HOMOSASSA — Two Homosassa men are facing charges after deputies said they busted a methamphetamine lab inside one of the men’s apartments.

Peter Arnow, 68, and Sean Kinney, 50, are facing several charges in connection with their arrests, which happened Wednesday.

According to the Citrus County Sheriff’s Office, officers were preparing to execute a search warrant at the apartments on Miss Maggie Drive when they saw Arnow leave one of the units.

Peter Arnow, 68 (left), and Sean Kinney, 50 (right), are facing several charges in connection with their arrests, which happened Wednesday.

 

Deputies conducted a traffic stop, during which a K-9 unit discovered a small pill bottle containing hydromorphone, the report said. They also said they found a receipt for lye and a straw that contained a residue that tested positive for methamphetamine.

At the same time, deputies arrested Kinney, who was in one of the apartments. Deputies said that after they had read Kinney his Miranda rights, he told them he would show them where everything was.

Kinney later admitted to manufacturing methamphetamine, and that Arnow had been supplying him with Sudafed, the report said. Deputies said Kinney also told them Arnow sometimes helped buy the chemicals used to make meth, and in return he would give him some of the final product.

The report goes on to say that Kinney then told them Arnow would use the meth and sell it, and that the two men had been doing this since November 2012. They say Arnow later confirmed this in an interview.

According to deputies, they seized all of the materials and supplies used to manufacture the methamphetamine, and that the cooking mechanisms tested positive for meth. Those materials will be destroyed at the landfill, deputies said.

Both men were taken to the Citrus County Detention Facility, where they are being held on a total bond of $205,500.

 

 

 

 

http://www.baynews9.com/content/news/baynews9/news/article.html/content/news/articles/bn9/2013/1/9/homosassa_men_charge.html

 

INDEPENDENCE — Officers with multiple police agencies arrested 11 people in Independence early this morning, shutting down a large drug distribution network.

At about 4 a.m. Wednesday, Oregon State Police SWAT and a Polk County Special Response Team served search warrants in three locations in Independence in the culmination of a seven-month investigation.

“The drug trafficking organization being shut down today has been responsible for sales and distribution of significant quantities of methamphetamine and other drugs in our communities in Polk County through organized drug trafficking from other states,” said Polk County Sheriff Bob Wolfe. “The POINT Team has done an outstanding job today for our community and the safety of our children in shutting down this operation.”

The investigation began with the Polk County Interagency Narcotics Team (POINT). As the investigation grew, POINT was assisted by the Oregon Department of Justice, Oregon State Police and other mid-valley drug teams.

“Our first concern is always the safety of the public and the law enforcement officers involved,” said Independence Police Chief Vern Wells. “Due to our low staffing levels and the complexity of these types of investigations, I requested the assistance of outside agencies to quickly and safely secure the target properties.”

Arrested were:

* Juan Jose Virelas-Solorzano, 34, of Independence on charges of racketeering, six counts of delivering methamphetamine and one count of delivering cocaine. Bail: $6.7 million.

* Noralba Virelas-Pineda, 32, of Independence on charges of delivering methamphetamine, delivering heroin, conspiracy to deliver methamphetamine and conspiracy to deliver heroin. Bail: $2 million.

* Noe Nunez-Manzo, 28, of Independence on charges of racketeering and two counts of delivering methamphetamine. Bail $6.7 million.

* Jose Bertin Cruz-Estrada, 22, of Independence on charges of racketeering and conspiracy to deliver methamphetamine. Bail: $500,000.

* Collene Amelia Walker, 37, of Independence on a charge of conspiracy to deliver methamphetamine.

* Raul Megel Rodriquez, 29, of Independence on a charge of conspiracy to deliver methamphetamine. Bail: $50,000.

* Brenda Diaz-Diaz, 21, of Keizer on a charge of conspiracy to deliver methamphetamine. Bail: $40,000.

* Efrain Aispuro-Carrasco, 44, of Independence on charges of racketeering, 11 counts of delivering methamphetamine and two counts of conspiracy to deliver methamphetamine. Bail: $6.7 million.

* Rafael Telliz-Solorzano, 38, of Independence on charges of possession of methamphetamine and delivery of methamphetamine. Bail: $1 million.

* Roberto Ruiz-Sandoval, 42, of Independence on charges of racketeering and two counts of conspiracy to deliver methamphetamine. Bail: $6.7 million.

* Lisandro Rangel-Garcia, 22, of charges of racketeering, five counts of conspiracy to deliver methamphetamine and conspiracy to deliver cocaine. Bail: $6.7 million.

Thirteen agencies and drug teams took part in the early morning search and arrests. The investigation began in July 2012 with a series of controlled buys of illegal drugs from suspects.

Additionally, two suspects were arrested before today’s operation:

On Dec. 8, a car carrying drugs to Polk County was stopped in Douglas County. Inside the vehicle were 6.5 pounds of methamphetamine, one pound of heroin and one pound of unidentified powder.

The driver and passenger, Sergio Gustavo Pineda-Villanueva, 23, and Faliciano Ayala-Cardenas, 31, were taken to Douglas County Jail, both on charges of racketeering, distribution of methamphetamine and distribution of heroin. Pineda-Villanueva is being held on $200,000 bail and an ICE hold and Ayala-Cardenas is being held on $100,000 bail and an ICE hold.

Four minor children of Virelas-Solorzano and Virelas-Pineda were taken into protective custody and will be placed in foster care.

The estimated street value of all drugs seized during this operation is $120,000 in methamphetamine and $19,000 for heroin.

 

 

 

 

http://www.polkio.com/ns/news/24799/1-9-breaking-news-major-drug-bust-in-independence

 

The Southern Nevada Drug Task Force’s participation in the largest methamphetamine seizure in Clark County history has garnered national recognition.

The joint operation involving federal and local law enforcement agencies was honored with the Outstanding Investigative Effort Award for its seizure of 208 pounds of methamphetamine in July.

“It’s a huge dent,” Metropolitan Police Department officer Jose Hernandez said.

The seizure and subsequent arrests helped to dismantle three large drug-trafficking organizations, police officials said.

In a 2½-year period, the drug task force seized about 480 pounds of methamphetamine, 42 pounds of heroin, 21 pounds of cocaine, 37 pounds of marijuana and more than 86,000 outdoor marijuana plants.

The task force is comprised of members from the Metropolitan Police Department, Henderson Police Department, North Las Vegas Police Department, Clark County district attorney’s office and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration.

 

 

 

http://www.lvrj.com/news/drug-task-force-receives-national-honor-for-methamphetamine-seizure-186189401.html

 

MORGAN COUNTY, Ala. (WHNT) – A female sex offender faces various charges after not registering a recent move, according to Morgan County Sheriff Ana Franklin.

Sheriff Franklin said the Morgan County Special Victims Unit arrested Kelly Dianna Allen, 35, on January 9. She is charged with failure to register a move and possession of methamphetamine. Allen is being held in the Morgan County Jail.

Arrest mugshot of Kelly Dianna Allen (Morgan County Sheriff' Office)

Arrest mugshot of Kelly Dianna Allen

 

Sheriff Franklin said Allen must register a move in accordance with the Sexual Offenders Registration Notification Act. She had failed to register a move on January 3, 2013, according to Investigator Eric Fields.

Allen’s previous address was registered as 22 Culver Road, as of December 19, 2012. Investigators determined she had not been staying there.

 

 

 

 

 

http://whnt.com/2013/01/09/sheriff-sex-offender-fails-to-register-move-also-caught-with-meth/

 

USERS of methamphetamine, or ”ice”, are five times likelier to suffer psychotic symptoms while taking the drug, according to a groundbreaking new Australian study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Psychiatry (JAMA Psychiatry).

Rebecca Mcketin is a senior research fellow at the National drug and Alcohol Research Centre at the University of NSW.

Dr Rebecca McKetin

 

The study’s lead author, Dr Rebecca McKetin, said that ”there have always been questions about causality from those who say methamphetamine users aren’t ‘turned mad’ by the drug but have a pre-existing psychotic condition. What’s unique about this study is that it excludes those users and still finds such a strong link between use and psychotic symptoms in a large cohort over a period of years”.

Dr McKetin, formerly of the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre in Sydney and now at the Australian National University, said she was surprised by the strength of the results but that they will ”come as no surprise to police officers in Kings Cross who report anecdotally about users who will ‘go mad’ one day and not the next”.

The authors studied 278 methamphetamine users from Sydney and Brisbane over a four-year period between 2006 and 2010. A correlation between methamphetamine use and psychosis had already been found by many studies, but it was uncertain how many of those ice-users had an existing psychotic condition, characterised by hallucinations and delusions of being persecuted. What made the present study original and significant was that it followed the users over an extended period, and it excluded anyone with existing psychotic tendencies.

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In the four years the drug-users were observed, the results were compelling. The incidence of psychosis went up sharply with the amount of methamphetamine being used. When participants were abstinent, the likelihood of psychotic episodes dropped to 7 per cent; those who were using the drug one to 15 times a month had a 27 per cent likelihood of suffering an episode, and those using more than 16 times a month had a 48 per cent likelihood. Among all users, the odds of suffering a psychotic episode were 5.3 times greater when they were using than when they were abstinent.

These were all people who had not been sufferers before. Of those episodes, 71 per cent involved suspiciousness and paranoia, 51 per cent were hallucinations, and 35 per cent included periods of delusional thinking. There was a strong connection between psychoses and polydrug use (most of the subjects also smoked cannabis and tobacco and drank alcohol frequently), but once these factors were adjusted for, there remained a link between psychosis and methamphetamine use.

Given the strength of the connection between heavy use and psychosis, the authors wrote, ”there is a good argument for providing methamphetamine treatment as a first-line intervention to reduce rates of psychosis among this population”. At present, users suffering a psychotic episode are most likely to come into contact with hospital emergency departments and police. As well as hospitalisation, methamphetamine use has been involved in numerous crimes of violence since the drug was first widely used in Australia 15 years ago.

After a period in which legislation limiting precursor drugs such as pseudoephedrine cut the supply of ice, Dr McKetin said ”there are telltale signs that methamphetamine is making a comeback in Australia”. She said the key to treatment was to put users on a long-term treatment plan akin to that which is given to sufferers from paranoid schizophrenia, ”instead of treating them for the episode and then turning them back onto the street”.

 

http://www.smh.com.au/national/health/ice-users-likely-to-suffer-psychosis-on-drug-study-finds-20130109-2cgr7.html

 

The King County Sheriff’s Office took 1.5 pounds of methamphetamine and $4,000 from a Kent house Saturday morning, and arrested two residents, spokeswoman Sgt. Cindi West said today.

Deputies also found body armor, brass knuckles, spring loaded knives, and materials generally used to package and weigh drugs, she said.

Officials served the warrant about 6:30 a.m. at the home in the 13900 block of Southeast 272nd Street, as part of an investigation that started last summer into the sale of methamphetamine.

A 48-year-old man and a 42-year-old woman who live at the house were arrested and booked into King County Jail, West said.

 
 
 

Brownsville, Texas – U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers at the Brownsville and Matamoros International Bridge intercepted a load of alleged methamphetamine and cocaine. CBP officers discovered the alleged narcotics, valued at approximately $921,500, hidden within a Ford F-150.

On January 7, 2013 CBP officers working primary at Brownsville and Matamoros International Bridge encountered a 2008 Ford F-150 driven by a man. A CBP officer’s primary examination resulted in the vehicle, its driver, identified as a 35-year-old and his passenger identified as a 31-year-old, both United States citizens and residents of Weslaco, Texas being referred to CBP secondary for further examination. While in secondary, CBP officers discovered 28 hidden packages within the Ford’s body. CBP officers removed the packages from the vehicle which held a combined total weight of 21.08 kilograms (20.7 pounds) of alleged methamphetamine and 3.18 kilograms (7 pounds) of alleged cocaine.

The alleged methamphetamine from this seizure has an estimated street value of approximately $697,500 and the alleged cocaine has an estimated street value of approximately $224,000. CBP officers seized the narcotics and the vehicle and turned the men over to Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) special agents for further investigation.

“CBP officers have stopped 25 packages with alleged methamphetamine and three packages with alleged cocaine that will not reach the streets of the Rio Grande Valley,” said Michael T. Freeman, CBP Port Director, Brownsville. “I applaud our officers’ vigilance on the frontline as they continue to keep our homeland safe from would-be smugglers and their dangerous drugs.”

 

 

 

 

http://www.myharlingennews.com/?p=35391

 

CHARLOTTE, NC (WBTV) – On the same day North Carolina’s Attorney General Roy Cooper announced new statistics for meth lab busts, a local counselor told WBTV it’s not enough to fix the problem.

Meth lab busts in NC in 2012 are up 34% from 2011. Law enforcement officers have taken down 466 labs across the state. Burke and Caldwell Counties have some of the highest numbers in the state with 24 and 26 labs found last year. And deputies are finding more labs near Charlotte, with three in Mecklenburg county, and more in surrounding counties.

WBTV talked to an addiction counselor at New Beginnings in Gastonia. Eugene Kaplan told us the problem is not going away any time soon.

“It’s such a powerful drug. And it’s so hard to get off of, and it does so much damage,” said Kaplan, referring to the powerfully addictive drug Meth.

Kaplan says the key is treating the addiction that fuels the use of Meth. Private treatment programs can cost tens of thousands of dollars, and some state programs have a waiting list weeks long, which doesn’t typically work for addicts who choose to go into treatment. “If they don’t go now, they don’t go,” said Kaplan.

Kaplan says the state needs more money to fund treatment centers and to provide more staff to help addicts cut through the red tape he says often hinders treatment.

“If somebody gets diagnosed with lung cancer and they don’t get treatment, what are their chances? If somebody gets diagnosed with an addiction and they don’t get treatment what’s their chances of living?” said Kaplan.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.wbtv.com/story/20536801/addiction-counselor-meth-problem-has-no-easy-fix

 

Smuggled in from Burma and North Korea, meth is flooding Chinese mean streets

RUILI – At 38 Ruijing Street in the small town of Ruili, in the southwest Yunnan province, there is a constant flow of drug addicts coming and going.

Under the watchful eye of a dozen prostitutes waiting for their clients, an addict enters this rundown house every three minutes. Shidian, 22, comes out with doses of bingdu, a methamphetamine known in the West as “crystal meth” or “ice” for its crystalline texture.

 “I started using two or three years ago. In Ruili, its cheaper,” says the young man.

The Yunnan province in southwestern China, near the border with Burma (Myanmar), was once known for its booming heroin trade. Today, methamphetamines have taken over the market, as synthetic drugs grow more popular in the country.

In 2011, 65% of Chinese addicts were heroin users, down 13% since 2008. According to the National Drug Control Commission, methamphetamine users now make up 23% of addicts, up from 9% in 2008.

These synthetic drugs are mostly used by youths – nearly 70% of users are under 35 – who are trying hard drugs for the first time. Many start with methamphetamines then turn to ecstasy and ketamine – drugs once reserved to the rich customers of Hong Kong clubs and that are now making strides to mainland China.

In Ruili, bingdu crystals (bingdu literally means “ice drug”) cost about five yuan (80 cents) a dose. The average wage in this region is about 830 yuan ($133). Shidian doesn’t have a job. He borrows money from his girlfriend to pay for his daily dose – up to 100 yuan ($16). The further away from the Burmese border, the higher the price of methamphetamine. He would pay three times that amount in Baoshan, his hometown 250 kilometers east of Ruili, and much more in Shanghai or Beijing.

“In bars, young people are introduced to bingdu by their friends. It’s for recreational use at first,” says Zhang Yongan, director of the center for anti-drug policy studies at Shanghai University. “That explains why its popularity rose so fast in rich cities. Meanwhile, heroin remains the drug of choice of marginalized rural Chinese or migrant workers living on the outskirts of urban areas.”

Wang Yaqing has seen this evolution in Xuanwei, a southwestern city of 1.2 million people. She heads an organization that helps drug addicts and finds the lack of prevention policies regrettable. “I’ve never seen a bingdu addict get clean, because most refuse to admit its effects are lethal.”

In her town, information about the dramatic consequences of methamphetamine use is limited to a once-a-year awareness “open day” organized by the police, as well as posters with standardized messages like “Fighting the war of the people against drugs.” The volunteer activist sees the new Internet cafes and gaming arcades as another sign of the growing influence of bingdu. “When an addict smokes he feels a strong euphoria. The next day, he’s exhausted but still unable to sleep so he spends time in front of a computer screen or an arcade game.”

Dealers know they’re unlikely to get caught because the police are mostly trained to fight heroin use. “Before, heroin was as easy to buy as Chinese cabbage but now to find some, you need to have good contacts – while bingdu is available everywhere,” says Wang. Five police cars drove by Ruijing Street that evening, and more over the next three days but none stopped at number 38.

Criminal networks capitalize

Burma isn’t the only source for drugs. Methamphetamines in northeastern China usually comes from North Korea. It’s unclear whether Korean bingdu is produced by organized crime gangs or if the Korean government is directly involved. “Beijing must have an idea but the issue is too embarrassing. For geopolitical reasons, China supports North Korea on the international stage. It also supports Burma. Either directly or by negligence, these two neighbors supply the “ice” affecting its population,” explains a Chinese researcher.

The growing demand is pushing some networks to localize part of their production in China. Authorities say they shut down 244 underground labs in 2008, 378 in 2010, mostly producing methamphetamines. “For criminal organizations, setting up labs in China is logical because the country has become a major market. And the pharmaceutical elements that are needed to make these synthetic drugs are easily found there,” says Gary Lewis, from the UN bureau against drugs and criminality in the East-Asia/Pacific region.

In Kunming, the capital of the Yunnan province, authorities are trying to restrict access to pseudoephedrine, a basic element in the production of “crystal meth.” A tough job as it is the most popular cold remedy.

 

 

 

 

http://www.worldcrunch.com/culture-society/how-methamphetamines-replaced-heroin-as-china-039-s-new-drug-of-choice/china-drugs-methamphetamine-crystal-meth-ice/c3s10326/

 

QUINCY, Illinois — Authorities in western Illinois say a drug bust at a Quincy home turned up more than 500 containers used to make methamphetamine.

Illinois State Police Master Sgt. Patrick Frazier on Monday told The Quincy Herald-Whig (http://bit.ly/11bvGol ) that it’s the biggest bust he’s seen involving such “one-pot” shake-and-bake labs. Officers also found more than 180 cans of starter fluid, cans of drain cleaner and used boxes of pills that contain a key meth-making ingredient.

A special truck had to be called to handle the meth waste. The building has been quarantined.

The two people who lived in the home are now charged with participation in methamphetamine manufacturing. That’s a Class 1 felony punishable by between four and 15 years in prison and a fine of up to $25,000.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/2f0bfb4201da4483bd901be903b56e32/IL–Quincy-Meth-Bust

 

Meth labs are on the rise in Tennessee. The Tennessee Methamphetamine Task Force says early numbers show 2012 was one of the worst years with around 1,800 meth lab busts.

With two recent arrests in Blount County this past weekend, 10News checked into the numbers there and found in 2010 there were five meth lab busts. In 2011, there were 12 busts. 2012 brought 20 meth lab busts. And so far in 2013 there have been two meth lab busts.

 

Michael Aaron Bishop, 28, and Jeremy Dale Robinson, 30, were both arrested Friday after Blount County authorities discovered their first meth lab of the year at the Executive Lodge motel in Alcoa. Investigators found a bag with a “one pot” method meth lab, also known as a “shake and bake” method. The Blount County Sheriff’s Office said the meth was not cooked at the motel.

One day later, the Fifth Judicial Drug Task Force (comprised of deputies and officers of the Blount County Sheriff’s Office, Alcoa Police Department, and Maryville Police Department) was called to the Big K-mart on McCammon Avenue in Maryville where investigators found another “one pot” meth lab in a backpack in a grassy area near the store’s parking lot. Deputies say evidence shows meth had been recently cooked.

Maryville resident Wilford Myers is very concerned about the increase. He said, “It’s just a disgrace to our county, you know. And putting people’s lives in jeopardy and these kids and stuff, I’m just totally against it.”

Tom Farmer with the Tennessee Methamphetamine Task Force said the “one pot” meth labs account for about 85 percent of the busts across the state. He also said the “one pot” method is by far the most dangerous method of them all because it’s not a matter of “if” an explosion will occur, but rather “when” an explosion will occur.

Authorities are expecting 2013 to be an even bigger year for meth busts, as the state’s number of busts is already in the double digits, averaging seven meth lab busts a day.

 

 

 

 

http://www.wbir.com/news/article/248610/2/More-meth-labs-popping-up-in-Tennessee

 

DOTHAN, AL – On January 5, 2013 the Dothan Police Department responded to the 3300 block of South Oates Street in reference to a possible vehicle accident. When police arrived they located a red Ford Expedition in the ditch of the north bound lane with no driver. The vehicle was still in gear running with the rear wheels spinning. During the investigation police learned that the vehicle was registered to Russell Teal. Simultaneously, a second officer responding to the area arrived and observed a man walking away from the vicinity and identified him as Russell Teal. Officers noted Teal appeared to be intoxicated and nervous and was unable to speak clearly. As the roadside investigation continued, officers discovered Teal was in possession of a bag of Methamphetamine. Teal was arrested on scene and charged for narcotics with an ongoing investigation regarding the single car crash.

• Russell Teal, white male, 39 years of age, of Third Avenue was arrested and charged with Unlawful Possession of a Controlled Substance with a $5,000 bond. All persons arrested are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

 

 

 

 

http://www.wtvy.com/home/headlines/Accident-Leads-to-Methamphetamine-Arrest-185913872.html

 

CLARKSVILLE, TENN. — A Clarksville man and woman were arrested around 1 p.m. on Saturday for manufacturing methamphetamine, according to a police warrant.

Police contacted James Lawrence Willard, 30, outside his residence on Tulip Poplar Court, and during a consensual search of the residence, police found numerous baggies containing white powder, five blue pills imprinted with A 215, four shotguns, a .38 revolver, assorted ammunition for the firearms and assorted drug paraphernalia, the warrant said.

After a test was conducted, the white powder tested positive for methamphetamine, the warrant said. Police also determined the pills to be Oxycodone.

Willard, who gave a 14 Tulip Poplar Ct. address, was charged with initiate process to manufacture methamphetamine, possession of a firearm during felony, two counts of unlawful drug paraphernalia, two counts of manufacturing, selling, and delivering opiates, and manufacturing, selling and delivering cocaine. His bond was set at $175,000.

Stephanie Jean Willard, 31, who also gave a 14 Tulip Poplar Court address, was charged with initiate process to manufacture methamphetamine, possession of firearm during felony, manufacturing, selling and delivering opiates, and unlawful drug paraphernalia. Her bond was set at $100,000.

 

 

 

 

http://www.theleafchronicle.com/article/20130106/NEWS01/301060014/Man-woman-arrested-manufacturing-methamphetamine

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.theleafchronicle.com/article/20130106/NEWS01/301060014/Man-woman-arrested-manufacturing-methamphetamine

 

Four Unicoi County residents were arrested over the weekend by the Unicoi County Sheriff’s Department for their alleged involvement in operating a methamphetamine lab in a county residence.

 

Marina E. Guyer, 19, 200 Blakenship Lane Lot #14, Erwin was charged with manufacture of methamphetamine, maintaining a dwelling where drugs are used or sold and possession of drug paraphernalia. Nathaniel James Effler, 23, of the same address, was also charged with manufacturing methamphetamine, maintaining a dwelling where drugs are used or sold and possession of drug paraphernalia. Cody R. Roberts, 20, and Misty Dawn Potter, 36, both of 296 Blaine White Road, Erwin, were each charged with manufacturing methamphetamine.

 According to a release from the sheriff’s department, UCSD Patrol Sgt. Gregg Copp was dispatched to Guyer’s and Effler’s Blankenship Lane residence on Saturday to conduct a welfare check on Guyer and Effler. The release states the grandmother of on the two residents has requested the check after finding the door to the residence open and items from within the residence lying on the front porch. The grandmother also reported a strange smell coming from inside the residence, the release states.

 After making entry into the residence, Copp, who is a trained clandestine drug lab technician, identified an active methamphetamine lab which had ruptured, according to the sheriff’s department. Copp also identified other chemicals used in the methamphetamine manufacturing process, the sheriff’s department release states.

 Officers from the sheriff’s department, the Erwin Police Department and the Tennessee Methamphetamine Task Force responded to dismantle the lab. Two additional apparatuses which had been used to manufacture methamphetamine were also recovered during the dismantling process, and all of the hazardous waste was turned over to the Tennessee Methamphetamine Task Force’s disposal technician, according to sheriff’s department officials.

 UCSD Chief Deputy Frank Rogers said investigation revealed that Potter and Roberts were also involved in manufacturing methamphetamine out of the Blakenship Lane residence.

 Three of the four arrested appeared in Unicoi County General Sessions Court on Monday. A $2,000 corporate bond was set for Guyer, s $50,000 corporate bond was set for Effler, and a $75,000 corporate bond was set for Potter. All four of those arrested are scheduled to appear in Sessions Court on Jan. 17.

 

 

http://www.johnsoncitypress.com/News/article.php?id=104085

 

CRESTWOOD, Mo. (AP) – A St. Louis County town has passed a law aimed at assuring home buyers or renters that a home is methamphetamine-free.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports Crestwood recently passed a law requiring the owner of any structure that housed a meth lab to thoroughly clean it before it can be sold or rented. Experts say chemicals from the drug can settle on curtains, the floor and furniture.

 

 

 

http://www.komu.com/news/st-louis-county-town-passes-home-methamphetamine-law/

 

Two people were charged Dec. 30 after state police found methamphetamine as they executed a search warrant at a home in the Town of Bradford, police announced Monday.

A state police tactical response team and contaminated crime scene team executed a search warrant at the home of Jonathan A. Fernandes, 35, of state Route 226. Police said they found methamphetamine inside the home.

Jonathan Fernandes

 Jonathan Fernandes
 
Joseph Fernandes

Joseph Fernandes

Fernandes was charged with second-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance.

His father, Joseph L. Fernandes Jr., 57, of a different address on state Route 226, was charged with second-degree obstructing governmental administration. Police said he interfered with their investigation.

Police seized methamphetamine and firearms.

Both were arraigned Dec. 30 in Bradford Town Court. Jonathan Fernandes was sent to Steuben County Jail without bail. Joseph Fernandes was sent to Steuben County Jail in lieu of $5,000 cash or $10,000 property bond.

A Steuben County Jail booking officer on Monday would not say whether either person was held in the jail.

 

 

 

http://www.stargazette.com/article/20130107/NEWS01/301070053/Bradford-men-charged-after-police-find-methamphetamine-search?nclick_check=1

 

CLARKSVILLE, TENN. — A Clarksville man and woman were arrested around 1 p.m. on Saturday for manufacturing methamphetamine, according to a police warrant.

Police contacted James Lawrence Willard, 30, outside his residence on Tulip Poplar Court, and during a consensual search of the residence, police found numerous baggies containing white powder, five blue pills imprinted with A 215, four shotguns, a .38 revolver, assorted ammunition for the firearms and assorted drug paraphernalia, the warrant said.

After a test was conducted, the white powder tested positive for methamphetamine, the warrant said. Police also determined the pills to be Oxycodone.

Willard, who gave a 14 Tulip Poplar Ct. address, was charged with initiate process to manufacture methamphetamine, possession of a firearm during felony, two counts of unlawful drug paraphernalia, two counts of manufacturing, selling, and delivering opiates, and manufacturing, selling and delivering cocaine. His bond was set at $175,000.

Stephanie Jean Willard, 31, who also gave a 14 Tulip Poplar Court address, was charged with initiate process to manufacture methamphetamine, possession of firearm during felony, manufacturing, selling and delivering opiates, and unlawful drug paraphernalia. Her bond was set at $100,000.

 

 

 

 

http://www.theleafchronicle.com/article/20130106/NEWS01/301060014/Man-woman-arrested-manufacturing-methamphetamine?nclick_check=1

 

WOLCOTT, Ind. – A tip to the Indiana State Police Methamphetamine Suppression Unit led to the arrest of five individuals in connection with various drug charges, police said.

Police were advised by a local retail store of possible articles purchased that are used in the making of meth.

meth_1352953514268.jpg

 

 

Further investigation by members of the unit turned up an active meth lab in White County.

Three adults and three children were found in the house.

During the investigation, two more adults showed up.

All five adults were taken into custody and transported to the White County Jail in Monticello, a news release said.

White County Department of Children and Family Services were contacted and have taken custody of the children at the residence.

Police advise the public that an anonymous tip to the Meth Suppression Hotline (800-453-4746) could help stop meth use.

 

 

 

 

http://www.theindychannel.com/news/local-news/tip-leads-to-five-methamphetamine-arrests

 

DOBSON — A raid on a meth lab in an Ararat home has resulted in charges against five people, with violations pending against other individuals including the mother of a 2-year-old living there.

Surry County Sheriff Graham Atkinson said Saturday that the search at the residence at 109 Charles Beck Lane Friday resulted in the seizure of a “significant amount” of methamphetamine.

“This was an operation that was selling the product in bulk,” Atkinson said. “Usually we find the meth in packages for individual sale, but at this residence we found the meth packaged in plastic containers. The amount is unknown at this time because we (the sheriff’s office) were assisted by the SBI Clandestine Lab Team, which took custody of the product for analysis and weighing. It was a significant amount.”

 
<p>Donald Ray Beck</p>

Donald Ray Beck

<p>Angela Michelle Beck</p>

Angela Michelle Beck

<p>Steven Edward Gwyn</p>

Steven Edward Gwyn

<p>Jennifer Lora Golding</p>

Jennifer Lora Golding

<p>Andrew Clay Edmonds</p>

Andrew Clay Edmonds

Occupants of the home facing the most extensive violations are Donald Ray Beck, 43, and his wife, Angela Michelle Beck, 41, who are each charged with manufacture of methamphetamine, possession with intent to sell/deliver methamphetamine, maintaining a drug house and possession of precursor chemicals for the production of methamphetamine. The Becks and others found at the residence also are accused of conspiracy to manufacture methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia.

“A lot of processed meth, precursor chemicals and a one-pot style lab were found,” Atkinson said. “There were also long and short guns in the residence, as well as drug paraphernalia such as pipes, needles, etc.”

The Becks were being held in the Surry County Jail Saturday, each under a $150,000 secured bond.

Also arrested were Andrew Clay Edmonds, 19, of the Charles Beck Lane address; Steven Edward Gwyn, 36, of 136 Melissa Drive, Mount Airy; and Jennifer Lora Golding, 27, of Badgett Avenue, Mount Airy. They are facing charges of possession of methamphetamine in addition to conspiracy and possession of drug paraphernalia.

Gwyn and Golding were in custody Saturday under a $15,000 secured bond each, while Edmonds is free on a $15,000 unsecured bond, according to a jail spokesman.

Six people are actually said to have been involved. But a 17-year-old who was there was not arrested since she was allowed to accompany her toddler to Northern Hospital of Surry County for decontamination and evaluation due to being in the presence of methamphetamine.

“We anticipate charging the mother as well as several other people in connection with the meth lab in the coming days,” the sheriff said.

In addition to the drug-related violations pending against the young mother, the case against her could be expanded based on the results of a Department of Social Services investigation of child endangerment. That stems from her and the child living in the home being used as a meth lab.

The county’s Haz Mat Team was called in to assist with decontamination of the toddler.

Authorities’ execution of a search warrant at the Charles Beck Lane home Friday was part of a multi-pronged investigation of methamphetamine production in the county which previously resulted in other arrests.

“We keep connecting people and investigating,” Atkinson said.

 

 

 

 

http://www.mtairynews.com/view/full_story/21324718/article-Meth-raid-occurs-at-home-of-2-year-old?instance=popular

 

Meth goes uptown

Posted: January 7, 2013 in Uncategorized

Urban production, distribution bring more people into drug’s lethal reach

Methamphetamine, the illicit drug that much of America has dismissed as a backwoods rural problem and the punchline to “redneck” jokes, has moved uptown.

And it’s no joke.

<b>Methamphetamine can be produced quickly and easily with 'shake and bake' methods that can be concealed in a backpack.</b>

Methamphetamine can be produced quickly and easily with ‘shake and bake’ methods that can be concealed in a backpack.

 

Meth is almost as deadly in its production process as it is in its consumption, and for that reason alone, its move into cities the size of Nashville, St. Louis and Kansas City, Mo., should concern everyone. And as The Associated Press reported last month, law enforcement authorities have found that gangs are getting in on the action.

If this trend continues, Americans should brace themselves, as they will be confronted with a drug that kills and maims those who manufacture it; is distributed by gang members who will kill and maim to get their money for it; and will kill and maim the people foolish enough to smoke it.

Our state, sadly, is in the thick of this problem. Tennessee has for years vied with Missouri as the rural meth capital of the world. Now, authorities are seizing meth labs in and around Nashville at triple the rate of just a few years ago.

Much of the reason is the newer “shake and bake” production method — smaller, portable and without the tell-tale ammonia odor of the backwoods labs — that allows urban meth production in an apartment, a motel room or the back of a car.

Another reason is that demand for the highly addictive drug has been stoked among urban users by meth brought in from Mexico.

Tennessee and federal agents and task forces are adapting their detection and seizure methods in an attempt to keep up. But a greater public awareness and attitude shift are needed to keep this problem from overwhelming all attempts to stop it.

For the more “uptown” folks who have paid little attention to meth: You probably know it’s made with cold pills, but those are mixed with substances such as battery acid or drain cleaner to make meth. I

ngesting these poisons on a regular basis damages brain functions and can cause heart failure. Users are subject to loss of bone density and dental structure, dangerous weight loss and psychotic episodes.

Meth labs are volatile and frequently explode in flames, killing or disfiguring the makers, and often injuring small children around them, who also suffer from the fumes from meth production.

So, even as we hear in public opinion surveys that more Americans want at least some decriminalization of drug use, let’s be very clear:

With substances such as methamphetamine, we are not in the same ballpark as with marijuana. The consequences of contact with meth are devastating at every level, and the public should take it as seriously as heroin and cocaine, because it’s every bit as addictive and damaging, and possibly more seriously, as a batch can be cooked up as quickly as a trip to the local drugstore and as nearby as the car next to yours.

By the way, meth isn’t used only by lower-income white people ages 30-55 who try it so they can handle double work shifts. The average age of meth users, according to some studies, is 17. Learn about meth, so that you can warn your child to spot it, avoid it and, hopefully, report it to authorities.

This is a case where a “war on drugs” is called for.

 

 

 

 

http://www.tennessean.com/article/20130106/OPINION01/301060050/Meth-goes-uptown?nclick_check=1

 

WOLCOTT, Ind. (WISH) – A tip from a local retail store led to the arrest of five people for various drug charges.

The Indiana State Police Meth Suppression Team was told by a local retail store in Lafayette that possible items were purchased to make meth.

Troopers were able to locate an active meth lab at a home in White County near Wolcott. Also inside, troopers found five adults and three children.

All five adults were taken to the White County Jail, according to a release.

The children were turned over to the White County Department of Children and Family Services.

Merle W. Queen Jr., 42, was arrested and preliminarily charged with Manufacturing Methamphetamine, a Class B Felony, Dealing Methamphetamine, a Class B Felony, Possession of Methamphetamine, a Class D Felony, Neglect of a Child, a Class D Felony, Possession of Two or More Chemical Reagents or Precursors with Intent to Manufacture, a Class D Felony, and Maintaining a Common Nuisance, a Class D Felony.

Jason C. Storms, 38, was arrested and preliminarily charged with Manufacturing Methamphetamine, a Class B Felony, Dealing Methamphetamine, a Class B Felony, Possession of Methamphetamine, a Class D Felony, Possession of Two or More Chemical Reagents or Precursors with Intent to Manufacture, a Class D Felony, and Visiting a Common Nuisance, a Class B Misdemeanor.

Jeff A Roberts, 42, was arrested and preliminarily charged with Manufacturing Methamphetamine, a Class B Felony, Dealing Methamphetamine, a Class B Felony, Possession of Methamphetamine, a Class D Felony, Possession of Two or More Chemical Reagents or Precursors with Intent to Manufacture, a Class D Felony, and Visiting a Common Nuisance, a Class B Misdemeanor.

Jennifer L. Parks, 35, was arrested and preliminarily charged with Manufacturing Methamphetamine a Class B Felony, Dealing Methamphetamine, a Class B Felony, Possession of Methamphetamine, a Class D Felony, Neglect of a Child, a Class D Felony, Possession of Two or More Chemical Reagents or Precursors with Intent to Manufacture, a Class D Felony, and Maintaining a Common Nuisance, a Class D Felony.

Karen Faye Sherer, 49, was arrested and preliminarily charged with Visiting a Common Nuisance, a Class B Misdemeanor.

 

 

 

 

http://www.wishtv.com/dpp/news/crime/tip-from-store-leads-to-5-meth-arrests

 

POPLARVILLE — Pearl River County Sheriff’s Department narcotics investigators checking on a community complaint found evidence of the manufacture of methamphetamine at a Poplarville area home.

The investigation took place on Dec. 14, after the department received a community complaint that methamphetamine was possibly being manufactured at a home located on Humphrey Road near Poplarville.

When the investigators arrived, the residents of the home, 30-year-old Kenneth Smith and 29-year-old Latasha Gambill, were not there but the investigators noticed several burn piles that contained the remnants of old methamphetamine cooks, said Chief Investigator Donnie Saucier.

Investigators waited for the suspects to return home at which time they were taken into custody and searched.The investigators found methamphetamine, marijuana, Lortab and Xanax in their possession, Saucier said. In the home, investigators found several precursor chemicals used to manufacture methamphetamine, Saucier said.

Both Smith and Gambill were charged with conspiracy to manufacture a controlled substance, possession of precursor chemicals, generation of hazardous waste, possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute, possession of marijuana and an additional charge of manufacture of a controlled substance was placed on Smith, Saucier said. Smith was on parole with the Mississippi Department of Corrections at the time of his arrest leading to a hold with MDOC being placed on him, Saucier said.

 
 

 

http://picayuneitem.com/local/x1633443674/Two-charged-with-methamphetamine-violations

 

SURRY COUNTY, N.C. — Deputies say five people were charged after a meth lab was raided Friday in Ararat and charges are pending against others including the mother of a 2-year-old living at the residence.

Sheriff Graham Atkinson said Saturday that the search of the home at 109 Charles Beck Lane, resulted in the seizure of a significant amount of methamphetamine.

“This was an operation that was selling the product in bulk,” he said. “Usually we find the meth in packages for individual sale, but at this residence we found the meth packaged in plastic containers.”

Jennifer Golding
 
Donald Beck
 
 
Angela Beck
 
Steve Gwyn
 
Andrew Edmonds
 
 

Officials did not say the exact amount seized, citing an ongoing investigation.

PHOTO GALLERY – Faces of Meth: Before and After

Deputies say serving the search warrant was part of a multi-pronged investigation into methamphetamine production in the county, one which has already resulted in other arrests.

“We keep connecting people and investigating,” Atkinson said, according to a prepared statement. “In addition to the arrests we made of the five individuals who were at the home Friday, we will be making other arrests in connection with this lab.”

Atkinson said there were six people in the home Friday and with the exception of the 17-year-old, who was allowed to accompany her toddler to the hospital for decontamination and examination, all were arrested.

Charges against the mother are pending and will be expanded by the results of the Department of Social Services’ investigation into child endangerment since she and her child were living in the meth lab.

The home occupants, Donald Ray Beck, 43, and his wife, Angela Michelle Beck, 41, were both charged with manufacture of methamphetamine, possession with intent to sell/deliver methamphetamine, maintaining a drug house and possession of precursor chemicals for the production of methamphetamine.

All five of the home occupants were charged with conspiracy to manufacture methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia.

Bond for the Becks was set at $150,000 each.

Also arrested were Andrew Clay Edmonds, 19, of the residence, Steven Edward Gwyn, 36, of 136 Melissa Drive, Mount Airy, and Jennifer Lora Golding, 27, of Badgett Avenue, Mount Airy. In addition to conspiracy and possesion of drug paraphernalia, they were also charged with possession of methamphetamine.

“A lot of processed meth, precursor chemicals and a one-pot style lab were found,” Atkinson said. “There were also long and short guns in the residence, as well as drug paraphernalia such as pipes, needles, etc.”

The county’s HAZ MAT team was called to assist with decontamination of the child, who was taken to Northern Hospital of Surry County for evaluation. DSS was called to investigate the child’s presence in the lab.

“We anticipate charging the mother as well as several other people in connection with the meth lab in the coming days,” Atkinson said.

Sheriff Graham Atkinson said there are more suspects involved in the case as more arrests to come but doesn’t believe this is a sign of a meth lab epidemic.

“I don’t think it’s really any worse than it was several years ago it’s just that we’ve kind of hit a hot streak on these right now,” Atkinson said.

The 2-year-old inside the home was treated and released and appears to have no signs of harm from meth exposure.

 

 

 

 

http://myfox8.com/2013/01/05/multiple-people-arrested-after-meth-lab-in-surry-co-raided/

 

LEWISTON, ID – A Clarkston man was charged with a misdemeanor and multiple felonies after a traffic stop by the Lewiston Police Department led to the discovery of methamphetamine.

Officers stopped 18-year-old Justus Courts, at around 9:30 Wednesday evening while he was driving a white Buick in the 3100 block of Highway 12 for a traffic violation. Courts was then approached by an officer who said he noticed Courts acting nervous. Upon further investigation it was determined that Courts had criminal records involving narcotics offenses. Lewiston Police Department Narcotics K-9 Lucy was then taken to the vehicle for inspection.

Traffic stop leads to methamphetamine arrest

Justus Courts

During the search, officers located a hype kit containing a spoon with suspected methamphetamine residue on it and later found a plastic bag containing suspected meth.

Police say that Courts was also in possession of a small digital scale, a methamphetamine/marijuana pipe and prescription methadone without a prescription, a schedule two narcotic.

Courts was arrested and charged with Possession of Drug Paraphernalia as well as Possession of a Controlled Substance with intent to deliver and Possession of methadone without a prescription.

Courts was released from Nez Perce County Jail Thursday afternoon on his recognizance and will appear in court for a preliminary hearing on January 16th.

 

 

 

http://www.klewtv.com/news/local/Traffic-stop-leads-to-methamphetamine-arrest-185606941.html

 

A traffic stop late Thursday night in Anderson led to the arrest of two women whom police said were caught carrying methamphetamine

State police trooper Rich Clay of the Pendleton District was patrolling at about 11:30 p.m. in the area of East 53rd Street and Columbus Avenue on the south side of Anderson when he stopped a Nissan SUV because its headlights were out. Clay later found methamphetamine inside the car with the help of his K-9 partner.

The driver, Alisha Madewell, 27, Anderson, was charged with Class D felonies for manufacturing methamphetamine, possession of precursors to manufacture methamphetamine, possession of a controlled substance, maintaining a common nuisance and operating a vehicle while intoxicated; and a Class A misdemeanor for driving while suspended.

The passenger, Ashley Ann Baker, 25, Middletown, was charged with possession of methamphetamine and visiting a common nuisance, both are Class D felonies.

The two women are being held at Madison County Jail.

 

 

http://www.indystar.com/article/20130104/NEWS02/301040329/Trooper-nabs-2-methamphetamine-suspects-Anderson?nclick_check=1