RENO, Nev. (AP) — A federal grand jury in Reno has indicted six people in connection with an investigation into a drug ring that allegedly distributed more than a pound of methamphetamine.

All six are scheduled to be tried Aug. 28 before Reno Chief U.S. District Judge Robert Jones on charges of conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of methamphetamine between March 7 and June 19.

They also were indicted for illegal use of a cell phone to facilitate drug distribution.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office identified the defendants as 41-year-old David Desjardin, 38-year-old Karen Lynn Gale, 43-year-old Thomas Bridges, 51-year-old Richard Lipke, Jolynn Renee Nolle and Jacqueline “Jackie” Bethmarie Israel.

Prosecutors listed no hometowns for any of the suspects and no ages for Nolle or Israel.

 

 

 

 

http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/US-grand-jury-in-Reno-indicts-6-on-meth-charges-3690177.php

 

 

A Paragould woman was arrested Tuesday on suspicion of felony possession of methamphetamine with intent to deliver and felony possession of drug paraphernalia.According to a probable cause affidavit, a Paragould police dispatcher received more than 30 911 calls where a person asking for medical assistance could be heard, but the dispatcher could not gather enough information to determine a location or an address. Eventually, the operator determined the victim was at 610 South 8th Avenue and dispatched medical personnel and officers to that address, the affidavitsaid.

The affidavit said officers met 54-year-old Goldie R. Hutson at a small apartment at that address. When officers stated the nature of their business to Hutson, she denied that anyone was present in the apartment, according to the affidavit. However when officers told Hutson that a dispatcher had heard someone asking for help, Hutson allowed officers into the apartment where they found a man complaining of chest and abdominal pains, the affidavit said. The affidavit did not state the man’s name and PPD did not release it. The affidavit said the man was sweating profusely, his pupils were dilating and he had a bounding heart rate. The man was taken to Arkansas Methodist Medical Center and officers later discovered he had a number of outstanding warrants both locally and outside the state, according to the affidavit.
 
Hutson mug

The affidavit said officers immediately noticed drugs and paraphernalia scattered in plain view while in the apartment. Police obtained a search warrant for the apartment and seized several articles of drug paraphernalia including scales, baggies, hemostats and pipes, the affidavit said. The affidavit said officers also found 56 grams of a substance that tested positive as a form of methamphetamine in four separate packages as well as a number of tablets of undetermined nature and a small amount of marijuana. Officers also seized $10,962.80, a ledger and a second safe which was secured and held pending an additional warrant, the affidavit said.

Both Hutson and the male suspect are being held in Greene County Jail. Bond for Hutson was set at $100,000.

 
 
 
 
 
 

A couple was sentenced to federal prison and one Mexican immigrant pleaded guilty for intent to distribute methamphetamine in Vermilion Parish.

Tobi Domingue, 35, of Duson, and Aaron Landry, 31, of Mariette, Ga., pleading guilty to possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine, and Jose Angel Ruiz-Cervantes, 27, a citizen of Mexico, pleading guilty to conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine, U.S. Attorney Stephanie A. Finley announced Friday.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Patrick J. Hanna accepted the guilty plea of Corey Domingue, 35, of Opelousas. Domingue pled guilty to conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine and cocaine and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

U.S. District Judge Elizabeth E. Foote sentenced Tobi Domingue to 87 months in prison and four years supervised release; Aaron Landry received 94 months in prison and four years supervised release and Ruiz-Cervantes received 97 months in prison, followed by five years supervised release.

Corey Domingue, Tobi Domingue, Aaron Landry and Ruiz-Cervantes, along with eight co-defendants, were indicted in June of 2009 on a variety of drug trafficking and firearms charges, along with unlawful use of communication facilities. Evidence revealed that this drug trafficking organization was responsible for the movement and sale of meth and cocaine from Mexico into the U.S., and distribution throughout the Acadiana area. The defendants and their co-conspirators possessed and distributed kilograms of drugs.

As part of the conspiracy, Tobi Domingue admitted that she sold methamphetamine with her husband, Corey Domingue, and that she participated in the distribution of approximately three to six kilograms of meth. Aaron Landry acknowledged that he was responsible for the possession and distribution of approximately four kilos of meth, and also acknowledged that he was the owner of numerous firearms.

Ruiz-Cervantes admitted that he was a courier for the methamphetamine and cocaine distribution group and that his role in the conspiracy involved approximately five kilograms of meth. Domingue said during his plea hearing that he possessed with the intent to distribute approximately four kilos of meth and approximately one kilogram of cocaine.

Landry and Corey Domingue agreed to forfeiture of approximately 30 weapons between them, varying from shotguns and pistols to several SKS 7.62mm assault rifles.

“Drug trafficking of any kind is a threat to our communities,” Finley said. “The U.S. Attorney’s Office, along with the Drug Enforcement Administration and our local and state partners, will continue to vigorously investigate, arrest, indict and seek appropriate sentences for anyone who engages in this trade. We are committed to holding drug dealers, from the couriers to leaders, accountable to keep our communities safe.”

This case was investigated by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), the Vermilion Parish Sheriff’s Office and the Lafayette Metro Narcotics Task Force and was prosecuted by Finley.

 

 

 

 

http://www.theadvertiser.com/article/20120706/NEWS01/120706031/Three-drug-traffickers-sentenced-one-pleads-Vermilion-Parish-case?nclick_check=1

 

WOODVILLE, AL(WAFF) –  Jackson County officials arrested seven people after a drug bust Thursday.

Agents searched a home on County Road 86 in Woodville July 5.  Officials seized two three-foot tall marijuana plants, methamphetamine, components to make methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia. Agents also said they found a number of horses living in poor conditions on the property.  Officials said a number of children were present at the residence and subsequently placed in social services‘ custody.  During the search, one of the deputies was attacked by a seven pound Chihuahua and received lacerations. The dog was impounded.  Donald Berry, 43, was charged with manufacture of methamphetamine first degree, possession of methamphetamine, possession of marijuana second degree, unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia, theft of services third degree and animal cruelty.  Kisha Ponce, 21; Alvin Patrick, 39; Charlotte Berry, 43; Bobbie Stewart, 31; Christopher Berry, 22 and Curtis Berry, 22 were charged with manufacture of methamphetamine first degree, possession of methamphetamine, possession of marijuana second degree and possession of drug paraphernalia.  Officers obtained additional warrants for Amanda Berry, 24, and Brandon Berry, 24. Both turned themselves in.  Brandon Berry was charged with first degree unlawful manufacturing of controlled substances, second degree possession of marijuana, possession of controlled substances (methamphetamine), chemical endangerment of a child, and unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia. He was taken to the Jackson County Jail on a $21,000 bond.  Amanda Berry was charged with chemical endangerment of a child and was taken to the Jackson County Jail on a $5,000 bond.

 

 

 

 

http://www.myfoxal.com/story/18965463/chihuhua-attacks-deputy-during-drug-bust

 

Seven people were arrested Thursday after a drug raid in the Woodville community of Jackson County, Ala., authorities say.

Among the charges were manufacture of methamphetamine, possession of methamphetamine and marijuana and animal cruelty, according to a news release from the Jackson County Sheriff’s Office.

Clockwise from top left:Bobbie Stewart, Alvin Patrick. Donald Berry, Charlotte Berry, Christopher Berry, Kisha Ponce, Curtis Berry

Clockwise from top left:Bobbie Stewart, Alvin Patrick. Donald Berry, Charlotte Berry, Christopher Berry, Kisha Ponce, Curtis Berry

 

The raid was made at a home on County Road 86 in Woodville , where marijuana plants, methamphetamine, chemicals and items used in the manufacture of methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia were found, the release said.

One person also was charged with animal cruelty because of poor living conditions for several horses on the property and also with theft of services for “bootlegging” electrical service, the release said.

The people were arrested were:

Donald Ray Berry, 43, of Woodville, was charged with first-degree manufacture of methamphetamine, possession of methamphetamine, second-degree possession of marijuana, unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia, third-degree theft of Services and animal cruelty.

Kisha Luna Ponce, 21, of Russellville, Ala., was charged with first-degree manufacture of methamphetamine, possession of methamphetamine, second-degree possession of marijuana, unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia.

Alvin Lee Patrick, 39, Woodville, was charged with first-degree manufacture of methamphetamine, possession of methamphetamine, second-degree possession of marijuana, unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia.

Charlotte Virginia Berry, 43, of Woodville, AL was charged with first-degree manufacture of methamphetamine, possession of methamphetamine, second-degree possession of marijuana, unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia.

Bobbie Lynn Stewart, 31, of Gurley, Ala., was charged with first-degree manufacture of methamphetamine, possession of methamphetamine, second-degree possession of marijuana, unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia.

Christopher Eugene Berry, 22, Woodville, was charged with first-degree manufacture of methamphetamine, possession of methamphetamine, second-degree possession of marijuana, unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia.

Curtis Ray Berry, 22, of Woodville, was charged with first-degree manufacture of methamphetamine, possession of methamphetamine, second-degree possession of marijuana, unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia.

All seven remain in the Jackson County Jail and bond has not yet been set for the felony charges, the release said.

Because several small children were present, the Department of Human Resources also was contacted and took custody of the children, the release said.

 

 

 

http://timesfreepress.com/news/2012/jul/06/7-charged-alabama-drug-raid/?breakingnews

 

TIPPECANOE COUNTY, Ind. (WLFI) – Authorities said they found drugs in a woman’s underwear as two Tippecanoe County women face a trio of meth-related felony charges.      Court documents show that on June 27, a state trooper stopped a car on State Road 25 north of Interstate 65 driven by 31-year-old Haley Brooks-Miller of West Point, with 31-year-old Amber Rice of Lafayette in the front seat, along with a male passenger in the back seat.

Mugshot of Haley Brooks-MillerMugshot of Amber Rice

 

Authorities said they found a 74-gram bag of meth on Brooks-Miller and a 50-gram bag of meth on Rice along with drug paraphernalia in the car. When Rice was taken to jail, officers said they found a pipe hidden in her body.  Court documents reveal that Rice told them Brooks-Miller had given the contraband to her when the traffic stop was made. Each woman faces a methamphetamine dealing charge, a methamphetamine possession charge and a charge of possession of a schedule II controlled substance.

 

 

 

 

http://www.wlfi.com/dpp/news/crime/jail-intake-search-finds-pipe-drugs-in-womans-body

 

Thousands of doses of methamphetamine were taken off the streets last week in the largest drug bust this area has ever seen.
The large-scale methamphetamine bust was conducted across Pottawatomie County last Wednesday, June 27, by a joint task force of officers.
District Attorney Richard Smothermon said the scope of this operation, believed to be linked to a Mexican supply line, was enormous.
Smothermon said the operation trafficked close to 20 pounds of methamphetamine over the 28 days the suspects were under surveillance.
The district attorney said authorities used information gained from a traffic stop to procure permission for a wire from the Oklahoma Department of Criminal Appeals. “We have been, for the last 28 days, up on what’s called a wire, listening to the cell phone chatter of a couple of high target individuals,” Smothermon said.
Throughout the first 48 hours of the wire being open, Smothermon said the phones received more than 1,300 drug-related phone calls.
Authorities then followed Linda Ellis and Steven Faulkner, the apparent leaders of the operation locally, as they exchanged $30,000 for two pounds of meth every other day for those 28 days, Smothermon said.
Smothermon estimated the two moved close to 20 pounds of meth throughout the county during the period of wire surveillance.
Faulkner, 53, of Tecumseh, was arrested in Duncan while on the job as a contractor for Rent-A-Center, Smothermon said, and Ellis, 48, of Shawnee, was arrested in the parking lot of a Shawnee Dollar General. In all, 39 people were arrested at several different locations.
Apparently, the base of operations for Ellis and Faulkner was a Tecumseh residence, 802 N. 13th Street, right across the street from Tecumseh High School. The proximity of the drugs to the school brings an additional charge, although there is no evidence that meth was being sold there. A trailer behind the residence was apparently the distribution center for the area.
Tecumseh school officials had no forewarning of the raid, Superintendent Tom Wilsie said. “Bob (Mayo, the district’s maintenance director) saw it as it was happening,” Wilsie said.
Wilsie said the property had been vacant for some time until about a year ago, when he noticed what appeared to be “a lot of work” going on at the site. Since then, there have “always been a ton of cars there.” He said he is “glad to get them off the street.”

 

 

 

http://countywidenews.com/huge-meth-bust-nabs-suspects-center-was-across-from-ths-p5461-100.htm

 

Boonville — July 4 saw the discovery of an alleged methamphetamine laboratory  near the Randolph and Howard County lines. Jacob Strain, 32, of Bunceton, was arrested and charged with a Class B Felony. The individual had prior convictions and was on parole, according to Missouri case.net.
0705_DrugBust.jpg

Jacob Strain, 32, of Bunceton, was arrested on July 4 and charged with a Class B Felony. He is suspected of being involved with the manufacture of methamphetamine

After receiving a dispatch from Moberly 911, Howard County Sheriff Deputies responded to County Road 251, where the alleged incident took place.

Ronnie Byar, a local landowner who placed the call, had dealt with recent theft activity on his property, according to Howard County Sheriff, Charlie Polson.

“Byar had been having problems with theft and suspicious activity on his property. He encountered a silver vehicle. A warning shot was fired by Byar and the vehicle took off,” said Sheriff Polson.

After the 911 call was placed by Byar, the Sheriff’s Department responded to the area. Initially, according to Polson, Byar thought a round may have struck Strain.

Upon arriving at the scene, Deputies discovered an abandoned building of sorts on Byar’s property – which appeared to be a production facility for the manufacture of methamphetamine, according to Sheriff Polson.

Boonville, though drugs are present in the city, rarely sees lab activity within the city limits, according to Chief of Police Bobby Welliver.

“In the old process where they used to make meth, they were almost never inside of the city because of the smell – it was usually done out in the rural areas,” he said.

Methamphetamine is still a problem, though, insists Chief Welliver.

“Now, unfortunately, we’re seeing what’s called shake and bake labs from time to time. This is where ingredients are placed in a 2-liter bottle or other container, and can be shaken together to produce methamphetamine,” said the Chief.

Methamphetamine effects, in users, can produce euphoria and hyper-manic behaviors. After days of use, due to the chemical effects on an individual’s brain conjoined with severe sleep-depravity, psychosis often onsets. Auditory and visual hallucinations are common, according to the website methproject.org.

 

 

 

 

http://www.boonvilledailynews.com/news/x634673505/Meth-lab-bust-Randolph-Howard-County-line

 

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — A Cross Lanes couple was arrested Thursday after allegedly cooking methamphetamine in the presence of their six grandchildren.

After getting a tip that they were making methamphetamine, authorities went to the home of Raymond L. Taylor, 54 and Belinda Williams, 49, of Big Tyler Road in Cross Lanes, according to criminal complaints on file in Kanawha County Magistrate Court.

When they got there, officers found the odor of meth production so overpowering that they immediately evacuated the house and opened all the windows, the complaints say. Officers allegedly found equipment and chemicals used for making meth, and allegedly found a green tin with suspected methamphetamine inside in Williams’ pocket. Williams allegedly told officers she was just trying to make enough money to return to Cincinnati.

The couple’s six grandchildren, who were all between the ages of 11 and 15, were in the house at the time, the criminal complaints say.

Taylor was charged with operating a meth lab and six counts of exposing children to methamphetamine. Williams was charged with operating a meth lab, possession with intent to deliver and six counts of exposing children to methamphetamine.

Taylor and Williams were in the South Central Regional Jail late Thursday, each held on a $160,000 full surety bond.

 

 

 

 

http://sundaygazettemail.com/News/201207050236

 

A ROCKHAMPTON restaurateur has been committed to stand trial, accused of running a clandestine drug laboratory at his Italian bistro and of raping a girl.

Owner and manager of Di Carlos Italian Restaurant Joseph Halaby yesterday showed no emotion as he was committed to stand trial in the Supreme Court at Rockhampton on 19 charges.

 

A ROCKHAMPTON restaurateur has been committed to stand trial, accused of running a clandestine drug laboratory at his Italian bistro and of raping a girl.

Joseph Halaby pictured before the opening of Di Carlos Restaurant.

 

Halaby, an Australian born in Jordan, entered no plea during the committal hearing in Rockhampton.

It is alleged his Fitzroy St restaurant was used to produce an undisclosed quantity of methamphetamine.

Magistrate Barry Cosgrove described it as a complex case of “inextricably intertwined charges”.

The court heard Halaby possessed the necessary chemicals and laboratory equipment to produce dangerous drugs, which he ultimately supplied to minors.

As well as the drug related charges, Halaby is accused of procuring a young girl, under the age of 16, for sex.

It is alleged he plied her with drugs, exposed her to pornography and raped her.

The court heard witness statements suggesting a knife may have been used in the attack.

Police prosecutor Karen Dunham submitted evidence she said included a stain on a pair of the girl’s briefs from semen containing Halaby’s DNA.

Blood samples taken from the girl showed concentrations of methamphetamine and marijuana.

Ms Dunham opposed bail on the strength of the evidence, which also contained numerous witness statements, data reports from mobile phones, including the defendant’s and CCTV footage.

Mr Cosgrove refused the application for bail.

No date has been set for the Supreme Court trial.

Halaby was represented yesterday by Doug Winning of Winning’s Lawyers.

 

 

 

 

http://www.frasercoastchronicle.com.au/story/2012/07/06/bistro-owner-faces-drug-and-rape-charges/

 

Parents on Methamphetamines

Posted: July 6, 2012 in Uncategorized

According to a new study from Baylor University in the U.S., parents who abuse methamphetamines are more likely to harm or neglect their children. This in turn increases the chances of their children being taken into foster care.

Meth and KidsThe study found that for every one percent increase in meth abuse there was a 1.5 percent increase in children ending up in foster care. As the number of meth users continues to rise, this could have disastrous effects both on families and the foster care program.

“Our findings suggest strongly that the social costs of parental meth use include child maltreatment and growth in foster care placements,” said Scott Cunningham, Ph.D., study co-author and assistant professor of economics at Baylor University’s Hankamer School of Business. “To address this, child welfare policies should be designed specifically for the children of meth-using parents.”

The link between methamphetamine abuse and foster care was first noticeable in the 1980’s and 90’s. The U.S. foster care population increased by over 45percent at around the same time meth addiction was becoming prevalent. Scientists have observed similar trends that link any drop in meth production to a similar decrease in foster care admission.

With an estimated 500 metric tons of amphetamine-type stimulants being produced every year, the effects of meth addiction on children are becoming painfully clear. In the U.S. 4.5 percent  of students graduating from high school report having tried methamphetamine at least once in their lifetime. The effects of meth addiction are also hitting the families of addicts. Many children of meth addicts are only able to avoid foster care by moving in with grandparents.

2006 report by the Pew Commission on Children in Foster Care, recommends granting subsidies and other help to grandparents who have been forced to care for their grandchildren. This would ease pressure on the foster care system while still keeping children in a familiar and loving environment.

“Public health professionals have observed these large social costs of methamphetamine production and use,” Finlay said. “Our paper is one of the first to provide plausible causal evidence of these effects that are not borne by users but by children.”

Many of methamphetamines effects on children are due to the type of people using the drug. Women are more likely to use meth than men and use of the drug among pregnant women has also been on the rise. Between 1995 and 2003, there has been an 86 percent increase in the number of pregnant women seeking treatment for meth addiction.

“Given the large social costs of meth use on child maltreatment, policymakers face a significant challenge to reduce its use,” Cunningham said. “Regions with intensive meth use should consider greater resources for meth treatment and child welfare services. These areas have historically been rural or exurban and so may already be underserved. Our study also highlights the social benefits of policies restricting consumer access to methamphetamine ingredients, like pseudoephedrine.”

 

 

 

 

http://technorati.com/lifestyle/article/parents-on-methamphetamines/

 

Seven men were arrested in alleged connection with the seizure of one pound of methamphetamine and more than 3,500 pounds of marijuana from two homes in Norwalk and a storage facility in Pico Rivera.

 

new

Glendale Police Department in collaboration with the DEA and the LAIMPACT Taskforce dismantled a large scale drug distribution organization in the Los Angeles Area.

Seven men were arrested in connection with the seizure of one pound of methamphetamine and more than 3,500 pounds of marijuana from two homes in Norwalk and a storage facility in Pico Rivera.The methamphetamine and marijuana seizure has a street value of more than $4.5 million, according to Glendale Police.
Glendale Police helped dismantle a large scale drug distribution in the Los Angeles area, according to a news release from the department.

The DEA, the LAIMPACT Taskforce and Glendale Police arrested seven suspects in alleged connection with the seizure of one pound of methamphetamine and more than 3,500 pounds of marijuana from the residences 12716 and 12716 ½ Kalnor, Norwalk, and a storage facility at 9441 Slauson, Pico Rivera, police said.

“The seven arrests and significant seizures of methamphetamine and marijuana culminated a several month investigation into a large scale multi-drug trafficking organization in the Los Angeles Area,” according to the news release.

Although the bust was miles from Glendale, officials explained why they helped make the arrests.

“Drugs have no geographical boundaries. To go to the source and eliminate the scourge on our community, we often find ourselves going all over Southern California,” Glendale Police Sgt. Tom Lorenz told Patch via email.

“If you research the history of Glendale Narcotics going back to the 80’s, we are a leader in this area and known for our sophistication and have been recognized for it on levels,” Lorenz said.

Authorities said the methamphetamine and marijuana seizure has a street value of more than $4.5 million.

Those arrested include: Oscar Sanchez, 37, and Guillermo Perez Sanchez, 52–both of Norwalk–Javier Francisco Avila, 29, of Ontario; Luis Alberto Valdivia, 32, of San Luis Obispo; Jetsey Wlises Gaytan, 28, of Perris; Benito Vasquez Lopez, 39, of Anaheim; Jorge Luis Campos, 38, of Altadena.

Bail was held at $100,000 each and the suspects are expected in court on August 29.

The case will be presented to the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office for criminal filing consideration, officials said.

This isn’t the first time Glendale Police has left its jurisdiction in Glendale to bust a drug operation in the Los Angeles-area.

On June 7, Glendale Police busted a major marijuana-growing operation a block from LAPD’s Northeast Community Station, at a former furniture warehouse in the 3400 Block of San Fernando Road, near Tyburn Street.

About 1,000 pot plants were collected, worth about $1.5 million, officials said.

According to a Glendale Police dispatcher who was on duty on the morning the June 7 bust occurred, the raid was a “group effort” involving “lots of intelligence tips” collected over months.

And the story doesn’t end with the warehouse on the 3400 block of San Fernando Road and Tyburn Street—with its reportedly air-conditioned interiors that still had enough moisture to dampen parchment paper covering windows.

“There are multiple locations—in L.A. maybe—different collectives and storefronts,” Cox said.

“It’s possible the LAPD got the info and gave it to us,” said the dispatcher, Jason Cox. “If they don’t have the resources and manpower, we’ll take it on—that happens quite a lot.”

 

 

 

 

http://montrose.patch.com/articles/glendale-police-bust-drug-operation-in-norwalk-and-pico-rivera#photo-10574994

 

HICKORY, N.C. — Officers investigating a suspicious vehicle Sunday night arrested four, including three from Burke County, after finding a suspected methamphetamine cache.

According to a police report, officers charged:

  • Jerico Nathaniel Chapman, 24, of Valdese with possession with intent to manufacture, sell or deliver methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia, felony probation violation and resisting a public officer. Bond: $50,000 secured
  • Kevin Brian Wood, 39, of Connelly Springs with possession with intent to manufacture, sell or deliver methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia. Bond: $12,000 secured.
  • Ashley Brooke Newton, 24, of Morganton with possession with intent to manufacture, sell or deliver methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia and a probation violation. Bond: $12,999 secured.
  • Jennifer Marie Elmore, 25, of Hickory with possession with intent to manufacture, sell or deliver methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia, resisting a public officer, felony larceny and felony possession of stolen goods. Bond: $29,999 secured.
 HDR-Jerico-Chapman

Jerico Chapman
 HDR-Kevin-Wood

Kevin Wood
 HDR-Ashley-Newton

Ashley Newton
 HDR-Jennifer-Elmore

Jennifer Elmore
The Hickory Police Department received the call about a suspicious car at Total Convenience Market in the 300 block of U.S. 70, SW, according to the report. When an officer arrived, he spoke with the driver of the reported car, who was acting weird.

The officer checked the driver’s ID through the system and found he had an outstanding order for an arrest. Another person in the car had a syringe on them. Police searched the car and found methamphetamine, syringes, scales, baggies and spoons.

All four people in the car were charged for the drugs; two of the occupants — Chapman and Elmore — faced an additional charge after police alleged they hampered the investigation by providing false names.

According to the N.C. Department of Correction, Chapman is currently on probation for a car break-in and possessing stolen goods; he also has a past drug conviction in Burke County.

Newton is serving a nine-month probation for driving with a permanently revoked license, according to DOC.

Wood is on probation for larceny, according to DOC. He was convicted in 2010 of possessing drug paraphernalia. The report did not say Wood violated his probation.

 

 

 

 

http://www2.morganton.com/news/2012/jul/03/burke-county-charged-meth-bust-hickory-police-ar-2404329/

 

International students may have been duped into collecting packages as part of an elaborate scheme to import cold medicine from China to make speed and ice, police say.   Police uncovered several kilograms of the drug pseudoephedrine and 300 grams of methamphetamine in raids in Melbourne on Tuesday.   The Melbourne-based drug syndicate was importing over-the-counter medication ContacNT from China through the mail, Customs and Border Protection and Victoria Police allege.   Nine Chinese nationals, including students, were arrested in the raids, and a further six were detained by the immigration department as illegal immigrants.   Some of the students may have been innocently lured into the ring, says Customs Victoria regional director Graham Krisohos.

“They are recruited by criminal syndicates to accept a parcel and then unknowingly they are passing ContacNT to be used in the manufacture of illegal drugs,” he told journalists on Wednesday.

“That’s a warning to anyone who is approached to accept money to collect a parcel – you could be involved in a very serious criminal activity.”

It will be alleged the individuals involved were importing ContacNT into Melbourne through cargo and international mail systems and distributing it to various states to manufacture into speed and ice, Mr Krisohos said.   Sophisticated methods were used to import the drugs, hiding them in foodstuffs, camera tripods, deep fryers and paintings, Mr Krisohos said.   Testing is required to detect drugs inside professionally packaged items, as even thorough examinations do not reveal the illegal contents.   Ten kilograms of ContacNT, which is freely available in China, can make four kilograms of pseudoephedrine, which can in turn yield 2.8kg of methamphetamine.   So far, one woman has been charged with possessing a trafficable quantity of ice and bailed to attend the Heidelberg Magistrates Court on September 16.

 

 

 

http://www.odt.co.nz/news/world/australia/215673/victoria-drug-import-ring-busted

 

LACEY’S SPRING, Alabama – Morgan County deputies arrested three men and a woman on a charge of second-degree manufacturing of a controlled substance Monday after finding a methamphetamine laboratory in a one-room apartment, Morgan County Sheriff Ana Franklin said in a news release.

George Henry Rogers Jr., William Hunter Watkins, Sam Johnson and Casey Leeann Bearden were arrested on the charge and taken to the Morgan County Jail, Franklin said.

The Morgan County Task Force was helping the Morgan County Community Correction pogrom with a compliance check Monday at 69 Coffee Bluff Road when they found the four people inside a one-room apartment, the news release said.

Deputies found Watkins with a coffee filter containing a substance that field tested for pseudoephedrine, the release said. Agents searched the apartment and found a one-pot meth lab being assembled along with the materials used to make meth and drug paraphernalia, Franklin said.

Franklin said deputies have been to the apartment four previous times on meth manufacturing calls.

 

 

 

 

 

http://blog.al.com/breaking/2012/07/four_people_in_laceys_spring_a.html

 

Kayla Renee Adams, 22, 133 Keller St., West Monroe, was arrested Sunday by the Ouachita Parish Sheriff’s Office after suspected methamphetamine was found in her purse.

According to OPSO, a deputy investigating a complaint of drugs in a vehicle at a convenience store on Thomas Road came into contact with the suspect.

The arrest report stated Adams gave permission for her purse to be searched and inside was a small plastic bag, which she said was meth.

The suspect reportedly said she found the methamphetamine on Seal Street and picked it up, but had forgotten it was in her purse.

She was taken to Ouachita Correctional Center and was released after posting a $7,500 bond. Adams’ previous arrest for methamphetamine was on Feb. 22 and she was released on a $3,000 bond.

 

 

 

http://www.thenewsstar.com/article/20120703/NEWS01/207030327

 

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Authorities in suburban Louisville are accusing three people of making methamphetamine in a hotel room with a child inside.

The Courier-Journal reports the three were arrested last weekend and charged with manufacturing methamphetamine and first-degree wanton endangerment, among other charges. Arrested were 28-year-old Jennifer McQuillan and 31-year-old Erwin W. Bradley, both of Simpsonville, and 51-year-old Christopher A. Clark of Louisville.

According to arrest reports, Jeffersontown police allegedly found the meth lab at a hotel in the Louisville suburb, along with McQuillan and Bradley’s 4-year-old child sitting on the bed.

It’s the second time in a month that police have found an alleged meth lab at the hotel.

http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Meth-arrests-made-at-hotel-in-Louisville-suburb-3681283.php

A man accused of attempting to molest, then stab and strangle a 10-year-old boy in the restroom of a Portland Wendy’s restaurant Sunday is a notorious child abuser convicted 20 years ago in a Roseburg case that was the first of its kind in the nation. Adam Lee Brown was charged with using the AIDS virus to try to infect his young victims in Roseburg in 1992. Prosecutors said he sexually abused up to nine children ranging in age from 2 to 18 in his home that summer after plying them with drugs, alcohol and pornographic videos. A former Marine and lay preacher, Brown was indicted on 43 charges, including attempted murder and rape, but was sentenced to 16 years in prison in 1993 after he pleaded no contest to reduced charges of three counts of sodomy and reckless endangerment.
adamleebrown1.JPG
Adam Lee Brown pleaded not guilty Monday to attempted aggravated murder, assault, kidnapping, strangulation, coercion and attempted sex abuse accusations in connection with Sunday’s alleged attack of a boy in a Northeast Portland Wendy’s.
The plea deal was accepted to avoid putting his young victims through a grueling trial and because medical experts said at the time there was no way Brown would survive another 10 years, let alone two or three, due to his HIV status, said William Marshall, who prosecuted Brown then.
“We look back now and we know far different things,” said Marshall, now a Douglas County judge.
Brown served only 11 years of his sentence because of earned time and credit for time served.
Since his release from prison in 2004 as a predatory sex offender, his behavior has been marked by repeated crimes: methamphetamine possession, burglary, use of pornography, identity theft and furnishing alcohol to minors, as well as multiple “severe psychiatric episodes” that landed him in the emergency room at the Portland VA Medical Center.
In December, a social worker from the hospital’s mental health unit recommended Brown be placed in a residential treatment program because he wasn’t taking his psychiatric medication, failed to comply with outpatient treatment and was in really “bad shape,” state records show.
He has been sent to jail seven times for violating the conditions of his post-prison supervision. Most recently, a warrant was issued for his arrest June 14 after he failed to report to his Multnomah County parole officer on June 6 and couldn’t be found at Portland’s downtown Henry Building, where he was supposed to be living, according to state records.
Adam Lee Brown, accused of stabbing 10-year-old, makes first court appearance
Adam Lee Brown, dressed in a suicide smock, pleaded not guilty to numerous charges, including attempted murder, first-degree sexual abuse, first-degree kidnapping, first-degree arson, coercion, furnishing false information to a police officer and four counts of first-degree assault.  This video has no audio, per court’s instructions. Pool video by KATU.Watch video
In Sunday’s attack, Brown is accused of forcing a 10-year-old boy into a restroom of the Wendy’s on Northeast Sandy Boulevard about 2 p.m. and locking the door while attempting to touch the boy’s genitals, according to a criminal information filed in court.
When the boy fought back, Brown allegedly stabbed him in the neck, leg, thumb and hand with a knife and tried to strangle him, court records said.
Hearing the boy’s cries, his father tried to force open the locked door until a restaurant manager opened it with a key. Brown shoved the child out of the bathroom and locked the door again, police said. Restaurant patrons held the door closed until police arrived. Brown surrendered after a two-hour standoff.
On Monday, Brown, 49, dressed in an anti-suicide smock, pleaded not guilty in Multnomah County Circuit Court to attempted aggravated murder, first-degree assault, second-degree assault, kidnapping, two counts of attempted first-degree sexual abuse, coercion, strangulation and two counts of reckless burning. He also faced a warrant for violation of his parole conditions.
“It was already known he was out of compliance, and he was arrested ultimately under extremely unfortunate conditions,” said Jeremiah Stromberg, spokesman and board member of the Oregon Board of Parole and Post-Prison Supervision. “He was out on post-prison supervision. He wasn’t confined to an institution. … Ultimately, he cannot be watched 24-7.”
Hank Stern, a Multnomah County spokesman, said the county will review the case closely. “They’re working as quickly as possible to learn what happened,” Stern said.
But Brown’s earlier victims and their relatives reacted with disgust and anger when they learned of the new allegations.
“This man should never have had a chance to get to this child,” said Ed Binder, whose daughter was 5 when she was sexually abused by Brown in Roseburg.
adamleebrown2JPG
The Associated Press/1993Adam Lee Brown (right) confers with his attorney during a plea hearing in Douglas County Circuit Court in Roseburg in February 1993.
Brown’s own daughter, Ashley Thornton, was 7 when she was abused by her father. She’s now 27.
“Being one of Adam’s main victims 20 years ago, makes this like a buried nightmare brought back to life,” she said. “Eleven years wasn’t long enough for everything he did to me and the other kids in 1992.”
When released from prison in 2004, Brown initially was under Douglas County supervision. In 2009, he was cited by police for furnishing alcohol to a 20-year-old at Roseburg’s Bob’s Deli.
By April 2010, he moved to a temporary shelter in Multnomah County after he complained he had no housing resources in Douglas County. His Roseburg psychiatrist recommended Brown be transferred to Multnomah County supervision, citing harassment and “many roadblocks” Brown faced trying to integrate into Douglas County.
The psychiatrist wrote to the state that Brown deserved an “environment in which he can have a chance to fully rehabilitate and live without fear … where there are more resources for him.”
In January 2011, his supervision was formally transferred to Multnomah County, but his behavior didn’t improve, state records show. He received jail time twice in the last year and a half for violating conditions of his supervision.
He was sent to jail for 29 days in June 2011 for having the pornographic video “Bed Buddies” in his apartment, failing a polygraph, not reporting to his parole officer and gambling away his monthly Social Security check playing video poker.
This past January, he had ransacked the Quest Integrated Center for Health on East Burnside, where he received care. A TV was left on with a pornographic DVD playing, state records show.
His Multnomah County parole officer Tracey Madsen sent him back to jail for 90 days, from Feb. 16 through April 13 this year. He had failed to report to his parole officer, had methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia during an ER visit to the VA Hospital, evidence of drug dealing on his cell phone and was convicted of identity-theft for stealing others’ mail in Coos County on Feb. 14.
Brown’s post-prison supervision was scheduled to last through October 2020.
Nancy Plambaeck, Brown’s ex-wife and mother of their two children who were abused by Brown, said she’s received at least a dozen notices from Oregon’s Victim Notification Service since Brown was released from prison alerting her that he was back in jail.
She received the most recent one at 5:08 a.m. Monday.
When she learned the details of his alleged Portland attack, she was dumbfounded that those who supervised him couldn’t have prevented it. “He’s been sent back to jail so many times since he’s been released,” Plambaeck said. “I mean red flag, after red flag.
“It just makes me want to cry, and vomit,” she said. “They should have never let him out … Now he should never get out. He should die in prison.”

San Luis, Arizona – A 26-year-old Mexican national, Luz Garcia, was arrested early Thursday morning for attempting to smuggle more than 56 pounds of methamphetamine into the United States through the San Luis Port.

Customs and Border Protection officers assigned to the San Luis Port referred Garcia for a secondary inspection of her Pontiac sedan. Officers conducting a search of the vehicle located 50 packages of methamphetamine inside the vehicle’s firewall.

The drugs and vehicle were processed for seizure. The driver was arrested and turned over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations.

Individuals arrested may be charged by complaint, the method by which a person is charged with criminal activity, which raises no inference of guilt. An individual is presumed innocent unless and until competent evidence is presented to a jury that establishes guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

 

 

 

http://www.yumanewsnow.com/index.php/news/border/655-san-luis-cbp-officers-arrest-woman-for-smuggling-methamphetamine

 

PORT CHARLOTTE, Fla.- A Charlotte County Sheriff’s deputy Sunday recognized a driver wanted for fleeing to elude last week, made the traffic stop, and found methamphetamine and $3,398 in cash in car. Clayton Paul Harris, 25, of 25240 Derringer Place in Deep Creek was arrested for the crime.

On June 27, the deputy had been looking for Harris who was seen driving while his license had been suspended 12 times. At 2:15 a.m. the deputy saw Harris exit his home, get into his white Audi and drive away. The deputy attempted to make a traffic stop, but Harris took off at a high rate of speed when he turned onto Kings Highway and drove into Desoto county. The deputy stopped following and notified the Desoto County Sheriff’s Office but they were unable to locate Harris.

Sunday, the same deputy observed Harris driving his Audi and waited until Harris got stuck in traffic at a red light at Kings Highway and Veteran’s Boulevard. The deputy placed him under arrest. During an inventory of the car, the deputy found several pairs of shorts on the front passenger seat. Inside a pair of the blue jean shorts was a plastic baggie with numerous pieces of crystal Methamphetamine. Located on the front driver’s seat was $3,398 in cash. The money was seized for forfeiture.

Harris was transported to the Charlotte County Jail and charged with Possession of Methamphetamine, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia; Fleeing to Elude Law Enforcement, and two counts of Driving While License was Suspended with Knowledge. Harris remains in the County Jail on $16,500 bond. This is his fifth booking.

 

 

 

http://www.winknews.com/Local-Florida/2012-07-02/Man-accused-of-fleeing-deputy-when-traffic-stop-attempted

 

 

Police say Travis Richard Fairbanks of Northfield had 2.44 grams of methamphetamine with him when he was found unresponsive in an Eagan hotel room in February

 

A Northfield man has been charged in Dakota County with felony drug possession after police say he passed out in an Eagan hotel room in February and had to be awakened by officers.

Travis Richard Fairbanks, 28, is charged with fifth-degree drug possession, which carries a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a $10,000 fine.

According to the criminal complaint, an employee at an Eagan hotel called police Feb. 3 and reported that Fairbanks, a registered guest, had asked for a wake-up call at noon, but had not responded to the phone call.

When Fairbanks missed his checkout time, hotel staff went to his room and found him unresponsive. When police arrived, a hotel employee unlocked his room door, and officers shook Fairbanks until he woke up.

When Fairbanks awakened, he appeared to be confused and had slurred speech and bloodshot, glassy eyes, according to the complaint. Police asked him for identification, and he directed them to a wallet in the pocket of his jeans.

An officer found the wallet, along with a methamphetamine pipe containing residue, the complaint says. A further search of Fairbanks’ backpack turned up a torch lighter, a vial of methamphetamine and other drug paraphernalia, police said.

A blue rubber tourniquet was found lying next to Fairbanks on the bed, according to the complaint.

Fairbanks told police that he has used methamphetamine, both smoking and injecting it, for about two years, and that he pays about $100 a gram for the drug, the complaint says.

A subsequent test of the drugs found that Fairbanks had 2.44 grams of methamphetamine in his possession, according to the complaint.

Fairbanks, who is not in custody, is scheduled to make a first appearance on the charge July 16 in Dakota County District Court in Hastings.

 

 

 

 

http://eagan.patch.com/articles/man-charged-with-meth-possession-in-eagan-hotel-room

 

It is the easiest drug to get addicted to. It is the hardest addiction to break.

So goes the vicious cycle of methamphetamine use, a drug created using basic household cleaning products that leads to a twisted life of crime and horror, as detailed in reporter Scott Thomas Anderson’s new book “Shadow People: How Meth-driven Crime is Eating at the Heart of Rural America.”

Crime writer, recovering addicts discuss how to fight methamphetamine addiction

Reporter Scott Thomas Anderson speaks at the Lodi Public Library about methamphetamine addiction on Sunday, July 1, 2012. Anderson is the author of a book titled “Shadow People: How Meth-driven Crime is Eating at the Heart of Rural America.”

 

Anderson, the crime reporter for the Amador Ledger-Dispatch, spent 18 months traveling across the United States, visiting with law enforcement, addicts and families of methamphetamine users to chronicle not only the destructiveness but the power of the drug.

Along with two recovering methamphetamine addicts, Anderson visited the Lodi Public Library on Sunday to discuss his book and give audience members an insightful look into how people get hooked — and also rebound from the drug.

“Some people will read this book and they will get angry,” Anderson said. “But that is OK. This book is not meant to scare people, though. It is meant more to be a way to look for solutions.”

Solutions, for example, in the form of those found by Matthew Learned and Stacy Wells.

Both were heavy methamphetamine users. Both ended up losing everything.

But they stood in front of audience members Sunday, clean and sober.

Learned was actually featured in Anderson’s book. In Learned’s chapter, readers discover that he had been in and out of the prison system for 17 years.

Back behind bars again, Learned had no direction and he did not seem to care. Then, one day, he heard two sentences that would completely switch his outlook on life.

“Any back pain you had would go away. Any tooth ache was gone,” he said of the drug. “It was incredible. But then I was told ‘Man up. Get real.'”

Man up. Get real. The words sunk into Learned’s memory. He was a new father, and his daughter’s mother was telling him he would never get to see her, because she did not want that kind of life for the baby.

Man up. Get real. So Learned learned how to beat his addiction, if for no other reason than to keep a promise he made to his daughter’s mother that he would never abandon his family. He would never let drugs get in the way.

For Stacy Wells, getting clean and sober was something she knew she could accomplish. She just had a hard time saying no.

Wells had been a recovering addict for eight years before she started using again with her ex-husband. She said she had been tired of babysitting the man.

“It was that mentality of ‘If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em,'” she said.

Wells started using heavily again, and she recalled thinking of ways she could kick the habit as she was loading up her pipe for a smoke.

Wells and her husband were arrested later for possession of a controlled substance and child endangerment, among other charges. Wells said that day was when she hit rock bottom, sitting in the jail cell, alone, getting booked.

“I went from a family of six to a family of one,” she said. “I was literally standing at the glass licking it, asking to be let out.”

Wells only spent five days in jail, but like Learned had to attend hundreds of hours of classes and do numerous hours of community service in addition to staying clean.

“I figured if I was willing to do anything to get dope, then I better be willing to do anything to stay clean,” Wells said.

 

 

 

 

http://www.lodinews.com/news/article_b81e668d-3bd7-52cf-934c-d6d5cd22355f.html

 

Methamphetamine abuse leads to an increase in child abuse and neglect, which causes an increase in foster care admissions, according to a study from Baylor University.

 

The study, published online in the journal Economic Inquiry, found that a 1 percent increase in meth use led to a 1.5 percent increase in foster care admissions. It is the first study to provide evidence for meth abuse’s causal effect on foster home admissions.

Follow this link to read the entire study: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1465-7295.2012.00481.x/full

“Our findings suggest strongly that the social costs of parental meth use include child maltreatment and growth in foster care placements,” said Scott Cunningham, Ph.D., study co-author and assistant professor of economics at Baylor University’s Hankamer School of Business. “To address this, child welfare policies should be designed specifically for the children of meth-using parents.”

To measure the effect of meth use on foster care admissions, Cunningham and co-author Keith Finlay, Ph.D., assistant professor of economics at Tulane University, collected monthly data on foster care admissions and exits, meth drug treatment admissions, retail meth prices, and a variety of other potentially relevant factors from January 1995 to December 1999.

The study centered on federal laws that severely restricted two key ingredients used to produce methamphetamine: ephedrine, which was restricted in 1995, and pseudoephedrine, which was restricted in 1997.

“The consequence of each policy was to cause a temporary scarcity of methamphetamine in the market, driving prices up and purity down,” Cunningham said.

The 1995 restriction caused a dramatic spike in meth prices, but the effect was relatively short lived. After six months, prices returned to their pre-restriction level. The 1997 regulation had a smaller but more sustained effect on prices–lasting approximately a year.

“Public health professionals have observed these large social costs of methamphetamine production and use,” Finlay said. “Our paper is one of the first to provide plausible causal evidence of these effects that are not borne by users but by children.”

The study used foster care enrollment data from the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System (AFCARS), a federally mandated database that aggregates detailed case information on each child in foster care and each child who has been adopted under the authority of all state child welfare agencies. AFCARS also indicates whether a child was removed as a result of neglect, physical abuse, parental drug use or parental incarceration.

The U.S. foster care population increased from approximately 280,000 to 408,000–a rise of over 45 percent due primarily to increased admissions in the 1980s and 1990s. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, from 1986 to 2010, there was a stark increase in the foster care population from the mid-1980s to the late 1990s caused by a rapid growth in entry with no associated uptick in exit.

From August 1995 to December 1995, white meth treatment self- admissions fell 26.5 percent due to the 1995 ephedrine regulation. The drop was temporary since drug producers substituted pseudoephedrine and meth self-admissions grew 25.6 percent from December 1995 to February 1998. That growth caused 2,257 children to enter foster care, according to the researchers.

“Given the large social costs of meth use on child maltreatment, policymakers face a significant challenge to reduce its use,” Cunningham said. “Regions with intensive meth use should consider greater resources for meth treatment and child welfare services. These areas have historically been rural or exurban and so may already be underserved. Our study also highlights the social benefits of policies restricting consumer access to methamphetamine ingredients, like pseudoephedrine.”

 

 

 

 

http://www.redorbit.com/news/health/1112649260/when-parents-use-methamphetamines-child-abuse-and-foster-care-admissions-increase/

 

A father and son were arrested Wednesday after law enforcementofficers found a meth lab in one of their bedrooms at their home in Woodbridge, police said.

Kevin Davis, 32, was designated as one of the individuals on probation or parole who was to be searched during the citywide sweep Wednesday.

Davis, who was living with his father, Kerry Davis, was found at his father’s home on the 19000 block of North Lower Sacramento Road, space #19, with numerous chemicals and materials that indicated the residence was being used as a methamphetamine lab.

Davis, who was on probation, was arrested along with his father and both were booked on suspicion of possession of a controlled substance as well as suspicion of manufacturing a controlled substance.

Their bails have been set at $360,000 each. They are scheduled to appear in Lodi court today at 12:15 p.m.

 

 

 

http://www.lodinews.com/news/article_66e99e20-a66c-11e1-8931-001a4bcf887a.html

 

 

FLOUR BLUFF – Police say they found a methamphetamine lab at the Bay Club apartment complex while investigating a home invasion last night. Officers said they found a 22-year-old bleeding from his mouth and face. The victim said a white male between 20 and 30 years old broke into his apartment and assaulted him. The victim was taken to the hospital. Police say a computer hard drive was taken but it appeared the suspect was looking for more.

While officers were writing the report, They discovered a suspicious bag stored inside the oven. After evacuating the apartment building, police called narcotics to the complex. The narcotics team verified the materials inside the oven were that of a methamphetamine lab.

Police are still looking for the suspect. At this time, an investigation is ongoing to determine if the victim will be charged in regards to the methamphetamine lab.

 

 

 

http://www.kristv.com/news/police-find-methamphetamine-lab-while-investigating-home-invasion/