MCPHERSON, Kansas — The McPherson County Sheriff’s Department says a traffic stop led to the seizure of about 7 pounds of methamphetamine.

Sheriff Larry Powell says in a news release that the drugs were found after a vehicle was stopped Monday on Interstate 135 near Moundridge.

Deputies found drug paraphernalia in the pickup and impounded the vehicle. The methamphetamine was then found in the truck.

Powell estimated the value of the drugs at $1.75 million.

One person was arrested for possession of methamphetamine with intent to distribute.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.dailyjournal.net/view/story/c51336aee2f043b581117246308a828f/KS–Large-Meth-Bust/

 

SAN DIEGO – A young man whose body was discovered in Mission Beach last month died of drowning due to methamphetamine intoxication, a medical examiner determined.Scott_Bowles_new_pic_1415678812636_9547899_ver1_0_640_480

Scott Bowles, 37, had been missing for a week when a kayaker came across his body.

Bowles had moved to San Diego from Arkansas at the beginning of 2014 and was living in Ocean Beach at the time of his death. He often visited his daughter, who lives in Julian.

His father, John Bowles, told the medical examiner that his son had begun having problems with recreational drugs, including bath salts, three years ago.

Scott Bowles was a Navy veteran who had worked on submarines. He was preparing to begin a new career as a heavy equipment operator for a company in Lakeside.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.10news.com/news/vet-died-of-drowning-due-to-meth-intoxication-11102014_

 

 

FAYETTEVILLE — Three men and one woman were arrested Monday in the Magnuson Grand Hotel in connection with possession of methamphetamine with the purpose to deliver and several other drug and weapon charges.55290495_FN-METH-BUST-PARSONS-12-31_t300

Lisa Selvey of Centerton and John Hensley, Tommy Maples and Don Parsons, all of Fayetteville, were arrested about 5 p.m. Monday in connection with possession of meth and other controlled substances and drug paraphernalia. Hensley also was arrested in connection with possession of a defaced firearm, simultaneous possession of firearms and drugs, and theft by receiving.

All were being held Tuesday in the Washington County Detention Center.

Hensley was the original target of a 4th Judicial District Drug Task Force search warrant, according to preliminary arrest reports. Fayetteville officers suspected he was selling meth from a hotel room. When the officers arrived, they found at least four weapons, meth, several pills, marijuana and other items, according to the reports. Hensley was being held in lieu of $3,500 bond.

Officers found the three others in the room next door with a similar stash, according to the reports. Parsons is the youngest at 19, Hensley and Selvey are 23 and Maples is 28.

The meth was a large-crystal variety called “ice,” which suggests it was imported from Mexico or elsewhere instead of being made locally, Sgt. Craig Stout said. Investigators have seen increasing amounts of the imported variety in recent years as local production has fallen.

Drug task force members wouldn’t say if they were looking for others related to Monday’s arrests, but more arrests are always a possibility, Stout said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.nwaonline.com/news/2014/dec/31/four-arrested-after-fayetteville-hotel-/

 

City doctors have warned that consumption of drugs is going to rise steeply on New Year’s Eve. And they have appealed to youngsters to stay off any white powder.

Psychiatrists say the use of methamphetamine (Crystal Meth) and mephedrone (M-Cat) is bound to be rampant in New Year parties. “M-Cat and Crystal Meth have taken over weed and cocaine in the past six months. Their consumption has reached epidemic proportions in Mumbai. M-Cat is a chemical to be wary of as it is freely available and effectively marketed,” said Dr Harish Shetty, city-based senior psychiatrist.

Shetty sees close to 100 patients every month suffering from drug addiction and substance abuse. “Of these, 20% alone are on M-Cat. The patients range between as young as 14-years-old to 40-somethings,” he said.

“M-Cat, which gives an instant rush, makes a person impulsive, aggressive and hyperactive. The risk of driving rashly or meeting with an accident is worse under the influence of this drug than under the influence of alcohol.”

The first addicts of heroin were noticed near the Gateway of India in 1978. Post the inlays of heroin in Mumbai, it took close to a decade for the number of users to reach an estimated 1 lakh.

Dr Yusuf Merchant, president, Drug Abuse Information Rehabilitation and Research Centre, said, “Within a year alone, users of M-Cat have reached to nearly 30,000. It is being brought from China in kilos, hoarded and sold in black market.”

While for every 100 men, one woman consumes heroin, and for every 20 men, one woman uses cocaine, more women are getting high on M-Cat than ever. “For every three men I see using M-Cat, one woman uses the drug. At this rate, the risk of transmitting STDs like HIV/AIDS is high,” warned Merchant.

Shetty said, “What is even more appalling is that there is no concentrated effort by the police to track from where the drugs are being bought. While peddlers are being temporarily arrested, there are no large hauls or busting operations of clandestine labs.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.dnaindia.com/mumbai/report-crystal-meth-m-cat-have-replaced-weed-and-cocaine-warn-shrinks-2048266

 

 

MUMBAI: The reason Mumbai’s youth consume the deadly meth or M-cat is simple: in the short-term, these drug release high levels of neurotransmitter dopamine. A hormone, dopamine is associated with pleasure that one draws from happy activities such as eating one’s favorite dish, watching a favorite movie or being in the company of a loved one and so on.

The reason doctors are worried about meth and other such “middle-class cocaine alternatives” is also obvious: these lab-drugs are highly addictive and cause a host of physical and mental problems. ‘Meth mouth’, characterized by tooth decay and fall, is one of the obvious side-effects. Psychosis, along with hallucinations, is another big worry. Newer research in the US where meth was banned long back show structural changes in the brain areas associated with emotions and cognition.

 “Around 80% of addicts admitted for rehabilitation in state government-run GT Hospital near CST as well as Masina Hospital in Byculla are meth addicts,” said psychiatrist Dr Yusuf Matcheswalla. He said many of the addicts become prone to lung infections because of rampant meth and M-cat usage. The show of aggression, the frequency of nose bleeds and the odd convulsions is the price that many of these addicts pay, said Dr Matcheswalla.

“In the early eighties, we saw brown sugar addiction. Now, it is addiction to the amphetamine family of compounds such as crystal meth or M-cat,” said psychiatrist Dr Harish Shetty. “It was previously believed that an idle mind is a devil’s workshop, but nowadays an empty house is a devil’s workshop. Youngsters look for such empty houses because they get access to drugs, games and porn,” he added.

Doctors say these lab-grown compounds are cheap to make: literally cooked in a pressure cooker and dried in the open. “Having a mephedrone fix costs Rs 15 which is equivalent to buying vada pav,” said Dr Yusuf Merchant who runs the NGO Drug Abuse Information Rehabilitation and Research Centre (DAIRRC).

At a press conference held on Tuesday, he said M-cat had become popular because “it is legal in India, it doesn’t have to be smoked but can be sniffed or eaten. It is a sexual stimulant. It is cheap costing Rs 150 for one gram.” Dr Merchant estimates that 30,000 teenagers in Mumbai alone are addicted to mephedrone. Dr Shetty saw six youngsters on Monday who want to break the habit. “Today, I saw three more with a similar request,” he said.

DAIRRC has petitioned the government to add drugs such as M-Cat and meth to the Narcotics Drugs and Psychotropic Substances Act (NDPS Act). Last week, chief minister Devendra Fadnavis said the state would appeal to the Centre to add such drugs to the Act. At present, the Mumbai police book those found with this substances under section 328 of the IPC that forbids the consumption, possession or transportation of a poisonous substance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mumbai/Growing-meth-addiction-in-city-has-doctors-concerned/articleshow/45696423.cms

 

A federal meth investigation first reported earlier this month has resulted in the indictment of 12 area people, all of whom could be sent to prison for life.

The yearlong investigation resulted in several Thanksgiving Day arrests and the recovery of what officials say was possibly more than 10 pounds of meth and more than $150,000.

The 12 are charged with a variety of three different drug crimes, but all face the most serious charge of conspiracy to distribute more than 500 grams of methamphetamine, which carries a maximum sentence of life in prison, and a minimum sentence of 10 years.

The defendants include Kenneth R. Friend, 44; Kenna M. Harmon, 36; Eric M. McClanahan, 35; Nelson “Diego” Olmeda; 24; Anthony J. Van Pelt, 36; Anthony M. Massoni, 41; Anthony A. Hatfield; 31; Cheryl D. Paluczak, 47; Melody W. Carpenter, 32; Bonnie L. Amodio, 29; Donette C. Davis, 41; and Joseph R. Allen, 40.

Don Ledford, with the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the Western District of Missouri, said he could not speak specifically about the case due to legal and ethical restrictions, but said an indictment with 12 defendants is a significant, though not unusual, size of case for the office.

He said federal drug cases tend to have many defendants because they don’t investigate “street-level drug dealers,” but rather drug organizations.

The complaint, filed before a grand jury indicted the suspects, said agents used wiretaps to intercept phone calls and text messages discussing drug transactions.

According to the complaint, the first interaction with a suspect came on Nov. 3, when officers arrested Carpenter with 4 ounces of meth, paraphernalia and a loaded automatic pistol. Soon after, on Nov. 6, agents intercepted a planned transaction between Friend and McClanahan. Highway Patrol officers stopped McClanahan’s truck, searched it and found 2 pounds of meth, documents say.

The bulk of the arrests, however, occurred on Nov. 27, when officers arrested Friend and Harmon as the two were allegedly planning to meet each other for a sale.

The indictment includes fewer details, but does outline amounts of money and vehicles recovered which investigators believe were either obtained via drug sales or used to facilitate sales.

Between six forfeiture allegations in the indictment, officials are trying to obtain approximately $170,000, nine vehicles and a property in Halfway. If the defendants are ordered to forfeit that property, a percentage would go to the agencies involved in the investigation, for use in purchasing equipment or vehicles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.news-leader.com/story/news/local/ozarks/2014/12/29/ozarks-indicted-alleged-meth-ring-face-life-prison/21010331/

 

LAWTON, Okla._Lawton police arrested two people Saturday morning after they were tipped off about a meth delivery.

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Detectives were told about a delivery containing eight ounces of methamphetamine, who had it and where it was going. The detectives arrived at the suspected location on Northwest 62nd Street and saw a silver Nissan van in the driveway. The driver, Julian Tello-Gonzalez, and his wife, Guadalupe Lopez, were removed from the vehicle and a K9 unit was called in.

Kano, the K9 unit, gave a positive alert on the vehicle. Officers found a large bag hidden under a panel near the shifter. The bag contained approximately 232 grams (8.18 ounces) of suspected methamphetamine. The bag’s contents were field tested and gave a positive result for being methamphetamine.

Tello-Gonzalez and Lopez were arrested on a complaint of trafficking methamphetamine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.kswo.com/story/27724891/couple-caught-with-half-pound-of-meth

 

CALIPATRIA – A 54-year-old woman visiting Calipatria State Prison was arrested on suspicion of trying to smuggle methamphetamine, heroin and marijuana into the prison on Friday.54a1a99082a43_image

Cynthia Elrod of Big Bear was schedule for a two-day family visit with her son, inmate Mike Canales who was convicted of second-degree murder, when staff noticed the strong smell of marijuana coming from her, said Lt. Everardo Silva, prison public information office/administrative assistant.

Elrod appeared nervous and evasive when questioned by staff and later informed staff that she did have contraband on her.

Elrod relinquished one bindle during a search, and that bindle contained four smaller ones.

Two bindles contained a total of 22 grams of methamphetamine with an estimated prison value of $22,000. One bindle contained 21.5 grams of heroin with an estimated prison value of $15,750 and the last bindle contained a little more than six grams of marijuana with an estimated prison value of $1,525.

If successfully smuggled in, the drugs would have had a total estimated prison value of more than $39,000.

Evidence collected linked Canales to the crime, and he was placed in the prison’s administrative segregation unit which is a jail within the prison.

Elrod was booked into Imperial County jail and if convicted, faces three to five years in prison.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.ivpressonline.com/quicknews/prison-visitor-arrested-accused-of-trying-to-smuggle-drugs-into/article_4be1ab2c-8f8f-11e4-a0cc-27e1ab723af7.html

 

 

CAMERON COUNTY – Federal authorities are pressing charges against two Guatemalan men who were caught smuggling liquid methamphetamine.

Federal agents found about 100 gallons of liquid methamphetamine inside a semi-truck’s fuel tank.

The load was discovered at the Los Indios Point of Entry in Cameron County. Federal agents have strong evidence to show that Guatemalan natives Juan Garcia and Hector Monzon tried to move the contraband into the U.S.

The incident happened the day after Christmas. Garcia was driving a 1998 Freightliner tractor trailer over the border.

A K-9 unit alerted customs officials to the presence of narcotics in the truck’s fuel tank. Upon further inspection, they determined the tanks contained 100 gallons of meth.

The following day, Monzon approached Border Patrol agents to inquire about the truck Garcia was driving. Monzon later admitted he was the registered owner of the truck and paid Garcia $100 to drive the truck.

Methamphetamine is a highly addictive drug that comes in many forms – powder, crystal and liquid.

This drug has become increasingly popular to smuggle through the Rio Grande Valley borders because it is easily produced and sold for a high profit.

Garcia and Monzon face federal drug charges. A court date has not been set.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.krgv.com/news/local-news/Men-Caught-Smuggling-Liquid-Meth/30451562

 

Nearly 21 pounds of Methamphetamine was seized Sunday at the Dennis DeConcini crossing in Nogales, and a woman was arrested by federal officials.54a218219c7b4_image

Rachel Christine Chadwell, 28, a U.S. citizen, was taken into custody by U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers after a drug-sniffing dog alerted to drugs within the rear seats of her 2003 Pontiac sedan, according to a news release.

The vehicle and drugs were seized, and Chadwell was processed for prosecution, officials said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://tucson.com/news/blogs/police-beat/meth-worth-seized-at-border-crossing/article_0355e316-8fce-11e4-89b5-9bb58e5dd81a.html

 

The case against a Casper woman accused of burning a baby’s face with a hot pan in September will go to trial, according to a Natrona County District Court judge.541b68e3e1bea_image

Stephanie Shirts, 25, is charged with four counts of child abuse, four counts of child endangerment with methamphetamine and one count of aggravated child abuse. District Court Judge Catherine Wilking scheduled Shirts’ trial for Feb. 2.

Shirts allegedly rolled a hot saucepan on an infant’s face and shook the baby with enough force to require trauma care. She faces 65 years in prison if convicted on all nine counts prosecutors have charged her with. She pleaded not guilty in October.

Authorities also accuse Shirts of suffocating the 14-month-old girl with a blanket, according to an officer’s report. The infant was taken by Lifeflight in September to the children’s hospital in Aurora, Colorado, with a brain bleed and bleeding in the eyes.

She posted $100,000 bond earlier this year. However, Wilking revoked Shirt’s bond in October after the woman was arrested for shoplifting. Wilking reinstated bond at $250,000, and Shirts remains in custody.

Bobbi Humphreys, the infant’s mother, is charged with child endangerment with methamphetamine and one count of misdemeanor child endangering.

A man who lives with Shirts and Humphreys, Jason Cathcart, 37, is charged with four counts of child endangerment with methamphetamine and one count each of felony and misdemeanor possession of a controlled substance.

Three other children, all under the age of 5, resided with Shirts, Humphreys and Cathcart at the time of their initial arrests. Police say the children did not have any injuries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://trib.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/case-against-casper-woman-accused-of-burning-infant-s-face/article_a662b2e4-3c0b-5107-bf7a-be8c0ea81daa.html

 

UPDATE February 29, 2016

A Casper woman is heading to prison after admitting that she caused physical harm to children.

Stephanie Shirts was sentenced to 18-20 years at the Wyoming Women’s Center in Lusk, after she pleaded guilty to two counts of child abuse, one count of aggravated child abuse and two counts of child endangerment meth.stephanie-shirts

The case started in middle September 2014, when Casper police were called to the Wyoming Medical Center about a one-year-old girl with severe head trauma.

The child had significant head injuries and was on a ventilator.

An officer also observed burns to the face and head, as well as multiple injuries in various stages of healing over her body

Officers went to a house on the 1700 block of South Fairdale Avenue, where Shirts, along with Bobbi Humphreys and Jason Cachcart lived.

They checked on other children in the house, who did not appear to have any injuries, and they were taken into protective custody.

Shirts was accused by prosecutors of burning the child’s face with a hot sauce pan, as well as shaking the child violently and smothering her, to get her to stop crying.

During search warrants executed on the residence, officers – with the help of a k9 dog – found and collected drug paraphernalia evidence.

Shirts’ actual sentence was 18-20 years for aggravated child abuse, and three to five years for each of the other four charges.

Those sentences will run concurrent with one another, or at the same time.

Meanwhile, Humphreys and Cathcart have each pleaded guilty to charges connected to this case, and have been sentenced.

 

http://k2radio.com/stephanie-shirts-sentenced-for-child-abuse/

 

 

Four years.

Sixteen agencies.

57 people convicted.

And 304 years in jail.

Washington County Sheriff Ed Graybeal announced Monday that officers and agents from local, state and federal agencies have finished a four-year methamphetamine conspiracy investigation that led to 57 people being convicted and sentenced in federal court.

He announced the final convictions and sentencings in a press release Monday.

The 57 defendants will spend a collective 304 years in federal prison for their convictions, according to WCSO Lt. Doug Gregg. He said the investigation began in 2010 on Bill Jones Road in Washington County, but continued to include areas of Sulphur Springs, Telford, Limestone, Jonesborough, Johnson City, Elizabethton, Erwin and Unicoi County as well as areas in North Carolina. Gregg said the inter-agency cooperation is necessary in these types of investigations because of the number of people involved in the operation who cross county and state lines to buy meth lab precursors used to make the highly addictive drug.

Gregg said 2014 was a better year for Washington County in terms of the number of suspected meth labs discovered and dismantled.

“We had a total of seven, which includes one in Jonesborough,” Gregg said. “That’s down from last year’s (2013) total of 27 worked by Washington County Sheriff’s Office alone.”

The number of labs in Washington County in 2014, to date, was 32 down from a countywide total of 43 in 2013. Other agencies within the county worked the remaining lab scenes.

Gregg said that of those 32 suspected meth labs this year, 11 were discovered by the WCSO through proactive investigations, rather than just merely responding to reports of meth labs found.

As investigations spread and grow, investigators interview defendants and gather more leads that end up helping eliminate more labs, Gregg said. He said it isn’t unusual to find that one meth cook has passed on the method to 10 other people.

That’s what allows the meth problem to spread so quickly, he said.

The final person charged in the investigation was sentenced earlier this month.

Those arrested, their original charges, and final sentences:

Anthony W. Maupin, 39, 458 Cash Hollow Road, Johnson City; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, two county of distribution of a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 60 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Cory T. Maupin, 26, 201 Rich Hollow Road, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Distribution of a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of methamphetamine X2, Possession of equipment, chemicals, products, and materials which may be used to manufacture methamphetamine. Sentenced to 84 months in federal prison and 36 months on supervised release.

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Gary G. Richardson, 37, 660 Cherokee Mountain Road, Jonesborough; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Distribution of a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 70 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Felicia A. Hopson, 28, 210 Parsley St. #12, Unicoi; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 60 months on supervised release.

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Randall L. Sliger, 43, Headtown Road, Jonesborough; Initial Charges: Distribution of 50 grams or more of a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 60 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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David Jay Yates, 50, 112 Robert Smith Road, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Possession of equipment, chemicals, products, and materials which may be used to manufacture methamphetamine. Sentenced to 115 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Brandon R. Fender, 31, 130 McInturff Cemetary Road, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 18 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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David H. Vestal, 36, 212 Creek Road, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 100 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Robert L. Gillis, 41, 104 Cooper Lane, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 70 months in federal prison and 60 months on supervised release.

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Jason R. Duncan, 36, 787 Bayless Road, Jonesborough; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 78 months in federal prison and 60 months on supervised release.

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Mark A. Gardner, 38, 137 Spring Brook Road, Unicoi; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 41 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Savannah J. Williams, 21, 408 N. Mohawk Drive, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 6 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Christy N. Clouse, 31, General Delivery, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 33 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Nathaniel J. Effler, 25, 313 Lee Avenue, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Possession of equipment, chemicals, products, and materials which may be used to manufacture methamphetamine. Sentenced to 60 months in federal prison and 60 months on supervised release.

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Timothy F. Dunbar, 44, 900 Bumpass Cove Road, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 84 months in federal prison and 60 months on supervised release.

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Sandy M. Hodges, 45, 665 Princeton Road, Johnson City; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 54 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Kenneth D. McCravey, 41, 533 Washington St., Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 36 months in federal prison and 36 months on supervised release.

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Jeffery H. Higgins, 44, 948 Spivey Mountain Road, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Distribution of a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of methamphetamine, Possession of equipment, chemicals, products, and materials which may be used to manufacture methamphetamine. Sentenced to 52 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Brenda R. English, 41, 112 Robert Smith Road, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 27 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Douglas G. Gaskin, 54, 1435 Love Station Road, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Possession of equipment, chemicals, products, and materials which may be used to manufacture methamphetamine. Sentenced to 54 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Misty D. Potter, 37, 296 Blaine White Road, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Possession of equipment, chemicals, products, and materials which may be used to manufacture methamphetamine. Sentenced to 66 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Timothy W. Smith, 30, 940 N. Elm Ave., Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Possession of equipment, chemicals, products, and materials which may be used to manufacture methamphetamine. Sentenced to 92 months in federal prison and 60 months on supervised release.

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Crystal D. Williams, 41, 408 Mohawk Drive, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 90 months in federal prison and 60 months on supervised release.

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Angelia M. Robinson, 42, 24 Taylor Ridge Court, Johnson City; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 48 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Rachel M. Edwards, 27, General Delivery, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 51 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Christy R. McVay, 33, 514 Rock Creek Road, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 46 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Jason D. Vestal, age 25, 616 Monroe St., Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 84 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Joshua R. Whitson, age 32, 107 Parsley St., Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 96 months in federal prison and 60 months on supervised release.

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Carl “Daniel” Ray, age 35, 110 Jean Davis Lane, Unicoi; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 60 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Daniel R. Hopson, age 32, 210 Parsley Street #12, Unicoi; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 41 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Joseph B. Banner, age 36, 160 Masters St., Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Conspiracy to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Distribution of a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of methamphetamine X2. Sentenced to 170 months in federal prison and 96 months on supervised release.

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Jerry W. “Merd” Howell, age 47, 120 Deadrick St., Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 60 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Brandon Beals, age 29, 800 Broyles St. #B4, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Possession of equipment, chemicals, products, and materials that would be used to manufacture a controlled substance. Sentenced to 120 months in federal prison and 36 months on supervised release.

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Ray Charles “Charlie” English, age 22, 499 Hickory Hollow Road, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 60 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Samuel “Mack” Sanders III, age 37, 221 ½ Dry Creek Road, Jonesborough; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Possession of equipment, chemicals, products, and materials that would be used to manufacture a controlled substance, Possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking offense. Sentenced to 84 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Daniel “Scott” Smith, age 40, 112 Robert Smith Road, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Possession of equipment, chemicals, products, and materials that would be used to manufacture a controlled substance. Sentenced to 10 months in federal prison and 36 months on supervised release.

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Clinton C. Cooper, age 28, 1830 N. Main St., Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 60 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Spencer J. Yates, age 37, 578 Old Embreeville Road, Jonesborough; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 33 months in federal prison and 36 months on supervised release.

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Brian S. Smith, age 41, 121 Scott Road, Johnson City; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 46 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Michael T. Smith, age 39, 154 Creek Road, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Conspiracy to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Possession of equipment, chemicals, products, and materials that would be used to manufacture a controlled substance, Distribution of a mixture or substance containing a detectable amount of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 41 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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Donnie L. Hensley, age 41, 944 N. Main St., Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 37 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

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David E. Gardner, age 53, 1159 Mountainview Road, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 70 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

DavidEGardner_s

Robert C. Bennett, age 36, 353 Spice Hollow Road, Johnson City; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Possession of equipment, chemicals, products, and materials that would be used to manufacture a controlled substance. Sentenced to 70 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

RobertCBennett_s

George R. Thomas, age 31, 419 Walnut St., Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Possession of equipment, chemicals, products, and materials that would be used to manufacture a controlled substance. Sentenced to 46 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

GeorgeRThomas_s

Timothy S. Franklin, age 37, 454 Hickory Hollow Road, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 51 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

TimothySFranklin_s

Stacy G. Black, age 44, 420 Walnut St., Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Possession of equipment, chemicals, products, and materials that would be used to manufacture a controlled substance X2. Sentenced to 70 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

StacyBlack_s

Jarrod A. Hicks, age 33, 135 Virgie Hicks Road, Unicoi; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Conspiracy to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Possession of equipment, chemicals, products, and materials that would be used to manufacture a controlled substance. Sentenced to 51 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

JarrodHicks_s

Autumn M. McKinney, age 28, 206 Gay St., Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 42 months in federal prison and 46 months on supervised release.

AutumnMcKinney_s

Jeffrey R. Casey, age 36, 136 M Coffey Lane, Jonesborough; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Conspiracy to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Distribution of a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of methamphetamine, Possession of equipment, chemicals, products, and materials that would be used to manufacture a controlled substance X2. Sentenced to 70 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

JeffRCasey_s

Lisa C. Effler, age 44, 620 Mill Creek Road, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 37 months in federal prison and 36 months on supervised release.

LisaCEffler_s

Jason A. Briggs, age 35, 4575 Old Asheville Highway, Flag Pond; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 37 months in federal prison and 36 months on supervised release.

JasonBriggs_s

Darren L “Pooh” Hensley, age 29, 208 Williams Street, Erwin; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 75 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

DarrenLHensley_s

Richie J. Barnett, age 49, 911 Massachusetts Ave., Unicoi; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Manufacture of a quantity of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 135 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

RichieJBarnett_s

Ruth N. Barnett, age 45, 911 Massachusetts Ave., Unicoi; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Manufacture of a quantity of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 120 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

RuthNokaBarnett_s

Kyle A. White, 35, 1201 E. 8th Ave. #4, Johnson City; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Possession of equipment, chemicals, products, and materials that would be used to manufacture a controlled substance, Manufacture of a quantity of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 114 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

KyleAWhite_s

Dena V. Dugger, 30, 105 Hamilton St., Johnson City; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, Maintaining a place for the purpose of manufacturing, distributing, and using methamphetamine. Sentenced to 60 months in federal prison and 48 months on supervised release.

DenaVDugger_s

Tara N. Hill, 32, 169 Lovers Lane, Elizabethton; Initial Charges: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Sentenced to 46 months in federal prison and 36 months on supervised release.

TaraNHill_s

In addition to the WCSO, agencies that participated in the investigation were: Erwin Police Department, Unicoi County Sheriff’s Office, 1st Judicial Drug Task Force, Carter County Sheriff’s Office, Elizabethton Police Department, Green County Sheriff’s Office, Johnson City Police Department, Kingsport Police Department, Sullivan County Sheriff’s Office, Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Methamphetamine Task Force, Watauga County Sheriff’s Office in North Carolina, and the Drug Enforcement Administration.

Anyone having any knowledge of a methamphetamine lab is asked to contact their local law enforcement agency. If any item is found that is believed to be a one-pot meth lab or a chemical used in the manufacture of methamphetamine you are asked not to touch it, as a slight disturbance is sometimes all that is needed to cause a chemical reaction that could result in death or serious bodily injury.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.johnsoncitypress.com/article/123174/multi-cell-meth-ring-bust-brings-304-years-in-prison-for-67-people-in-multiple-northeast-tennessee-counties

 

LEONI TWP., MI – A 46-year-old man went to the hospital Sunday, Dec. 28, with burns suffered in what police said was methamphetamine-related spill or small explosion on Larch Drive.

The man had been allegedly cooking meth in the basement of his father’s house, burned his hands and sought his own medical treatment, Blackman-Leoni Township public safety Deputy Director Jon Johnston said. He went to Allegiance Health. From there, he was transferred to the University of Michigan Medical Center in Ann Arbor.

Johnston did not have an update on the man’s condition, but said his injuries were not believed to be life-threatening.

A couple hours later, the man’s father arrived home, found remnants of meth production and called police shortly before 9 p.m.

Blackman-Leoni authorities contacted the Jackson Narcotics Enforcement Team, which handles meth lab clean-ups.

Officers found items used to make meth in the basement, said Michigan State Police Detective Lt. Dave Cook, commander of the team. He said officers spotted lithium batteries, sulfuric acid, Coleman fuel, lye and other evidence of meth creation. Burn marks and some charred remains made it clear there had been a fire.

The man’s 76-year-old father and another person were at the home, but they were not thought to be involved and were not arrested, Cook said.

Police likely will later ask the prosecutor’s office to charge the injured man, Cook and Johnston said.

The investigation, in its early stages, is continuing, Johnston said.

Members of the narcotics team cleaned up the components, which are taken to a secure container until they are hauled away for safe disposal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.mlive.com/news/jackson/index.ssf/2014/12/man_burned_while_allegedly_coo.html

 

Springfield police recovered meth, marijuana and a pair of guns from the home of a known Southwest Honkey gang member earlier this month, according to court documents.

Officials have previously said the gang is responsible for dealing meth across the state.

A search warrant says that police seized the drugs and guns from a home at 1441 W. Calhoun St. in Springfield on Dec. 11 after they received a tip from a confidential source that drugs were being sold out of the house.

One of the residents of the house, Calvin Jones, is a self-admitted member of the Southwest Honkey gang — a group known to sell meth in southwest Missouri — according to the search warrant.

The other residents of the house are Stephen Arata, Krystal Jones and Timothy Murray, the search warrant says. While all four residents have criminal records, none has been charged in relation to this investigation.

The search warrant says police conducted surveillance on the home after receiving the tip. An officer observed numerous people coming and going from the residence, which is a possible sign of illegal drug sales, and the residence was equipped with a motion light and a surveillance camera, the search warrant says.

Police followed a pickup truck after it stopped at the residence and one of its occupants went inside the house for less than two minutes before driving away, the search warrant says.

An officer stopped the truck for having a defective license plate lamp and then received consent to search the vehicle. During the search of the vehicle and its occupants, police recovered syringes and a baggie of meth, according to the search warrant.

Police served a “no knock” warrant two days after the traffic stop and recovered a .22-caliber rifle, a semi-automatic handgun, ammunition, pills, marijuana, meth, baggies, a scale and numerous pipes, according to the search warrant.

Springfield police recovered guns and meth from the home of three other Southwest Honkey gang members in February, and another member of the gang was arrested for leading police on a car chase with two children in his car in August, according to court documents.

Authorities said in March that Joplin police, in particular, have been following the Southwest Honkey gang.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.news-leader.com/story/news/crime/2014/12/28/court-documents-meth-guns-found-home-southwest-honkey-gang-member/20985847/

 

FOR five years, Mark Curtis was earning $600 a day drilling on the mines and coming home to a binge-fest of drugs and booze.

Methamphetamines were among his drugs of choice, having first tried “ice” in 1994.

“It fools you into thinking you’re having a good time, life is great and everything’s fantastic,” Mr Curtis said.

“It helps you connect with other people doing the same thing and you’re excited, you can stay awake for days.”

He would sleep through the comedown for a couple of days to get clean before his next swing — going back to the mine site broke.

His partying then spiraled into addiction after a workplace car crash in 2007. His injuries made him unable to work and in 2010 he received $540,000 in worker’s compensation. His addiction became so bad he had the drugs delivered to his door.

By the start of 2012, he had blown it all.

“I was living on the streets. I blew the whole lot, and I lost my partner, my dog, all of my belongings,” Mr Curtis said.

During a drug-induced psychosis police surrounded his house after he locked himself inside threatening he had a bomb.

“The TRG were running around the house. They had red dots on me through the window. It was unbelievable, and then I assaulted one of them when I got arrested,” he said.

Mr Curtis decided to turn his life around after becoming suicidal in jail. He eventually found a sense of belonging in the prison Christian fellowship and was accepted into the Salvation Army’s rehabilitation program in June 2012.

He finished the program in January last year.

“For a few months (when I started the program) I was in denial, thinking I could still dabble, but you can’t,” Mr Curtis said.

The 45-year-old has been sober for two-and-a-half years and is now volunteering at the Salvation Army’s Harry Hunter rehabilitation centre and men’s homeless shelter.

“I think it’s a blessing that I lost all of that money,” he said.

“If I hadn’t blown it, I would have continued doing the same thing.”

NEW POLICE SQUAD FOR WAR ON ICE

A PERMANENT new police squad has been formed to smash clandestine drug laboratories in WA.

PerthNow can reveal the new team started work this week tasked with halting the “dramatically increasing” supply of methamphetamine in metropolitan and regional WA.

The team of seven senior detectives has been ordered to crack down on the manufacture and production of methamphetamine — including highly purified and addictive crystal “ice” — before it reaches dealers and hits the streets.

Serious and organized crime squad boss, Detective-Inspector Chris Adams, confirmed the new unit was operational and said it would scrutinize every person in the state who bought big quantities of laboratory equipment, glassware and chemicals that were commonly used in suburban clandestine labs to “cook” methamphetamine and ice, which fetches up to $360,000 a kilogram.

He said the new team would operate within the existing improvised drug manufacturing investigation (IDMI) unit, a key anti-drug division of the serious and organized crime squad.

It is the latest move in a shake-up of the serious and organized crime squad that also included the formation in October of a specialist “district response team” — also with seven dedicated detectives — to bring down drug-dealing syndicates operating across one or more police districts.

“With these two teams, we’re specifically attacking it from both ends. At the distribution point and at the manufacture point,” Det-Insp Adams said.

New figures released to The Sunday Times show in nine months the district response team carried out 75 search warrants and charged 96 people with 346 offences.

It seized $477,000 in cash, 6700 rounds of ammunition, 20 firearms, 41 other prohibited weapons and drugs including 14kg of MDMA, 5kg of methamphetamine, 178 cannabis plants, 21kg of cannabis, 13kg of synthetic cannabis and 3kg of steroids.

Acting Detective-Senior Sergeant Grant Barber, who heads up the IDMI unit, and Detective-First Class Constable Rebecca Brandham, a new member of the district response team, put drug dealers and manufacturers on notice this week, saying more raids were “imminent”.

Det-Insp Adams said ice induced violent behavior that led to domestic assaults, road trauma and violent crime. It also led to high-volume property crime and burglaries as users tried to pay for their habit.

While drug cooks were being blitzed within WA, Det-Insp Adams conceded amphetamines were also flowing into the state by land, sea and air as syndicates cashed in on “huge demand”.

But he said record seizures were coming because WA Police had forged “very close ties” with Australian Crime Commission, Federal Police and Customs and Border Protection operatives.

“Five years ago we were seizing ounces. Now we’re seizing kilos … multiple kilos,” he said. “Significant quantities of meth are coming into Sydney from Asia, particularly China and Vietnam, and then being couriered into WA.

“It costs between $5000 and $10,000 to produce a kilo of meth in China which sells for $200,000 in Sydney and up to $360,000 in WA.”

The organized crime squad boss said traffickers were also using the postal system in a “shotgun approach to drug smuggling, posting 20 parcels each with 500 grams of meth on the assumption that 18 or 19 will make it through”.

National Drug Research Institute director Professor Steve Allsop said he had seen a “definite spike” in the use of ice.

Carol Daws, who runs Perth drug rehab centre Cyrenian House, said ice destroyed relationships, led to psychosis and paranoia, and was “now one of the most common substances that people are seeking treatment for”.

Researchers say ice has also penetrated the regions. In Busselton, where the fly-in, fly-out population is growing, drug convictions are up 67 per cent this year and in Margaret River convictions have risen by a third.

It comes as the Australian Crime Commission’s Illicit Drug Data Report warned ice had become a national “pandemic”.

The report found methamphetamine was manufactured by organized crime gangs in China, Iran and West Africa and shipped via South-East Asia to the Eastern States hidden in products like tinned fruit, pots, toys and shampoo bottles.

Twenty tons of illegal drugs worth $2.7 billion was seized nationally last year and more than 10,000 people were arrested for drug offences.

THE FAST ROAD TO ADDICTION

For the past 10 years Major Colin Medling had been the manager of The Salvation Army’s Harry Hunter Rehabilitation Centre in Gosnells.

“It’s an insidious drug (methamphetamines) and the real problem is you don’t know how pure it is,” he said.

By the time addicts come to Maj Medling they have been battling the demons for years.

The average age of the male and female clients at ‘Harry’s’ is 36.

They have to complete a three-week assessment and dry-out period at Bridge House in Highgate before they are deemed stable enough to take part in the 15-week program.

“Once they come here, they are all treated the same. Addiction is addiction, is addiction,” Maj Medling said.

About 50 per cent of those who come through Harry’s complete the program.

During their stay, clients are taught about boundaries, anger management, spirituality and responsibility.

Maj Medling said giving the addicts trust and responsibility was one of the reasons why the program has a high success rate.

“When you’re looking at addicts, they’ve never even trusted themselves before,” he said.

THE IMPACT ON HEALTH SERVICES

YOU need five people to hold down a person in the grip a methamphetamine overdose.

But the emergency department at the Royal Perth Hospital gets a lot of practice.

“You need one staff member for each limb, one staff member for the head, one staff member to draw up the drugs, and one to administer them,” emergency department toxicologist Dr Kerry Hoggett said.

The emergency room might see one or two people in that state each day, down a few presentations a week from the peak in 2006.

Dr Hoggett said alcohol still accounts for the majority of emergency presentations, and opiate use is on the rise.

But neither drug makes its users as difficult to treat as methamphetamine does.

“It tends to make you quite agitated and panicked, so often we will see people come in being escorted by police because they have been involved in something else before that,” Dr Hogget said.

“They often appear to be hallucinating. They can be psychotic.”

Opiate use, she said, produces much less “resource intensive” hospital patients.

“They are really sedated and will stay in one spot,” she said.

“Whereas people who are on methamphetamines will take a lot of staff — a lot of security staff, a lot of hospital staff and police — so we can get them sedated so we can treat them.”

Ambulance officers, working in smaller teams, do not have that support.

One long-time St John Ambulance officer, who did not wished to be named, said paramedics were faced with “violent” and “dangerous” methamphetamine addicts on a nightly basis.

Often a person’s “terrified” family or friends will call 000, when they see the erratic behavior typical of a methamphetamine overdose.

 “The violence towards first responders, in particular ambulance officers, is escalating and very dangerous,” the ambulance officer said.

He said the number of methamphetamine overdoses had “dramatically increased” in recent years.

The 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey, released this week said methamphetamine use in Australia was not increasing — but it was switching from powdered forms of the drug to the even more addictive crystal meth or ice.

And the frequency with which people use meth has also increased — 25.3 per cent of crystal meth users took the drug daily last year, compared to 12.4 per cent in 2010.

James Pitts, chief executive of drug rehabilitation centre odyssey House, has seen first-hand the horrors of ice.

He had to retrain staff to handle ice addicts because they are so much more dangerous and difficult to deal with than other drug users.

“With amphetamine-type stimulants, particularly ice, there is a completely different action because it acts on the central nervous system as a stimulant,” he said.

“So the users initially have a heightened sense of wellbeing and confidence. They have an, ‘I can rule the world’ feeling.

“The problem with ice is that kind of wellbeing, that sense of confidence, converts after a period of time into paranoia, agitation and feeling that people are trying to do things to you.

“That’s where the violence aspect comes in. Either a person becomes overly aggressive because of a comment somebody may have made or there is a perception that somebody is trying to harm them in some way and violence ensues.

“The biggest negative with ice is the fact that it doesn’t allow people to sleep and you need sleep so you can maintain some kind of sense of psychiatric balance. Because ice users are up for two or three days or more at a time they have a distortion of reality.

“They have a propensity to hear voices and display delusional behavior. They become agitated, anxiety sets in and they are prone to violence.’’

THE ICE JOURNEY TO WA

  • Organized crime gangs in Iran, West Africa and China have been identified by the Australian Crime Commission as the biggest sources of ice or crystal methamphetamine production on the planet.
  • The ice is then exported in significant quantities to South-East Asian countries including Thailand, Vietnam and Cambodia, usually hidden in sea containers loaded on cargo ships. These countries are targeted for domestic ice consumption and for shipping onto other international markets.
  • Drugs are shipped from South-East Asia to Australia, most commonly in sea containers bound for Sydney and Melbourne. Virtually all the biggest ice seizures in the past year came from sea container busts, with the drugs hidden in items such as tinned fruit, furniture, terracotta pots or shampoo bottles.
  • Biker gangs and other crime groups buy the drugs and take charge of distribution to WA. This is done by road, with ice commonly packed aboard trucks or in cars, again hidden in other items. There is no border control between New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia or WA and police concede it is possible to check only a tiny fraction of freight.
  • Drug barons in WA buy the drugs once they reach the state and smaller quantities are sold to mid-level and low-level drug dealers through a chain of supply that stretches from Perth to Kalgoorlie, Albany, Bunbury, Geraldton, Karratha, Broome and beyond.
  • Biker gangs and drug dealers also make their own ice in “meth labs” in their homes or rental properties.
  • Local drug users purchase the drugs from their dealer and take the drugs in their home, at parties or during a night out on the town.

BREAKING AUSTRALIA’S ICE IMPORTS

The biggest seizures of ice and amphetamine-type stimulants in Australia happened in the Eastern States. Typically ice is landed there before being moved by land to WA. Busts in 2012-13 included:

  • 585kg of crystal meth hidden in sea cargo going from China to Sydney
  • 363.8kg of liquid meth suspended in 96 bottles of carpet cleaning products via sea cargo from China to Melbourne.
  • 306kg of crystal meth concealed in 3,200 terracotta pots via sea cargo from Thailand to Sydney.
  • 200kg of crystal meth hidden in truck tyres and seized in Melbourne.
  • 75kg of crystal meth concealed in sofas and chairs via sea cargo from China to Sydney.
  • 72.9kg of liquid meth concealed and suspended in shampoo and conditioner via sea cargo from China to Sydney.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.perthnow.com.au/news/special-features/inside-the-battle-against-was-meth-addiction/story-fnmx16d1-1226991844416

In an interview with This Day Live, Hamza Umar, the Commander, National Drug Law Enforcement Agency (NDLEA), in charge of the Murtala Muhammed International Airport, Ikeja, Lagos, talks about the improvements in the fight against drug trafficking.

Umar speaks on the numerous breakthroughs, new methods traffickers have devised in transporting their products as well as the rise in the production of meth.Hamza-Umar-0-Dec-2014-BellaNaija_com-01

On arrests made just in 2014: “Yes, what I am going to tell you would shock Nigerians, because it is not a good omen something worth celebrating. If you are fighting a war and you see people committing the same crime and you will begin to ask yourself, what is the problem? What happened? But you will be surprised from January to date at this particular airport; we have impounded more than 400.26 kg of hard drugs. The breakdown shows 97.02 kg of cocaine, 51.01 kg of heroin, 95.77kg of cannabis.

But the highest drug that is very new in part of Africa is methamphetamine. It is a new drug being produced here in Nigeria and in other West African countries. And its price is twice or thrice more than cocaine. So, you can see what is attracting them to it. And they carry this substance mostly to Asia and Pacific and they don’t take it to Europe or America. December has just begun but we have removed out of circulation 400.6kg of hard drugs in this Airport. When I mean by hard drugs, I mean class ‘A’ in United Nations classified hard drugs.”

Speaking on new methods, devised by individuals in trafficking drugs, Hamza Umar said,

“They do a lot of methods. One is concealment, as you know. Two, they do ingestion. Three, they do what we call insertion. This insertion is what they hide in private parts, while some put them in their anus. They also, conceal it in their hair, wigs or fake breasts. You will see a lady and you will say this one is blessed, but there is no blessing in that and instead, it is a concealment method.

Don’t you think your officers and men are compromising by taking bribes in the course of their duties?

Well, if I tell you that, I am not being objective. For me to stand up and tell you that none of the officers and men takes bribes, but we have few cases and they are very negligible. We have an internal procedure for disciplining our officers and men who err. You should be aware recently how an officer was convicted for seven years. I would not and would never, but I want to say that I have 100 percent control over my officers and men. And we have established procedures to deal with such cases.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.bellanaija.com/2014/12/28/breaking-bad-naija-rise-in-meth-production-trafficking-through-fake-female-breasts/

 

Two women have been arrested in connection with the investigation into a rash of mail thefts that plagued Bear Valley Springs prior to Christmas — and the juvenile previously charged with mail theft has been re-arrested on additional charges.Nancy L. Booth

On Dec. 22 Bear Valley Police previously reported the arrest of a juvenile in connection with the thefts. At the time of the arrest, Bear Valley Police recovered evidence linking the juvenile to 42 mail thefts.

In a news release on Sunday afternoon, Dec. 28, Police Chief Rod Walthers said that after the arrest, Bear Valley Police furthered their investigation which led police to submit and receive a search warrant of the juvenile’s residence located in the 26000 block of Ironwood Court in Bear Valley Springs.

On the morning of Dec. 26, Bear Valley Police executed said search warrant and found the juvenile in possession of an illegal loaded firearm along with ammunition, methamphetamine, possession of stolen property, and more mail thefts.Susan B. Little

In addition to the juvenile being arrested, the juvenile’s mother, Nancy Louise Booth, 50, was also arrested for possession of methamphetamine. Booth’s roommate, Susan Brittany Little, 27, who was residing in the house during the investigation, was found to be wanted on felony “Assault with a Deadly Weapon” charges from California City. She also was taken into custody.

After the arrests, Walthers said, the juvenile was booked at Bear Valley PD on the additional charges and then transported to Juvenile Hall located in Bakersfield. Little was booked at Bear Valley PD on the outstanding bench warrant and then transported the Kern County Jail in Bakersfield. Booth was also booked at Bear Valley PD; however due to Prop. 47, she was issued a misdemeanor citation and released.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.tehachapinews.com/news/local/x1494739754/Juvenile-charged-with-mail-theft-in-Bear-Valley-re-arrested-along-with-mother-and-her-roommate

 

WA recorded almost a quarter of the 1000 deaths across Aust­ralia linked to stimulant drug abuse over a five-year period.    242424-d9014dcc-8f04-11e4-8ac7-a81af5c46aa9

The country’s drug epidemic is revealed in figures commissioned by The Sunday Times, showing amphetamines, ecstasy and cocaine are connected to fatalities at an unprecedented rate.

Causes of death included accidents such as road smashes, falls, suicides and crimes of violence. The greatest influences were amphetamine products like ice, listed as a factor in 917 of the deaths.

The figures, compiled by the National Coronial Informat­ion System, show that the drugs were a primary or ­secondary contributor in the deaths of 1049 Australian ­victims.

And despite WA having a far smaller population, its 250 fatalities represented an extraordinarily high 23 per cent of deaths across the country.

That compared with 300 deaths in New South Wales over the same five-year period to 2012, and 207 in Victoria.

National Drug Research ­Institute director Steve Allsop, who is based in WA, said there were not necessarily more stimulant drug users today than previous years, but more potent forms of drugs were available.242450-b2958a04-8f04-11e4-8ac7-a81af5c46aa9

“What is happening is those who use these drugs are using a more potent form,” he said.

Crystal methamphetamine has become much more common . . . of those who use, they are using stuff that is more likely to get them into a mess.

“There has been a doubling of the number of people who end up in treatment in some states.

“People continue to underestimate the dangers of these drugs . . . they cause so much damage and grief for a lot of people.”

The 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey found methamphetamine use was higher in WA – at 3.8 per cent – than in any other ­jurisdiction.

“This is not just a phenomenon that affects the Perth metropolitan area . . . these drugs are also having an impact in many of our remote areas like the Pilbara,” Prof Allsop said.

“A particular challenge for WA, I think, lies with some of our fly-in, fly-out mining community where there has been some evidence recently concerning methamphetamine use.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.perthnow.com.au/news/western-australia/wa-recorded-almost-a-quarter-of-the-1000-deaths-in-australia-linked-to-stimulant-drug-abuse/story-fnhocxo3-1227169246478?nk=0873458911e76e78f2bc19fcc5d47cfc

 

A South San Francisco man who police said lewdly exposed himself to two people in front of a downtown Palo Alto business on Friday afternoon was arrested minutes after the incident.39909_main

Palo Alto police received a call shortly after 1 p.m. on Friday about an indecent exposure that had occurred on the 400 block of Florence Street. Officers responded and located the suspect at Bryant Street and Lytton Avenue. The man, 46-year-old Terrell Jackson, was reportedly arrested without incident.

Police said Jackson had been standing in front of a Downtown North business with his penis showing. One employee of the business, a man in his 40s, reportedly asked Jackson to leave. Jackson allegedly remained on the sidewalk and temporarily obstructed the path of another employee, a woman in her 50s, who was was trying to get into the building.

After the woman stepped past him and walked inside, the man locked the door and told Jackson through the door to go away, police said. Jackson allegedly responded by grabbing his penis and shaking it at the man, who promptly called the police.

Once Palo Alto officers located Jackson, they determined that he had four active probation grants out of San Mateo County for possession of narcotics, and two active probation grants out of Santa Clara County for possessions of narcotics paraphernalia and for being under the influence of narcotics. When officers searched him, pursuant to his probation status, they reportedly found methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia on him.

Jackson was booked in the Santa Clara County Main Jail for felony indecent exposure, a felony probation violation, misdemeanor possession of methamphetamine and misdemeanor possession of narcotics paraphernalia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.paloaltoonline.com/news/2014/12/28/man-arrested-for-indecent-exposure-downtown

 

 

The  newly elected  state government is to be congratulated for  recognizing that 2015 is the year it will need to tackle a  growing threat to the well-being of many Victorian communities – crystal methamphetamine, commonly known as “ice”.

While the extent of Victoria’s ice problem is still being debated  – whether it is  an “epidemic”  or whether it is still largely contained to rural and a handful of outer-suburban communities – there is increasing evidence that its use is becoming more normalized, with increasingly drastic consequences for users, their families and those unfortunates who cross their paths.

In May, a drug agency told The Age ice was affecting “every part of the population” in country Victoria, “from white-collar professionals to amateur football team members”. When the town of Kerang held a community forum on the ice problem, 700 people attended; a similar forum in Cohuna attracted half the town’s population. “It is, without a doubt, the single biggest problem in our community,” a  Mildura police officer told The Age. Another senior officer told us in November that authorities “couldn’t have predicted it would continue to grow the way it has”. An anonymous user told The Age: “It will take a genius to get rid of it. It’s like cane toads. They were introduced and weren’t expected to grow this big.” Magistrates who once might have asked whether alcohol or drugs were catalysts in the cases before them now say: “Is ice involved?”

A pure and potent form of methamphetamine, ice makes users feel energetic and overconfident, lowers inhibitions and increases libido. It is highly addictive and can also make users feel anxious, paranoid and psychotic. It’s a uniquely destructive cocktail. An ice user is likely to make poor decisions, such as driving a car under the influence. Recent data showed a record number of road deaths linked to the drug; similarly, most drivers who tested positive during a recent drug-driving blitz tested positive for ice. Crimes such as family violence and  murder are increasingly being linked to ice.

Recognizing the growing problem, Parliament’s law reform, drugs and crime prevention committee held an inquiry into ice use, spending nearly a year interviewing experts, visiting ice-affected communities, reviewing academic literature and collecting public submissions.

In September it released a comprehensive report, which concluded that ice was “having a significant impact on the social fabric of local communities” and there was evidence it was becoming increasingly “normalized” for some young people. It recognized that stemming the ice scourge would be difficult, complicated and require a sophisticated, multi-pronged approach with an emphasis on harm reduction. It provided 54 detailed recommendations, drawing on successful strategies already implemented in New Zealand.

Premier Daniel Andrews has acknowledged the problem his government has inherited and should be given credit for already acting on his election pledge to form and head an “ice action taskforce” that has a deadline of 100 days to come up with a plan for reducing demand and supply of the drug. The Age has two concerns, however, over Mr Andrews’ approach.

First, his commitments to date suggest a headline-friendly “tough on crime” emphasis over less-dramatic harm-minimization measures. He has introduced four new ice-specific offences and $15 million for new drug and booze buses, but just $500,000 to fund local ice action groups.

Second, we hope the taskforce does not start from scratch but instead immediately moves to implement many or all of the recommendations of the law reform, drugs and crime prevention committee.

Ice was barely known in Victoria seven years ago; clearly our current measures have proved ineffective against it. The time for the wringing of  hands is over: we now need to act.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.theage.com.au/comment/the-age-editorial/we-need-a-year-of-action-on-ice-threat-20141228-12ermv.html

 

Maine drug officials are confronting a startling rise in the number of methamphetamine labs across the state.

Maine Drug Enforcement Agency Director Roy McKinney says it busted 28 meth labs this year, up 12 over last year and more than six times as many as three years ago.DEA

Officials say dismantling labs can cost more than $10,000 each. The raids are taking a toll on the agency’s resources and distracting them from other work. They say it’s difficult to pinpoint why the labs are on the rise.

They hope a $900,000 federal grant will help the state stem the tide. The grant, announced in October, will provide funding for two years for four new drug agents and specialized equipment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.necn.com/news/new-england/Maine-Confronting-Rise-in-Meth-Lab-Busts-286922771.html

 

 

When Robert Steward III was arrested for municipal warrants he left behind a methamphetamine lab in a two-liter Pepsi bottle.

“I observed a two-liter Pepsi bottle with a yellow liquid filling the lower fourth of the bottle and a white powdery substance at the bottom,” Salina Police Chief Justin Hokett stated in his incident report. “I also observed on the floor in plain sight a small clear plastic baggie which had been cut in half. Inside this baggie I saw a few pieces of a white powdery substance which I suspected to be methamphetamine.”

Just outside the bedroom, Hokett found an empty plastic bottle with a tube protruding from the top, labeled for hydrochloric acid.

Law enforcement seized these items and Steward’s phone as evidence. Officers allegedly found a burnt metal spoon containing the same white powdery substance in Steward’s vehicle. This too was seized as evidence.

Hokett, according to the report, then received a search warrant for Steward’s phone.

“From the totality of these text messages it is very evident that Steward has been selling methamphetamine and also purchasing methamphetamine from individuals in and around the City of Salina,” Hokett wrote in his report after recounting numerous text message conversations.

Officers returned to Steward’s residence again and found a cut straw that field tested positive for meth, two lengths of tubing with yellow resin and white powder in a shirt pocket and a pouch of ammonia pellets hidden in a work boot.

Steward was arrested and booked into the Mayes County Jail where Hokett interviewed him. In the interview, Steward allegedly stated there were no meth labs in Salina.

“He stated that the city council was not far from it, that the council is involved on the lowdown,” according to Hokett’s report.

Steward allegedly told Hokett that talking to Hokett was “going to make him dead.”

Steward allegedly said “the bar was at one time a meth ring that was slinging and as of right now they are building it back, and that a city council member was slinging.”

Steward was charged with a felony count of indecent exposure in 2008 but the charges were dismissed. He was charged with first-degree rape in 1996.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.pryordailytimes.com/news/crime_and_courts/salina-pd-arrests-sex-offender-on-meth-charges/article_067e7344-8d5a-11e4-aae8-2f7de4faa33b.html

 

Kidnapped Border Patrol – U.S. federal authorities are investigating a claim that a Border Patrol officer in Texas has been kidnapped by the Mexican drug cartel.kidnapped-border-patrol-mexican-drug-cartel-threatens-to-kill-abducted-border-patrol-agent

Reports indicate that a Mexican man claiming to be a member of the drug cartel called a small Texas town police department on Thursday around 7.p.m.threatening to kill a U.S. Border Patrol Agent he has kidnapped.

According to local reports, the threat, which was made in Spanish, has gotten the attention of federal authorities. The FBI, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials and the La Joya Police Department are working together to authenticate the claim that an agent has been kidnapped.

Authorities say there have been no official reports of a missing Border Patrol agent out of its 3,100 agents working in the Rio Grande Valley in south Texas.

Investigators have reached out to and have so far accounted for more 3,000 agents assigned to the Rio Grande Valley sector. However, only all on-duty officers have been accounted for, investigators are having a difficult time confirming the whereabouts of off-duty agents because of the holiday season.

“Until we rule it out, we treat it as a true kidnapping,” said FBI Special Agent Michelle Lee.

The incident initially started on Thursday morning after the suspect called police in La Joya to report some illegal activities across the border.

“Someone called in and started out reporting some sort of activity, and the call then turned into threats against law enforcement, threats against the dispatcher, and ultimately threats against law enforcement in general,” said Chris Cabrera, a representative with the National Border Patrol Council.”He then claimed to have an agent that was kidnapped that he planned to kill, and he claimed to work for one of the cartels.”

Authorities have not disclosed if the suspected kidnapper gave the name of the Border Patrol agent he has under his custody.

“We are closely monitoring development in the possible abduction of a Border Patrol Agent in the Rio Grande Valley. This incident is a reminder of how dangerous this job is. Every day, our Border Patrol Agents put their lives on the line to protect our nation and our neighborhood from drug cartels, criminals and terrorists,” a statement from the RGV Border Patrol Union read.

There are no records of a Border Patrol Agent being kidnapped by the drug cartels in the recent past. However, there have been many threats and several unsuccessful attempts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.jobsnhire.com/articles/16264/20141227/kidnapped-border-patrol-mexican-drug-cartel-threatens-to-kill-abducted-border-patrol-agent.htm

 

Glenn Lagrew sat in Portland City Hall wearing a freshly pressed light-green shirt, a tie tight on his neck. In the packed council chambers, people embraced, slapping each other on the back and giving long, drawn-out hugs.-40e09e236296af19

The day of celebration — June 26, 2014 — saw 19 men and women graduate from the Service Coordination Team, a city program designed for chronic drug offenders.

Lagrew was among them.

“I aspire to be a better man,” the 49-year-old told the group when presented with his certificate. “I want to make amends to the city and be a role model so my son … will make it out, too.”

Lagrew’s addiction to methamphetamine, his drug of choice and one that fueled a habit hard to kick, led him to 17 years behind bars, mostly on theft and narcotics charges. His frequent visits to Multnomah County Jail landed him in Faces of Meth, the campaign he learned about a decade ago – and discovered he was part of — when an Oregonian reporter called him.

“I knew that my life was going to change drastically at that point,” he said. “That campaign destroyed a lot of people.”

Problems began at a young age. By ninth grade, Lagrew was getting into trouble, rotating through Portland-area high schools. He lived in group homes. He started trying drugs.

“I was uncontrollable,” he said. “My mom couldn’t control me, and my dad was not in a position to be much of a help, either.”

As an adult, he became familiar with the streets, a powerful drug and the criminality that came with it.

Lagrew’s four mugshots, dating from 1993 to 2004, show his face growing increasingly creased and weathered. It’s those images that still haunt him, he said, recalling the time a St. Johns bar — which had a Faces of Meth poster displayed – refused him service.

“Everybody kept saying, ‘That’s him. That’s him,'” he said. “Finally they asked me to leave. It was not a campaign against methamphetamines; it was an attack on people.”

Faces of Meth made him recognizable, allowing strangers to judge him, he said. His response was to give in.

“Before I didn’t care. I didn’t care about the consequences of my drug use,” he said. “I didn’t care about my family.”

A decade later, Lagrew still resents the campaign’s creator, Deputy Bret King, and The Oregonian for writing about it.

But at his graduation, a smiling Lagrew took photos of friends collecting diplomas.

When asked who had secured a job, Lagrew shot up his hand proudly. He has two — one in a warehouse and another delivering spas.

Recently Lagrew was offered a house manager position with the nonprofit Bridges to Change. He hopes to work as an addictions counselor in the future.

“I failed as a drug addict, I failed as a criminal, and I can’t fail at this,” he said. “This has got to work.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/index.ssf/2014/12/faces_of_meth_10_years_later_i_1.html

 

549ba7130e66f_imageShe started using marijuana at 6 and turned to methamphetamine at 15 when her nightmares persisted after being raped for the second time in two years.

Now 25, Ashley Greylock has three happy children and a career and has been drug-free for more than three years.

As a young girl, Greylock saw her parents abuse drugs and alcohol.

She said her mother was an addict, her stepfather wasn’t involved and her father was in and out of prison.

She basically raised her younger brother and sister — who were twins — from the time she was 8-11.

When she was 13, her aunt and uncle moved her from Sutter to Utah just as Child Prote tive Services came to take the children out of the unstable home environment.

She saw her siblings one more time and talked with them a few other times before contact was cut off.

She hasn’t seen or heard from them in a decade.

“I want them to know that I love them and think about them,” Greylock said. “It breaks my heart that I don’t know them like I should.”

While Greylock was living in Utah from age 13-16, she became a methamphetamine dealer.

She later earned her high school diploma while living with her grandmother in southern California.

Once she moved back to Yuba-Sutter, she continued using and began dealing again.

“Hustling was easy money and an easy way to make it,” Greylock said.

All of that came to an abrupt end in July 2011 when police raided her Yuba City home.

“Seeing the look on my oldest’s face when CPS ripped her out of my arms is what made me realize I needed to get clean,” Greylock said. “My kids deserved better than what I was giving them.”

She checked into Progress House, a recovery home that helped her with her substance abuse, for the next seven months.

She then got married and checked into the Salvation Army Depot in Marysville, where she would spend the next year — six months inpatient and six outpatient — staying clean and learning strategies to prepare herself for a successful transition to the outside world.

The rehabilitation center tested her commitment.

“When I came there, I thought I knew it all,” Greylock said. “They are pretty strict, but that’s what I needed.”

She bonded with counselors and said Steve Cordova helped out a lot.

“There were times I got upset and wanted to leave, and Steve talked me out of it,” Greylock said. “Those people are willing to love you until you are willing to love yourself.”

Now coming up on three years since she first checked into the Salvation Army Depot, Greylock is giving back.

She is the chairperson of the weekly Alcoholic Anonymous meetings, and she is the sponsor for three others who are going through the program.

“She is a big help,” Cordova said of Greylock.

While she was living at the Depot, she stayed out of trouble and attended the classes, Cordova said.

“When I get clients that really want to change their lives, it makes my job much easier,” Cordova said.

Greylock has worked the past 21⁄2 years for In-Home Support Services, a state program that provides assistance to disabled, blind, or those over 65 who can’t remain in their homes safely without assistance.

Greylock is grateful for all that she has and she hopes to be a positive example to her children.

“Life is way better than it was,” Greylock said. “As long as I keep doing the next right thing, things keep falling into place.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.appeal-democrat.com/news/giving-and-receiving-mother-turns-her-life-around-after-losing/article_8d5fd64a-8bf8-11e4-b1e6-2f094b908ae6.html