and board members – noting that they would take the financial request under consideration as the budget is formulated for the new fiscal year.

 

 

 

 

http://www.yorknewstimes.com/news/casa-director-meth-use-more-prevalent/article_c0559f60-e070-11e2-989d-001a4bcf887a.html

 

CAPE CORAL, Fla.- Cape Coral Police arrested Dawnette Eash, 30, on charges of trafficking methamphetamine, manufacturing methamphetamine within 1,000 feet of a preschool and manufacturing methamphetamine with children present.

Cape Coral Narcotics Detectives executed a search warrant at Eash’s home at 3619 Country Club Blvd at 5:00 p.m. Once inside, detectives discovered materials used to cook meth along with 33.5 ounces of the drug. Detectives also found four children inside of the home.

Dawnette Eash admitted to detectives that she manufactures the drug in the home and was arrested and taken to the Lee County Jail.

DCF responded and took custody of the children, who have been placed with relatives.

An environmental services company also responded and removed hazardous waste from the home.

 

 

 

http://www.winknews.com/Local-Florida/2013-06-28/Woman-accused-of-manufacturing-meth-in-the-presence-of-kids

 

 

LCSO nabs multiple drug suspects in two days of action

 

Narcotics investigators were busy this week taking down alleged drug dealers who they said were harboring marijuana, methamphetamine labs and the methamphetamine precursors. The arrests stemmed from three separate incidents, according to the Sheriff’s Office. Investigators said they uncovered roughly 30 one-pot labs Thursday afternoon inside a Bob Cook Road home and at an abandoned residence, both in Maiden. The incident has been hailed the largest bust of its kind in the county this year, Narcotics Lieutenant Jason Reid said.

Ray Gora / Lincoln Times-News Lincoln County narcotics officers work to neutralize toxic sludge that was left over from the methamphetamine manufacturing process.

 Lincoln County narcotics officers work to neutralize toxic sludge that was left over from the methamphetamine manufacturing process

 

Deputies charged 42-year-old James Christopher Coleman, of 135 Bob Cook Road, with a felony count of manufacturing a schedule II controlled substance. During a search of the area, investigators also located remnants of labs inside the crawl space of a boarded-up house behind Coleman’s residence. Officers said they went to the home earlier that afternoon to do a “knock-and-talk” with Coleman and spotted items used to make the drug. Officials with the State Bureau of Investigation assisted the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office with cleaning up the chemicals.

The process took several hours. North 321 Fire Department assisted the scene due to the presence of flammable materials. Deputies said with the threat of storms Thursday, they were afraid to mix the chemicals with rain and spark an explosion. With investigators busting a large number of labs in recent months, Lincoln County officers have shutdown more methamphetamine operations already in 2013 than in previous years. Reid credited the high volume of discovered labs to Sheriff David Carpenter’s willingness to give the narcotics unit the freedom to be creative. “Our investigators have figured out a way to aggressively work meth labs,” he said. He also anticipated more busts in the future. Coleman said he was not making or using methamphetamine. He said the labs belonged to individuals who were previously living with him.

Archdale resident Tony Mohammad could not believe the extent of drug activity taking place next door. “You mean my life’s been in danger all this time, and I didn’t even know,” he said. “I had no idea he (Coleman) was doing what he was doing.” Bob Cook resident Sabir Jeelani, who lives across the street from Coleman, rushed out with his wife Thursday to view the commotion after spotting live news footage of their street on television. He said people have frequently moved in and out of the suspect’s house, never staying for more than 20 days at a time. Coleman is being held without bond in the Harven A. Crouse Detention Center with a first appearance set for today.

In an unrelated incident earlier on Thursday, deputies handcuffed two men, including a teen, after officers said they witnessed the suspects carrying out a drug transaction at the One Stop convenience store on West Main Street in Lincolnton. Investigators were at the business conducting surveillance of the area at the time of the transaction, the Sherriff’s Office said. After watching the hand-to-hand drug deal, deputies said they approached the suspects’ vehicles and searched them, seizing four small bags of marijuana. Aaron Marsh McCoy, 24, of 1801 George Brown Road in Crouse, and Dustin Alexander Lineberger, 17, of 6533 Lineberger Road in Sherrills Ford, were taken into custody.

McCoy faces one felony count each of possession with intent to manufacture, sell and deliver a schedule VI controlled substance, sell and deliver a schedule VI controlled substance and maintaining a vehicle for a controlled substance. He also faces one misdemeanor count of possession of drug paraphernalia. Lineberger is charged with one misdemeanor count of simple possession of marijuana. Each has since been released from the county jail, McCoy on an $8,000 secured bond and Lineberger on a $500 secured bond.

In an unrelated incident on Wednesday, deputies spotted and stopped a suspicious-looking vehicle on U.S. 321 while again conducting surveillance, an agency report said. During the traffic stop, investigators arrested three men after seizing items from the vehicle that they said are commonly used to produce methamphetamine. Anthony Scott Plude, 27, of 1635 19th Street SW in Hickory, Johnny Paul Franklin, 42, of 2999 South Highway 321, and Colby Ray Williams, 29, of 4692 Flay Road, both in Lincolnton, are each charged with one felony count of possession of a meth precursor. All three suspects remain in the Harven A. Crouse Detention Center, each under a $20,000 secured bond.

 

 

 

http://www.lincolntimesnews.com/?p=63140

 

 

GREENVILLE, SC — Twenty-four people have been charged with drug crimes in connection with an Upstate methamphetamine ring in a 30-count indictment released Friday by the state Attorney General’s office.

Each person named in the indictment is charged with one count each of conspiracy to traffic 400 or more grams of methamphetamine. If convicted of the felony, each person faces 25 to 30 years behind bars and could also pay a $200,000 fine. Several members of the alleged conspiracy also face charges ranging from drug charges such as distribution of methamphetamine and exposing a child to methamphetamine to other offenses, including possession of a firearm during the commission of a violent crime and resisting arrest.

The names of the people named in the indictment are: Alex “Fatman” Lnu, David “Migo” Martinez, Darrell “DJ” Foster McCoy Jr., Matthew David McCoy, Wesley Scott Wright, Lauren Ashley Kuykendall, Benny “Lil’ B” Alexander, Douglas “Dougie” Rhodes, Michael “Mike Mike” Duane Payne, Tony Eugene McCoy, Maria Summer Cromer, Timothy “Superman” Bryan Cartee, Warren Chastain, Regina “Dirty” Gambrel” Charles “Bub” Caldwell Jr., Corey Dalton Crump, Tommy “Tommy Gun” Waters, Johnny Banks, Jessica Velez Boleman and Michael “Paul Wall” Perino Pardi.

The case was investigated by sheriff’s departments in Anderson, Greenville, Pickens counties; the Easley Police Department; and the State Law Enforcement Division. The case will be prosecuted by the state Attorney General’s Office.

On June 25, narcotics detectives and deputies assisted the probation/parole department with a search of 174 Corbett McNeil Road in Boone, in reference to a narcotics investigation.

Detectives located precursors used in the process to manufacture methamphetamine, as well as a methamphetamine lab.  The meth lab discovered was a 20 ounce bottle located in the burn pile outside the residence.  The occupants of the residence attempted to burn the “Shake and Bake” lab in an effort to destroy any evidence that they were manufacturing methamphetamine.  Also located during the search were five HCL gas generators, which is used in the final stages of meth manufacturing, and items of drug paraphernalia.

 

Matthew Jack Huskins, 27, and Aimee Melissa Simpson, 37, both of 174 Corbett McNeil Road, were charged with Manufacture Methamphetamine, Possession of Meth Precursors, and Maintaining a Dwelling.

Huskins and Simpson are currently being held at the Watauga County Detention Facility in lieu of a $150,000 secured bond.  Both are scheduled to appear in District Court on July 29, 2013.

 

 

 

http://www.hcpress.com/crime-reports/two-residents-of-boone-arrested-for-meth-shake-and-bake-lab-found-on-corbett-mcneil-road.html

 

 

Terminator 3 star Nick Stahl has been arrested yet again for methamphetamine!

Just two weeks after being admitted for a 5150 psychiatric hold, the drug-addled actor was cuffed and thrown behind bars after cops busted him in a Hollywood motel with three people reportedly all doping up on the crystal.

The worst part?? Cops only took a trip to the motel for a parole compliance check up for one of Nick’s pals.

Talk about bad luck.

nick stahl arrest methamphetamine

 

Besides his psych hold, the troubled actor has checked in and out of rehab, was searched by police, was seen trying to buy drugs, was reported missing twice, was arrested and was caught masturbating in public — and that’s just over the past two years!

Here’s to hoping Nick’s luck AND his recovery FINALLY make a quick turn around.

Unfortunately, if this last arrest doesn’t turn Nick around then we don’t know what will save him!

 

 

 

http://perezhilton.com/2013-06-28-nick-stahl-drug-possession-methamphetamine-arrest

 

 

Two men have been arrested after visiting numerous city pharmacies to stock up on pseudoephedrine, a key ingredient to the production of methamphetamine, Kingsport police reported.

Other precursors allegedly were located in their vehicle, including tanks of Coleman fuel and lithium batteries, along with a small stash of the finished product.

d828bc85877e9f2e018ebdf47fba7ba8

Brandon Brown, left, and Cody Jeffers

 

KPD Vice Det. Nathan Elliott said an employee of a city pharmacy alerted police to the suspicious purchases on Monday night. Multiple individuals allegedly were going from pharmacy to pharmacy, with each person purchasing a package of allergy medication containing pseudoephedrine.

“We always appreciate pharmacy and store personnel for going beyond their tasks and alerting us,” Elliott said.

Police said they were provided a description of the suspects’ van, which they soon located at Walgreens, 4500 West Stone Drive. Elliott said police observed two of the suspects purchasing additional boxes of pseudoephedrine before approaching their vehicle.

While speaking with police, the driver, Cody Jeffers, 23, of 329 Ensor Road, Church Hill, allegedly attempted to stuff a small package between his seat and console. The package later was discovered to contain a small amount of meth, police said. Jeffers was arrested and charged with tampering with evidence and possession of methamphetamine.

Another occupant of the van, Brandon Brown, 28, of 921 Elizabeth St., Kingsport, was allegedly found in possession of “multiple packs” of pseudoephedrine. Police said he also had other materials needed for meth production, prompting a charge of initiating the process to manufacture methamphetamine.

KPD detectives were continuing to investigate the incident with additional charges pending.

 

 

 

http://timesnews.net/article/9064260/kpd-two-arrested-while-making-pharmacy-run-for-meth-supplies

 

 

Police arrested a man on drug charges before he was allegedly attempting to  sale fake drugs.

A police report said that a 2008 Kia Rio driven by Joshua David Brawner, 28,  was stopped at a traffic safety checkpoint at about 2:29 a.m. Wednesday when  Officer Michael Carter found that his license had been suspended.

 

Man arrested for meth posession at checkpoint

 

Brawner was then placed under arrest and a search of Brawner revealed a bag  containing suspected methamphetamine in a pocket of his jeans and another bag  containing an unknown substance of what appeared to Carter to be methamphetamine  in another pocket, along with several empty bags commonly used to package  narcotics.

Officers found a set of digital scales in the vehicle and and text messages  in Brawner’s cell phone indicating the sale of illicit narcotics.

The substance in the bag tested negative for methamphetamine in a field test.  When asked what the substance was and why it was packaged similar to  methamphetamine, Brawner allegedly said it was Epson salt, and he was unsure how  much he was going to sell the “fake methamphetamine” for because he had not  weighed it.

Brawner allegedly admitted to selling methamphetamine and admitted that the  imitation methamphetamine was to be sold, the police report said.

While en route to the Troup County Jail, Brawner complained of shortness of  breath before claiming he had eaten one gram of methamphetamine and injected one  gram of it just before police contact.

He was treated at West Georgia Health and is being held at the Troup County  Jail on charges of possession of methamphetamine possession of imitation drugs  and driving on suspended license.

 

 

 

http://www.lagrangenews.com/view/full_story/22995936/article-Man-arrested-for-meth-posession-at-checkpoint

 

 

Salton City, California – On Friday, El Centro Sector Border Patrol agents assigned to the Indio Station apprehended a suspected narcotics smuggler at the Highway 86 checkpoint and seized 8.5 pounds of methamphetamine.

The incident occurred at approximately 2:40 p.m., when a 22-year-old female driver approached the Border Patrol checkpoint located between Westmorland and Salton City. A canine detection team alerted to a 1999 Chrysler Cirrus as it approached the primary inspection lane. The vehicle was referred to secondary inspection where agents discovered 16 packages of methamphetamine concealed within the back seat of the vehicle.

The methamphetamine had a combined weight of 8.5 pounds and an estimated street value of more than $272,000. The female driver, a United States citizen, was taken into custody. The woman, vehicle, and contraband were turned over to the Drug Enforcement Administration for further investigation.

 

 

 

 

http://www.imperialvalleynews.com/index.php/news/imperial-valley/4749-el-centro-sector-border-patrol-uncovers-272-000-worth-of-methamphetamine-at-checkpoint.html

SAN DIEGO — Children walk across the U.S.-Mexico border with crystal methamphetamine strapped to their backs or concealed between notebook pages. Motorists disguise liquid meth in tequila bottles, windshield washer containers and gas tanks.

The smuggling of the drug at land border crossings has jumped in recent years but especially at San Diego’s San Ysidro port of entry, which accounted for more than 40 percent of seizures in fiscal year 2012. That’s more than three times the second-highest — five miles east — and more than five times the third-highest, in Nogales, Ariz.

 

The spike reflects a shift in production to Mexico after a U.S. crackdown on domestic labs and the Sinaloa cartel’s new hold on the prized Tijuana-San Diego smuggling corridor.
A turf war that gripped Tijuana a few years ago with beheadings and daytime shootouts ended with the cartel coming out on top. The drugs, meanwhile, continue flowing through San Ysidro, the Western hemisphere’s busiest land border crossing with an average of 40,000 cars and 25,000 pedestrians entering daily.

“This is the gem for traffickers,” said Gary Hill, assistant special agent in charge of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration in San Diego. “It’s the greatest place for these guys to cross because there are so many opportunities.”

Customs and Border Protection officers seized 5,566 pounds of methamphetamine at San Ysidro in the 2012 fiscal year, more than double two years earlier, according to Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations unit. On the entire border, inspectors seized 13,195 pounds, also more than double.

From October 2012 through March, seizures totaled 2,169 pounds at San Ysidro and 1,730 pounds at Otay Mesa, giving San Diego 61 percent of the 6,364 pounds seized at Mexican border crossings. Much of the rest was found in Laredo, Texas; Nogales; and Calexico, Calif.

San Ysidro — unlike other busy border crossings — blends into a sprawl of 18 million people that includes Los Angeles, one of the nation’s top distribution hubs. By contrast, El Paso is more than 600 miles from Dallas on a lonely highway with Border Patrol checkpoints.

Rush-hour comes weekday mornings, with thousands of motorists clogging Tijuana streets to approach 24 U.S.-bound inspection lanes on their way to school or work. Vendors weave between cars, hawking cappuccinos, burritos, newspapers and trinkets.

A $732 million expansion that has created even longer delays may offer an extra incentive for smugglers who bet that inspectors will move people quickly to avoid criticism for hampering commerce and travel, said Joe Garcia, assistant special agent in charge of ICE investigations in San Diego.

Children are caught with methamphetamine strapped to their bodies several times a week — an “alarming increase,” according to Garcia. They are typically paid $50 to $200 for each trip, carrying 3 pounds on average.

Drivers, who collect up to $2,000 per trip, conceal methamphetamine in bumpers, batteries, radiators and almost any other crevice imaginable. Packaging is smothered with mustard, baby powder and laundry detergent to fool drug-sniffing dogs.

Crystals are increasingly dissolved in water, especially during the last year, making the drug more difficult to detect in giant X-ray scanners that inspectors order some motorists to drive through. The water is later boiled and often mixed with acetone, a combustible fluid used in paints that yields clear shards of methamphetamine favored by users. The drug often remains in liquid form until reaching its final distribution hub.

The government has expanded X-ray inspections of cars at the border in recent years, but increased production in Mexico and the Sinaloa cartel’s presence are driving the seizures, Garcia said. “This is a new corridor for them,” he said.

The U.S. government shut large methamphetamine labs during the last decade as it introduced sharp limits on chemicals used to make the drug, causing production to shift to Mexico.

The U.S. State Department said in March that the Mexican government seized 958 labs under former President Felipe Calderon from 2006 to 2012, compared with 145 under the previous administration. Mexico seized 267 labs last year, up from 227 in 2011.

As production moved to central Mexico, the Sinaloa cartel found opportunity in Tijuana in 2008 when it backed a breakaway faction of the Arellano Felix clan, named for a family that controlled the border smuggling route for two decades. Sinaloa, led by Joaquin “Chapo” Guzman, had long dominated nearby in eastern California and Arizona.

Tijuana registered 844 murders in 2008 in a turf war that horrified residents with castrated bodies hanging from bridges. After the Sinaloa cartel prevailed, the Mexican border city of more than 2 million people returned to relative calm, with 332 murders last year and almost no public displays of brutality.

Alfonzo “Achilles” Arzate and his younger brother Rene, known as “The Frog,” have emerged as top Sinaloa operatives in Tijuana — the former known as the brains and the latter as the brawn. The elder Arzate has been mentioned on wire intercepts for drug deals as far as Chicago, Hill said.

He appears to have gained favor with the Sinaloa cartel brass after another cartel operative raided one of his warehouses in October 2010, leading to a shootout and the government seizing 134 tons of marijuana.

Methamphetamine has also turned into a scourge throughout Tijuana, becoming the most common drug offense for dealers and consumers in the last five years, said Miguel Angel Guerrero, coordinator of the Baja California state attorney general’s organized crime unit.

“It has increased a lot in the city because it’s cheaper than cocaine, even cheaper than marijuana,” he said.

Disputes among street dealers lead to spurts of violence in Tijuana, said Guerrero, including April’s murder tally of 56 bodies. But the killings pale in numbers and brutality compared to the dark days of 2008 and 2009. While president, Calderon hailed Tijuana as a success story in his war on cartels.

“The Sinaloa cartel, their presence here has been strong enough to the point that no one is pushing back,” said the DEA’s Hill. “They just simply want to focus on making money and moving the dope across.”

 

 

 

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/as-cartel-extends-reach-methamphetamine-floods-california-border-crossing/2013/06/28/0285b06a-dfcb-11e2-8cf3-35c1113cfcc5_story.html